Madness Monday – Robert Ainsworth (1880-1959)

Madness Monday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Madness Monday simply create a post with the main focus being an ancestor who either suffered some form of mental illness or an ancestor who might be hard to locate and drives you mad.

Robert Ainsworth is my 1st cousin 3x removed. He was born in Kendal, Westmorland, on 7 June 1880 to parents Thomas Ainsworth and Ann Carradice. Our common ancestors are John Carradice and Ann Ridley, my 3x great grandparents.

I have Robert in the 1881, 1891, 1901 and 1911 census returns and also the 1939 Register.

In 1891 he was a scholar
In 1901 he was a labourer in a woollen mill
In 1911 he was in prison.

I decided to have a look to see if I could find anything about why Robert ended up in prison at the time of the 1911 census.

There was nothing in the newspaper archives on Find My Past – so presumably nothing of a serious nature then?

How about the crime and punishment registers? – I found 14 entries for Robert over a seven year period.

Date

Offence

Punishment

Date of Discharge

9 May 1904

Disorderly Conduct

14 Days

21 May 1904

22 November 1904

Refusal of Task in Workhouse

7 Days

28 November 1904

23 December 1904

Misbehaviour in Workhouse

14 Days

5 January 1905

15 May 1905

Disorderly

14 Days

27 May 1905

13 June 1905

Obscene Language

14 Days

26 June 1905

10 August 1908

Obscene Language

14 Days

23 August 1908

16 September 1908

Obscene Language

14 Days

30 September 1908

7 June 1909

BBL (?)

14 Days

20 Jun 1909

3 July 1909

Assault PC

2 Months

2 September 1909

25 April 1910

Abusive Language

14 Days

8 May 1910

18 June 1910

Assault PC

4 Months

17 October 1910

29 October 1910

Obscene Language

14 Days

11 November 1910

15 November 1910

Begging

14 Days

28 November 1910

7 March 1911

Assault PC / Obscene Language            

4 Months / 14 Days                          

6 July 1911

So at the time of the census on 2 April 1911 Robert had been in prison for almost four weeks for assaulting a Police Constable and using obscene language.

Clearly Robert was a habitual offender for at least these seven years. So I hear you ask at this point – why is this post not in the Black Sheep Sunday category? Well please read on for the answer!!

Below is the 1911 entry from the Crime & Punishment Registers. You will see the note in the end column – Certified insane on 6th May 1911 and removed to Carlisle Asylum 10th May 1911.

Crime & Punishment Register 1911.png

It took at least seven years of regular offending and prison sentences before Robert was certified as being ill.

At the moment I do not know how long Robert spent in the Carlisle Asylum. However he was certainly there at the time of the 1939 Register, which was completed on 29 September that year. He is shown as a patient and has an occupation as a general labourer.

There is a death record for Robert Ainsworth in the September quarter of 1959 registered in the Border District of Northumberland – I am confident that this is my Robert.

Mystery Monday – Martha Blackburn (nee Stowell)

Mystery Monday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

Closely related to Madness Monday only these missing ancestors might not cause madness! Mystery Monday is where you can post about mystery ancestors or mystery records – anything in your genealogy and family history research which is currently unsolved. This is a great way to get your fellow genealogy bloggers to lend their eyes to what you’ve found so far and possibly help solve the mystery.

Martha Stowell is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. Her parents are Thomas Stowell and Ann Wroe. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

Martha was born on 23 July 1867. She was baptised on 18 August 1867 at Holy Trinity Church, Habergham Eaves, Burnley, Lancashire.

I have Martha in the 1871 and 1881 census returns. I then have a marriage for Martha to Robert Blackburn on 17 May 1884 at St Mary of the Assumption, Burnley, Lancashire. Details of this are from the Online Parish Clerks for the County of Lancashire Project

And then…..the trail goes cold.

I can’t find Martha on any later census or on the 1939 Register. Neither can I find her in the travel and immigration records online.

