Clitheroe

Joseph Frank Musgrove (1925-1987) – Cycle Accident

Joseph Frank Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. His parents are John Robert Turner Musgrove and Phoebe Scott. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner – my great grandparents.

Joseph was born on 2 November 1925 in Clitheroe, Lancashire. In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2, Joseph was living with his parents and brother at Hayhurst Street, Clitheroe.

In September 1941 Joseph was involved in a motor accident while riding his pedal cycle. Details of the accident were reported in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on Friday 19 September (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Joseph Frank Musgrove (1) - CAT 19 Sept 1941.png

An accident occurred on Friday, at the junction of Duck Street and Shaw Bridge Street, when a pedal cyclist, Joseph Frank Musgrove, a bobbin turner, residing at 32 Hayhurst Street, was knocked down by a motor car driven by John Brandwood, of 4 Rawley Street, Burnley. The unfortunate man’s left arm was fractured, or splintered. After receiving attention from Dr. Cooper he was taken home.

The case came to court on Thursday 25 September 1941 and the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times reported the outcome the next day.

Joseph Frank Musgrove (2) - CAT 26 Sept 1941.png

Collision Sequel

CONFLICT OF EVIDENCE: CASE DISMISSED.

“As there appears to be a conflict of evidence, we have decided to dismiss this case,” said Councillor French, presiding at the Borough Sessions, yesterday, when John Brandwood, a fitter, of 4 Rowley Street, Burnley, was summoned for driving without due care and attention and for failing to conform to a halt sign.
It was stated that defendant’s vehicle collided at the junction of Duck Street and Lowergate with a cycle ridden by Joseph Frank Musgrove (15), bobbin worker, of 32 Hayhurst Street, who was thrown from his machine, fracturing his left arm and bruising his leg.
Evidence was given by Mrs. Ida Gradwell, of Shaw Bridge House, and Thomas Ainsworth, of 44 Shaw Bridge Street, that defendant, who proceeded out of Duck Street, did not stop at the halt sign.
Defendant, who was represented by Mr. C. S. Corder, of Manchester, maintained that he did stop, but not at his usual place, because of the position of two other vehicles, and that Musgrove, who was riding at a fast speed, collided with his vehicle when it was travelling at only two miles an hour.
Corroborative evidence was given by John Wood, 31 Bank House Street, Burnley, and Eric Heyworth, 35 Myers Street, Burnley, who were passengers in defendant’s car.

Seems to me that Councillor French and others on the bench decided to take the easy option here.

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Wedding Wednesday – William Turner and Hilda Mallalieu

William Turner is my 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Alexander Turner and Jane Alice Brotherton. Our common ancestors are Thomas Turner and Mary Jane Carradice – my 2x great grandparents.

William was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire – his birth is registered in the September quarter of 1912.

William was on active service in WW2 and spent a number of years as a prisoner of war.

On 24 March 1951 William married Hilda Mallalieu at St. James’s Church, Clitheroe. The wedding was announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on Friday 30 March 1951 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Turner & Hilda Mallalieu - CAT 30 March 1951.png

TURNER – MALLALIEU

At St. James’s Church, Clitheroe, on Saturday, the marriage took place of Mr. William Turner, fourth son of Mrs. J. A. Turner, of 20 Whipp Avenue, Clitheroe, and Mrs. Hilda Mallalieu, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. Kenyon, 9 Lower Antley Street, Accrington.
The ceremony was performed by the Rev. A. Lord, rector, and the hymns “Lead Us Heavenly Father” and “O Perfect Love” were sung. Mr. G. Hitchen being organist.
Given away by her father, the bride wore a grey coat with hat to match and carried a bouquet of carnations.
Mr. C. A. Hall was best man and Messrs. G. Turner and H. Turner were groomsmen.
The reception was held at the Craven Heifer Hotel, Whalley Road. Mr. and Mrs. Turner are to reside at 15 Wilson Street, Clitheroe.
Wedding gifts included cheques from the Committee and members of the Clitheroe Central Working Men’s Club and from the staff and employees at the North Western Electricity Board.

Wedding Wednesday – William James Jones and Greta Turner

Greta Turner is my 1st cousin 2x removed. Her parents are Alexander Turner and Jane Alice Brotherton. Our common ancestors are Thomas Turner and Mary Jane Carradice – my 2x great grandparents.

