St James Church Clitheroe

Wedding Wednesday – William Turner and Hilda Mallalieu

William Turner is my 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Alexander Turner and Jane Alice Brotherton. Our common ancestors are Thomas Turner and Mary Jane Carradice – my 2x great grandparents.

William was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire – his birth is registered in the September quarter of 1912.

William was on active service in WW2 and spent a number of years as a prisoner of war.

On 24 March 1951 William married Hilda Mallalieu at St. James’s Church, Clitheroe. The wedding was announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on Friday 30 March 1951 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Turner & Hilda Mallalieu - CAT 30 March 1951.png

TURNER – MALLALIEU

At St. James’s Church, Clitheroe, on Saturday, the marriage took place of Mr. William Turner, fourth son of Mrs. J. A. Turner, of 20 Whipp Avenue, Clitheroe, and Mrs. Hilda Mallalieu, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. Kenyon, 9 Lower Antley Street, Accrington.
The ceremony was performed by the Rev. A. Lord, rector, and the hymns “Lead Us Heavenly Father” and “O Perfect Love” were sung. Mr. G. Hitchen being organist.
Given away by her father, the bride wore a grey coat with hat to match and carried a bouquet of carnations.
Mr. C. A. Hall was best man and Messrs. G. Turner and H. Turner were groomsmen.
The reception was held at the Craven Heifer Hotel, Whalley Road. Mr. and Mrs. Turner are to reside at 15 Wilson Street, Clitheroe.
Wedding gifts included cheques from the Committee and members of the Clitheroe Central Working Men’s Club and from the staff and employees at the North Western Electricity Board.

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Wedding Wednesday – Norma Musgrove and Bernard Wearden

Norma Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Joseph Musgrove and Annie Simpson. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

Norma married Bernard Wearden at St James Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire, on 7 July 1954. The following notice was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times two days later.

WEARDEN—MUSGROVE

Mr Bernard Wearden, son of Mr and the late Mrs J Wearden, of 30 Thomas Street, Colne, and Miss Norma Musgrove, daughter of Mr and Mrs J Musgrove, of 58 West View, Clitheroe, were married at St James’s Church, Clitheroe, on Wednesday, by the Rector, the Rev A Lord. Mr G Hitchen, was the organist.

Given away by her father, the bride wore a gown of white silk net over taffeta, trimmed with orange blossom. Her full length embroidered veil was held in place by a wreath of orange blossom, and she carried a bouquet of pink carnations and pink roses.

The bridesmaid was Miss Edith Musgrove, sister of the bride, who wore pink and mauve silk net over pink taffeta, trimmed with lace. She had a pink feathered headdress and carried a bouquet of white carnations.

Mr Malcolm Frankland, friend of the bridegroom, was best man, and Mr Gordon Pinch, was groomsman.

After a reception at the Station Hotel, Mr and Mrs Wearden left for their honeymoon, the bride wearing a light-grey costume with pink and black accessories. They will reside at 9 Atkincoats Road, Colne.

Among the wedding gifts was a silver coffee service from the bride’s workfriends.

Wedding Wednesday – Edith May Musgrove and Malcolm Graham Frankland

Edith May Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Joseph Musgrove and Annie Simpson. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

Edith May married Malcolm Graham Frankland at St James Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire on 17 September 1955. Details of the wedding were announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 23 September 1955.

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FRANKLAND – MUSGROVE

Miss Edith May Musgrove, younger daughter of Mr and Mrs J Musgrove, of 58 West View, Clitheroe, was married at St James’s Church, Clitheroe, on Saturday, to Mr Malcolm Graham Frankland, only son of Mr and Mrs W Frankland, of Victoria Avenue, Chatburn.

Given away by her father, the bride was attired in a gown of white silk net over taffeta, trimmed with orange blossom, with a full-length veil surmounted with a wreath of orange blossom. She carried a bouquet of pink roses and white carnations.

She was attended by her sister, Mrs Norma Wearden, who wore a dress of blue net trimmed with white net and pearls. Her bouquet was of mixed sweet peas.

The best man was Mr M Nixon, a friend of the bridegroom, and the groomsmen were Mr B Wearden, brother-in-law of the bride, and Mr D Frankland, a friend of the groom.

During the ceremony, which was conducted by the Rector, the Rev J S Parry, the hymns “Lead us, Heavenly Father” and “The Voice that breath’d o’er Eden” were sung. Mr G Hitchen was organist.

A reception was held at the Station Hotel, Clitheroe, after which the couple left for a honeymoon in Blackpool, the bride wearing a lemon coloured dress and tweed coat, with tan accessories. They will reside at 58 West View, Clitheroe.

Among the numerous wedding gifts were a fruit set and wineglasses from workfriends of the bride at Stonebridge Mill, Chatburn, and a clock and towels from companions of the bridegroom in the 4th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment, TA.

Wedding Wednesday – Albert Kent and Hazel Musgrove

Hazel Musgrove is my aunty – her parents are Fred Ainsworth Stowell Musgrove and Florrie Musgrove.