I know she was still alive in 1931. Her sister, Margaret Ann Gerrey died that year. Here is a link to my Sunday’s Obituary post. You will see among the floral tributes is one from “sister Martha and family”.

So Martha remains a MYSTERY!!

However I am not the only one interested in the whereabouts of Martha Blackbun (formerly Stowell).

Below is a notice from the Burnley Express of 24 April 1942.

Burnley Express 29 April 1942.png

Re MARTHA BLACKBURN
(formerly STOWELL)

INFORMATION is desired respecting the above named who was the wife of Robert Blackburn and who in 1886 resided at 252, Cog Lane, Habergham Eaves near Burnley and later is believed to have resided in Haslingden and Earby. Any person who can give information as to her present whereabouts or (if dead) the date and place of her death is requested to communicate with

SPRAKE & RANSON
Solicitors
19, Union Street, Accrington
Tel. No. 2226

Hmm should I get in touch and see if they can help me after all this time……maybe not.

Black Sheep Sunday – Fred Gostelow (1863-1921)

Black Sheep Sunday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Black Sheep Sunday simply create a post with the main focus being an ancestor with a “shaded past.”

Fred Gostelow is my wife’s great grand uncle – brother of her great grandmother Sarah Ann Gostelow.

Fred was born in 1863 to parents Samuel Gostelow and Emma Padley, my wife’s 2x great grandparents. His birth is registered in Q4 at Spilsby, Lincolnshire.

In the 1881 census Fred is working as a farm servant and living and working at Brick Kilns Farm, Broughton, Lincolnshire.

In 1887 Fred married Alice Stuffins sometime in the June quarter – the marriage is registered at Caistor, Lincolnshire.

It was during this period that Fred got in to trouble and found himself the subject of report in the Lincolnshire Chronicle of 8 July 1887.

Lincolnshire Chronicle - 8 July 1887.png

Blyborough – At the Lindsey Quarter Sessions at Lincoln, on Friday, before Sir C H J Anderson and other Magistrates, Fred Gostelow, farm servant, aged 23, was indicted for stealing a purse, a £5 bank note, and three sovereigns, the property of Albert Scott, at Blyborough, on the 14th May. The jury found the prisoner guilty and recommended him to mercy on account of his previous good character. The Court, taking into consideration the recommendation of the jury, sentenced the prisoner to two calendar months’ imprisonment with hard labour, a sentence which the Chairman described as very lenient.

So not the perfect start to married life.

Fred and Alice had five children:-

Ethel – born 20 March 1888
Walter – born 1 January 1890
William – born 11 December 1892
Wilfred – born & died about March 1896
Cyril – born about March 1897 – died in WW1

Between 1891 and 1911 the family lived in Barnetby, Lincolnshire.

Fred passed away towards the end of 1921 – his death is registered in the December quarter.

Alice remarried at the age of 58 in 1924 to Joseph K Smith. I haven’t located a death registration yet for her.

Black Sheep Sunday – George Astin (1835-1867)

Black Sheep Sunday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Black Sheep Sunday simply create a post with the main focus being an ancestor with a “shaded past.”

George Astin is my 2nd great grand uncle – brother of my 2x great grandmother Ann Astin. He was born in Burnley, Lancashire, about 1835 to parents Robert Astin and Nancy Dyson, my 3x great grandparents.

George died at the young age of 32 and was buried on 5 November 1867 in Burnley Cemetery.

Trawling the newspaper archives I came across the following article in the Burnley Advertiser of 7 October 1865.

Burnley Advertiser 7 October 1865 - George Astin.png

A REBELLIOUS SON – George Astin, who did not appear, was summoned for an assault upon his father, Robert Astin. The complainant said that on the Wednesday before, his son struck him twice, once on the shoulder and once on the body. The assault was in Gas Street, and the father was struck because he would not let his son break the window out. They had had a good deal of trouble with him the last three years. He kept leaving his work and going drinking. He was not drunk when he struck the blows, but he had had some drink. Complainant wanted protection from him. Fined 10s and costs; in default to be committed to prison for one month, with hard labour.