Greta was born on 13 January 1919 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

On 10 August 1940 Greta married William James Jones at Moor Lane Methodst Church, Clitheroe. The wedding was announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on Friday 16 August 1940 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Jane Jones & Greta Turner - CAT 16 August 1940.png

JONES – TURNER

Private William James Jones, of the Royal Army Medical Corps, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Jones, of Thornton, near Blackpool, and Miss Greta Turner, third daughter of Mrs. and the late Mr. A. Turner, of 20 Whipp Avenue, Clitheroe, were married on Saturday, at the Moor Lane Methodist Church. The Rev. J. E. Storey, M.A., officiated, and as the bride was leaving the church, she was presented with a silver horse shoe by her niece, Miss Hazel Turner.
Given away by her brother-in-law, Mr. W. Woods, the bride was gowned in black figured marocain, trimmed with white organdie and lovers’ knots, and wore a black hat and shoes to tone, with a spray of white carnations. As bridesmaid, Miss Louisa Jones, sister of the bridegroom, was attired in a gown of Basque violet, edged with black, and wore black accessories, and a spray of white carnations. The best man was Mr. Kenneth Turner and Mr. Stanley Turner acted as groomsman. During the ceremony the hymns “The Voice that breathed o’er Eden” and “O Perfect Love” were sung, Mr. W. Taylor being at the organ.
A reception was held at the bride’s home and later the newly-married couple left for Cleveleys, the bride travelling in a black coat and hat, with gown to tone.
Amongst the presents was a chromium-plated tea pot from friends of the bride at the mill of Messrs. Longworth and Sons, Whalley. Mr. and Mrs. Jones will reside at 20 Whipp Avenue, Clitheroe.

Sunday’s Obituary – Alexander Turner (1884-1940)

Alexander Turner is my great grand uncle – a brother of my my great grandmother, Elizabeth Ann Turner. His parents are Thomas Turner and Mary Jane Carradice (my 2x great grandparents).

Alexander was born on 27 November 1884 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

In the 1901 census Alexander has an occupation as “rope minder (or winder) in coal mine”. He was listed as a patient in Leeds General Infirmary. I haven’t been able to find any information as to why he might have been in hospital – perhaps following an accident at work?

In the December quarter of 1904 Alexander married Jane Alice Brotherton in Clitheroe.

By the time of the 1911 census he was a labourer in a bobbin mill. Then in the 1939 Register (taken at the outbreak of WW2) he is described as a “wood turner”.

Over a period of 22 years – from 1905 to 1927 – Alexander and Jane had 12 children.

On 17 February 1940 Alexander passed away and was buried 4 days later at St. Mary’s Cemetery, Clitheroe. A brief notice of his death appeared in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on Friday 23 February 1940 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Alexander Turner - CAT 23 February 1940.png

Mr. Alexander Turner, 20 Whipp Avenue, who died on Saturday, had spent much the greater part of his fifty-five years in the service of Mr. Holden at the Albion shuttle and bobbin works, Back Common. The service at Wednesday’s interment at St. Mary’s Cemetery was conducted by the Rev. J. E. Storey, M.A. Mrs. Turner, left with six sons and four daughters, will have general sympathy.

Wedding Wednesday – John Stuart Tomkins and Ruth Margaret Bentley

Ruth Margaret Bentley is my 2nd cousin. Her parents are Albert Bentley and Ruth Halstead. Our common ancestors are Thomas Musgrove and Ellen Stowell – my great grandparents.

Ruth was born on 13 July 1934 in Clitheroe, Lancashire. Very sadly Ruth’s father, Albert, died at the age of 28 on 6 June 1937, when Ruth was one month away from her third birthday.

On 15 September 1956 Ruth married John Stuart Tomkins at Moor Lane Methodist Church, Clitheroe. The Clitheroe Advertiser and Times reported the wedding on Friday 21 September 1956 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

John S Tomkins & Ruth M Bentley - CAT 21 September 1956.png

TOMKINS – BENTLEY

The wedding took place at Moor Lane Methodist Church, Clitheroe, on Saturday, of Mr. John Stuart Tomkins, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Tomkins, of ‘Quarry Bank,” Lower Abbott’s Brow, Mellor, near Blackburn, and formerly of Waddington, and Miss Ruth Margaret Bentley, daughter of Mrs. and the late Mr. A. Bentley, of 1 Curzon Street, Clitheroe.
Given away by her uncle, Mr. Gordon Bentley, the bride wore a gown of ivory satin brocade with a short circular veil of embroidered net surmounted by a pearl and floral headdress. Her bouquet was of red roses.
Miss Christine Bentley, cousin of the bride, and Miss Marie Jackson, a friend, were the bridesmaids. They wore full-length dresses of pale blue brocade and wreaths of pink roses on their heads and carried matching bouquets.
Mr. Luke Porter, a friend of the bridegroom, was best man, and the duties of groomsman were shared by Messrs. Tom Hunt, H. T. Proctor, and John Howard.
During the ceremony which was performed by the Rev. G. H. Fenton, the hymns “The Lord’s My Shepherd” and “O Perfect Love” were sung. Mr. Donald Hartley was at the organ.
After a reception at the Starkie Arms Hotel, Clitheroe, the couple left for a honeymoon in London, the bride travelling in a tweed coat with red dress, handbag and shoes.
Among the gifts were a cheque from the bridegroom’s colleagues at Brockhall Hospital and a hand-embroidered tablecloth from the bride’s workfriends at the Brockhall staff school.
Mr. and Mrs. Tomkins will make their home at “Quarry Bank,” Lower Abbott’s Brow, Mellor.