Hazel was born on 31 January 1925 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

On 5 April 1947 Hazel married Albert Kent at St James Church, Clitheroe. The wedding was announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 11 April 1947.

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KENT – MUSGROVE

On Saturday, at St James’s Church, the Rector (Rev Alexander Lord) solemnised the wedding of Mr Albert Kent, only son of Mr and Mrs R Kent, of 10 Brook Street, and Miss Hazel Musgrove, second daughter of Mr and Mrs F Musgrove, of 102 Whalley Road. Mr Ford was organist, and the hymns were “The Voice that breathed o’er Eden” and “Lead us, Heavenly Father.”

The bride, attired in a gown of heavy white satin with embroidered veil surmounted by a coronet of orange blossom and pearls, and carrying a bouquet of daffodils, was given away by her father. In attendance were Miss Nellie Hall (a friend) and Miss Mary Musgrove (sister). The former wore a blue taffeta dress trimmed with pink lace, with head-dress to tone. Her bouquet was of pink tulips. Miss Musgrove’s dress was of a heavy pink satin, with head-dress to tone, and she carried a Victorian posy.

The duties of best man and groomsman were carried out respectively by Mr Vincent O’Neill, the groom’s brother-in-law, and Master S Musgrove, brother of the bride. As the bride left the church she was presented with two silver horse-shoes by Master Robert Griffiths and Miss Patricia Lord.

The reception was held at The Craven Heifer Hotel, and later Mr and Mrs Kent left for their honeymoon at Charnford, Leicestershire. The bride travelled in a grey pinstriped costume and light coat with burgundy accessories.

The bridegroom gave the bride a handbag, his gifts to the bridesmaids being pearl ear-rings and a silver bracelet. The bride’s present to the bridegroom was a wristlet watch. Wedding gifts included an electric iron from No. 3 Shed, Westhead’s Mill, and an electric kettle, etc. from colleagues of the groom on the staff at Coplow.

Mr and Mrs Kent will reside at 95 Whalley Road, Clitheroe.

 

Sunday’s Obituary – Joseph Musgrove (1864-1948)

Joseph Musgrove is my great grand uncle – in other words, brother of my great grandfather. His parents are John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth – my 2x great grandparents.

Joseph was born on 13 April 1864 in Darwen, Lancashire.

I have Joseph on all the census returns from 1871 to 1911 and in the 1939 Register. For most of these years his occupation was given as “labourer”. So I am guessing that he had a very hard working life.

On 16 May 1891Joseph married Bridget Maria Grainger at St. James Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire.

James and Bridget had eleven children between 1892 and 1911. The local paper published a story marking their golden wedding anniversary in 1941 – see blog post here.

Joseph passed away on 3 June 1948 and details of his death were published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 11 June 1948.

Joseph Musgrove Obituary - CAT 11 Jun 1948.png

MR JOSEPH MUSGROVE

Mr Joseph Musgrove of 66, Wilkin Street, Clitheroe who died yesterday week in his 85th year was one of the town’s best known characters.

He was a native of Darwen, but had spent most of his life in Clitheroe and a for a long number of years was employed in the Highways Department of the Corporation, retiring in 1932. For many years he was one of town’s halberd bearers.

Mr Musgrove was keenly interested in cricket and football and in April travelled to Rochdale to watch Clitheroe Football Club’s last away match of the season.

He was a member of the Royal Castle Lodge Ancient Order of Foresters and members of the order were present at the interment on Tuesday at St Mary’s Cemetery, conducted by the Rev J T Hall.

Mr Musgrove leaves a widow, three sons and three daughters who will have general sympathy in their bereavement.

Military Monday – Henry John Grainger Musgrove (1892-1917)

Henry John Grainger Musgrove is my 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Joseph Musgrove and Bridget Maria Grainger. Our common ancestors are John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth, my 2x great grandparents.

Henry was the first of ten children by Joseph and Bridget. He was born on 9 April 1892 and baptised at St. James church, Clitheroe, Lancashire on 29 May 1892.

In the 1911 census Henry’s occupation was given as “baker”.

Unfortunately I haven’t been able to find any remaining records of Henry’s military service. However I know from the newspaper article below that he enlisted with the King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment on 11 December 1915. His service number was 21851 and at the time of his death on 24 June 1917 he was serving with the 7th Battalion.

The following article appeared in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 29 June 1917.

Henry J G Musgrove - CAT 29 June 1917

HOW PRIVATE H. MUSGROVE MET HIS DEATH

“It is my sad duty to write and inform you that I buried your son, yesterday (the 24th inst.). He was killed whilst with a working party, the previous night, and as our battalion is close at hand, Captain Kendall asked me to take charge of the burial. I expect the Authorities will inform you in due course, of the place of burial, and that they will erect a cross over his grave. Captain Kendall spoke in the very highest terms of your son’s bravery and usefulness as a soldier, and his death is much lamented by all his comrades. He has given his life for the greatest of all causes, and he now sleeps in an honoured grave, fondly remembered by all who knew him. May God bless and comfort you and all sorrowing relatives.”