I can’t help wonder what was the cause of George’s rebellious behaviour.

Sadly, two years later he was dead and buried. Did Robert and George ever mend their relationship?

Black Sheep Sunday – Martha Espley (1839-1908)

Black Sheep Sunday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Black Sheep Sunday simply create a post with the main focus being an ancestor with a “shaded past.”

Martha Espley is my wife’s 1st cousin 3x removed. She was born about 1839 to parents John Espley and Sarah Johnson. Martha’s grandparents, James Espley and Martha Silvester, are my wife’s 3x great grandparents.

As far as I can tell Martha had three children “out of wedlock”:-

John Espley – born 12 December 1859
Charles Espley – born 15 March 1862
Samuel Espley – born about June 1870

Shortly after Charles was born Martha found herself in court on a charge of “attempted child murder”.

Below are two extracts from the Chester Chronicle of 9 August 1862.

The first is part of the address to the grand jury at Chester Crown Court on Monday 4 August by Mr Justice Channell.

Chester Chronicle - 9 August 1862 [1].png

There was another case upon the calendar in which a woman was charged with attempting to murder her child, of about three weeks old; the case was a very short one; it appeared that the mother had been delivered at the Workhouse, and left of her own accord, taking the child with her, and on the day in question she must have tied up the child’s mouth with a bandage in a way which the prosecution suggested was intended to produce death by suffocation. The woman’s account was that she was in distress, and she proposed to go to the adjoining village to get some refreshment either by begging or some way or another, intending to return to the child, but she denied the charge of attempting to murder it. It might be that the woman bound the bandage round the child’s mouth for the purpose of preventing it from crying, and not to produce the effect which the prosecution attributed to it. A necessary ingredient in the case was whether the intention existed of murdering the child, and if they found that this did not exist, they should ignore the bill. He did not invite them to do so, but merely mentioned it for their consideration. His Lordship referred to an Act of Parliament which made it a misdemeanour to expose any child under two years of age.

This second extract reports on the verdict of the jury.

Chester Chronicle - 9 August 1862.png

CHARGE OF ATTEMPTED CHILD MURDER

Martha Espley, 22, was charged with attempting to murder a male child of the age of three weeks, of which she was the mother, by fastening a bandage round its mouth and nose, and throwing it into a field and deserting it, at Buglawton, on the 3rd April.

Counsel for the prosecution, Mr Swetenham; for the prisoner, Mr Brandt.

The jury, after a brief consultation, returned a verdict of Not Guilty.

The image below is from the Criminal Register showing that Martha was acquitted.

Criminal Registers 1791-1892.png

Martha subsequently married Samuel Hazeldine sometime in the September quarter of 1875. They had at least five children together over the next ten years.

Martha died, at the age of about 69 in the last months of 1908.

Sunday’s Obituary – Edith Bailey (nee Harker 1879-1952

Sunday’s Obituary is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Sunday’s Obituary, post obituaries along with other information about that person.

Edith Harker is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. She was born in Cowling, West Yorkshire, on 21 July 1879 to parents James Harker and Dinah Dawson. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson, my 4x great grandparents.

I have been able to find Edith in all the census returns from 1881 to 1911 and on the 1939 Register.

In the first census after leaving school (1901 census) she is described as a “baker”. At that time she would be working for her mother who ran a bakery and confectionery business at 121 Keighley Road, Cowling.

Edith married John Bailey sometime in the June quarter of 1908.

In the 1911 census John’s occupation is given as “butcher”. By the time of the 1939 Register John and Edith had taken over the bakery and confectionery business from Edith’s parents.

Edith passed away on 4 January 1952 and her obituary can be found in the Barnoldswick & Earby Times of 11 January 1952.