Like her father, Ruth also died at a young age. She passed away on 28 December 1969 at only 35 years old. I posted a photograph of her tombstone here.

Wedding Wednesday – Allan Eastwood and Bertha (Betty) Procter

Bertha (Betty) Procter is my 1st cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Percy Procter and Annie Musgrove. Our common ancestors are Thomas Musgrove and Ellen Stowell – my great grandparents.

Betty was born on 31 December 1920 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

Three days before her 26th birthday, Betty married Allan Eastwood on 28 December 1946 at Moor Lane Methodist Church in Clitheroe. Details of the wedding were announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 3 January 1947 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Allan Eastwood & Bertha Procter - CAT 3 January 1947.png

EASTWOOD – PROCTER

The wedding took place at Moor Lane Methodist Church on Saturday, of Major Allan Eastwood, MBE, eldest son of Mr and Mrs E Eastwood, 33 Collingwood Road, Chorley, and an old boy of Clitheroe Grammar School, and Miss Betty Procter, only daughter of Mrs A Procter, 11 Brownlow Street, Clitheroe.
The Rev J S Yearsley, MA, officiated, and Mr R Halstead, uncle of the bride, was at the organ. The hymn “O God of Love” was sung during the service.
Given away by her brother, Mr H T Procter, of Nottingham, the bride was dressed in ivory figured slipper satin, with a veil of Brussels lace forming a train, and a coronet of orange blossom. She carried a double sheaf of cream carnations.
She was attended by a friend, Miss Ethel Whittam, of Marple, who wore a dress of midnight-blue figure cloque with a Juliet cap trimmed with pink chrysanthemums. On leaving the church the bride was presented with a lucky horse-shoe by her nephew, Master Malcolm Procter.
The best man was Mr J Marsh, of Burnley, who deputised for Lieut. Fred Eastwood, the bridegroom’s brother, at present serving in East Africa. Mr H Musgrove was groomsman.
After the ceremony a reception was held at the Spread Eagle Hotel, Sawley, and later the couple left for their honeymoon in Devon and Cornwall. For the journey, the bride wore a red coat, black hat and black accessories.
Major and Mrs Eastwood gave the bridesmaid a double string of pearls. Among the presents was a cheque from the staff of Clitheroe Shirtings, Grindleton.
Major and Mrs Eastwood are shortly to leave for Melbourne, Australia, where Major Eastwood is to take up an appointment with a textile firm. They will reside temporarily at 11 Brownlow Street, Clitheroe.

Wedding Wednesday – Mary Musgrove and Laurence O’Hagan

Mary Musgrove is my aunty. Her parents are Fred Ainsworth Stowell Musgrove and Florrie Musgrove – my maternal grandparents.

Mary married Laurence O’Hagan on 15 September 1956 in Clitheroe, Lancashire. The wedding was announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on Friday 21 September 1956 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

 

O’HAGAN – MUSGROVE

The wedding took place at SS. Michael and John’s Church, Clitheroe, on Saturday of Mr. Laurence O’Hagan, third son of Mr. and Mrs. P. O’Hagan, of 8 The Crescent, Clitheroe, and Miss Mary Musgrove, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. Musgrove, of 102 Whalley Road, Clitheroe.
The bride, given away by her father, wore a gown of white lace over tulle. Her bouquet was of white roses.
Mrs. Alice Dawson, sister of the bride, was matron of honour, and the Misses Lynn Dawson and Carol Musgrove, nieces of the bride, and Miss Patricia O’Hagan, niece of the bridegroom, were the bridesmaids.
Mrs. Dawson wore a gown of lemon-coloured net over taffeta and the bridesmaids dresses were of lemon-coloured organza over taffeta. They carried Victorian posies of mixed flowers.
Mr. P. O’Hagan, the bridegroom’s brother was best man, the bride’s brothers, Messrs. Harry and Tom Musgrove, sharing the duties of groomsman.
The Rev. Father F. Hannan, S.J., officiated at the ceremony and Mr. K. Sherliker was at the organ.
After a reception at the Station Hotel, Clitheroe, Mr. and Mrs. O’Hagan left for a honeymoon at Blackpool, the bride travelling in a tweed coat with tan accessories.
Mr. and Mrs. O’Hagan will reside at 1 Derby Street, Clitheroe.