The above letter, signed by the Rev. R. Kelso, Chaplain to the Royal Irish Rifles, has been received by Mr. Musgrove, Wilkin Street, and refers to his son, Private Hy. Musgrove, King’s Royal Lancaster Regt., who was 25 years of age, and enlisted on the 11th December, 1915. Deceased was well known throughout the district, being formerly in the employ of Mr. Dawson, Shaw Bridge. At the time he joined the Army, however, he was engaged as a baker for the Billington and Whalley Co-operative Society. He had been in France 13 months.

A couple of weeks later the following article was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 13 July 1917

Henry J G Musgrove - CAT 13 July 1917.png

PRIVATE HENRY J. G. MUSGROVE

Official confirmation of the death in action of Private Henry J. G. Musgrove, King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regt., was received on Friday last. He was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Musgrove, 66, Wilkin Street, a single man aged 25, and was, formerly employed by the Billington and Whalley Co-operative Society. He joined the forces in December, 1915, and went to France the following April. The circumstances under which he met death are given by his C.O. in a letter which is appended. Mr. and Mrs. Musgrove, who are to be commiserated with in their great loss, have two other sons in France, and one in training.

The first intimation of Private Musgrove’s untimely end came from Captain Pobert Kelso, Chaplain to the 13th Royal Irish Rifles: “It is my sad duty to wrote and inform you that I buried your son, yesterday (the 24th inst.). He was killed whilst with a working party, the previous night, ands our battalion is close at hand, Captain Kendall asked me to take charge of the burial. I expect the Authorities will inform you in due course, of the place of burial, and that they will erect a cross over his grave. Captain Kendall spoke in the very highest terms of your son’s bravery and usefulness as a soldier, and his death is much lamented by all his comrades. He has given his life for the greatest of all causes, and he now sleeps in an honoured grave, fondly remembered by all who knew him. May God bless and comfort you and all sorrowing relatives.”

Captain Kendall, writing on the 2nd inst., said: “It is with the deepest regret that I write to tell you, in case you have not already heard from other sources, of the death in action of your son, No. 21,851 Private Musgrove, of this regiment. He was killed while working in a trench at night, which work was part of the general operations in the Messines ridge. A shell landed in the midst of his party, causing immediate death to him and one of his comrades. I cannot tell you how sorry I am to lose him from my company, as he had many times proved himself a brave and valuable man. On one occasion, a few days before his death, he had volunteered to carry ammunition through heavy fire, and, altogether, was one of the men whom we could least afford to lose. I can only hope that the fact that he died a noble death, and also the fact that we miss him very much out here, may help to lighten your great sorrow.”

Private Musgrove had been connected with St. Mary’s Sunday School from childhood, and a hymn was sung to his memory and reference made to his death, on Sunday last. A memorial service, conducted by the Vicar, was held in the Church on Wednesday night.

Henry is buried at Wytschaete Military Cemetery in Belgium.

The following information is taken from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) website.

Wytschaete (now Wijtschate) was taken by the Germans early in November 1914. It was recovered by Commonwealth forces during the Battle of Messines on 7 June 1917, but fell into German hands once more on 16 April 1918. The village was recovered for the last time on 28 September. The cemetery was made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from isolated positions surrounding Wytschaete and the following small battlefield cemeteries:- REST AND BE THANKFUL FARM, KEMMEL: 23 UK burials (13 of them 2nd Suffolks), mostly of 1915. R.E. (BEAVER) FARM, KEMMEL: 18 Royal Engineer and four Canadian Engineer burials of 1915-1917. The CEMETERY NEAR ROSSIGNOL ESTAMINET, KEMMEL: 18 UK burials (11 of the 1st Wiltshire Regiment), of January-April 1915. SOMER FARM CEMETERY No.2, WYTSCHAETE: 13 UK burials made by IXth Corps in June 1917. GORDON CEMETERY, KEMMEL: 19 UK burials (14 of them 1st Gordon Highlanders) of January-May 1915. There are now 1,002 servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 673 of the burials are unidentified, but there are special memorials to 16 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials commemorate casualties known to have been buried at the Cemetery near Rossignol Estaminet, RE (Beaver) Farm and Rest and be Thankful Farm, whose graves could not be found on concentration. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

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Wytschaete Military Cemetery

The article published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 19 July 1917 refers to three other brothers of Henry – at that time two were already in France and the other was in training.

These brothers were James, Albert and Tom. I am very happy to say that all three survived the war.

The Clitheroe Advertiser and Times published another article about the family on 19 October 1917.

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There are some pleasant incidents even in France, amid all the horrors and suffering entailed by the carnage of war. One such happened last Friday, when brothers Tom and Jim Musgrove (sons of Mr. and Mrs. Musgrove, Wilkin Street), met for the first time in two years. Each has since written to his parents saying how well the other looked, and what a pleasure it was to meet after such a long interval. Jim, who is attached to the Lancs. Fusiliers, has been at the front two years, and Tom, who was on his way to the Blue Cross hospital with a horse when the unexpected meeting took place, has been out with the East Lancs. nine months. Mr. and Mrs. Musgrove lost a son, henry, in action, and a fourth son, Albert, is a driver in the R.F.A., and is also across the Channel.