Barnoldswick & Earby Times 11 January 1952 - Edith HarkerDeath of Mrs Edith Bailey.

The death occurred last Friday at her home, of Mrs Edith Bailey, 14 Green Street, Cowling. Aged 72 years, and the widow of the late Mr John Bailey, Mrs Bailey was a well known and very highly esteemed Cowling lady. She was the younger daughter of the late Mr and Mrs James Harker, and for 31 years along with her husband conducted the business of bakers and confectioners, Keighley Road, Cowling, which business was founded by her parents 54 years ago. Mr and Mrs Bailey retired from the business seven years ago, and Mr Bailey died five years ago. Of a very kindly and generous disposition, Mrs Bailey was popular amongst a large host of friends, and throughout her business life was renowned for her cheerful manner. Except for a few years in Keighley she had resided in Cowling all her life. Mrs Bailey has been a lifelong Methodist worker, and prior to her marriage was actively associated with the Ickornshaw Methodist Church, where she was a member of the Choir. After her marriage to Mr John Bailey, she linked up her interests with the Methodist cause at the Bar Methodist Church, where her husband was Choirmaster for many years, and both Mr and Mrs Bailey gave many years loyal service to the Church. Right up to the time of her death Mrs Bailey was a loyal worshipper and member of the Cowling Methodist Church. She was also a keen Liberal worker for the Cowling Women’s Liberal Association. The funeral took place on Tuesday, when services at the home and at the Church were conducted by the Rev F Blundred, who paid a sincere tribute to Mrs Bailey’s noble character, saying that the Church fellowship would be considerably the poorer for her passing. There were many floral tributes, and the many friends present at the Church was an indication of the great respect and esteem in which Mrs Bailey was held. Mr James E Fort played appropriate music at the organ.

Sunday’s Obituary – Martin Gawthrop (1892-1951)

Sunday’s Obituary is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Sunday’s Obituary, post obituaries along with other information about that person.

Martin Gawthrop is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Fred Gawthrop and Margaret Ann Slater. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley (my 3x great grandparents).

Martin was born on 4 March 1892 and his birth is registered at Burnley, Lancashire.

He first appears in the 1901 census living with his parents in Embsay, near Skipton, Yorkshire. Ten years later the 1911 census shows the family living at 7 Sawley Street, Skipton. Martin is working as a “cotton warp dresser”.

Early in 1912 Martin married Isabella Brierley. The marriage is registered in Skipton in Q1.

Martin and Isabella had four children:-

Harold – born 3 July 1912
Martin – born 1916
Irene – born 1924
Vera – born 1925

The family are still living in Skipton at the time of the 1939 Register at the outbreak of WW2 and Martin continues to work as a “warp dresser”.

Sadly Isabella died before the end of 1943 at the age of 51 – her death is registered in Q4 at Keighley, West Yorkshire

Martin then remarried about a year later to Sarah Hannah Cooper – this marriage is registered in Skipton in the December quarter 1944.

The following article from the Barnoldswick & Early Times of 13 July 1951 reports on Martin’s death.

barnoldswick-earby-times-13-july-1951

Mr Martin Gawthrop

We regret to report the death of Mr Martin Gawthrop, of 58 Emmott Lane, Laneshawbridge, which occurred on July 7th. Mr Gawthrop was 59. The interment took place at Skipton Cemetery on Tuesday, the Rev W E Burkitt officiating.

Floral tokens were sent by the following:- Mrs M Gawthrop; Mr and Mrs H Gawthrop; Mr and Mrs Lynch; Mr and Mrs Cooper; Mr and Mrs Hodgson; Mr and Mrs Whitaker and Mr Barker; Mr and Mrs Swales and family; Mr and Mrs Varley and Mrs Dobson.

The undertakers were Colne Co-operative Society.

Sarah lived for nearly four more years and eventually passed away at the age of 65 on 23 February 1955 in the Reedyford Hospital, Nelson, Lancashire.