Clitheroe

Travel Tuesday – Annie Procter (nee Musgrove) – Australian Adventure

Annie Musgrove is my grand aunt. She was born on 26 March 1895 in Clitheroe, Lancashire, to parents Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell – my great grandparents.

Annie married Percy Procter in Clitheroe on 14 June 1919.

I have recently found the following the newspaper article in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 13 June 1956 in which they recount Annie’s recent extended stay in Australia….on doctors orders!!

Annie Procter - CAT 13 January 1956.png

BACK HOME AFTER 7 YEARS IN AUSTRALIA

A grand sunny climate, but….

“Follow the doctor’s advice” might well be the moral of this story of a rejuvenated 61-year-old Mrs Annie Procter, who recently arrived back in Clitheroe, after seven years in Australia.

It was in August, 1948, that Mrs Procter was advised by her doctor to go and live with her married daughter in Australia – for health reasons.

And so Mrs Procter set out on her first sea trip – a voyage across the world. And what a rough trip it turned out to be, too. But Mrs Procter enjoyed the buffetings of the ship in the rough waters of the Indian Ocean – much to the disgust of her less fortunate fellow passengers.

Her destination was Moorabbin, a suburb of Melbourne, where she lived with her daughter, Betty, now Mrs B Eastwood, and family. Mrs Procter spent five years at the seaside town of Parkdale, where the climate proved entirely to her liking.

In fact, the improvements in Mrs Procter’s health was so rapid, that six months after landing in Australia she started work in the mending department of a woollen mill at Bentleigh, near Moorabbin, and continued working without a break until coming back to this country.

BEHIND TIMES

Her general opinion of Australia? “Well behind the times,” says Mrs Procter. “They have a lot to learn, yet.”

Climate? – No complaints, naturally, in view of its recuperative powers.

Housing? – The drawback with new housing estates is that drainage and sewerage is not carried out until years after the completion of the building. Consequently, tenants are faced with ankle-deep mud covering the unmade roads after rain.

Litter? – Australians are definitely not litter-conscious.

Licensing laws? – Peculiar. The present hours, 9am to 6 pm are responsible for queer happenings.

Such as the occasion when a young couple, friends of Mrs Procter, went to a ball. In their car they took a zipped bag filled with bottles – a portable bar for use during the evening.

It is quite a common sight to see hotels besieged by workers (who finish at 5pm) and the same people emerging at 6pm carrying liquid refreshment to be enjoyed at home.

Cost of living? – The biggest drain on people’s wages out there is clothing and furnishings, which are exceedingly costly.

Mrs Procter, who is living with her sister and brother-in-law, Mr and Mrs Robert Halstead, at their grocery shop in Curzon Street, greatly enjoyed the voyage back to England – “an absolute contrast to the outward trip” – calling at various ports en route, including Naples where she visited the ruins of Pompeii.

Though she has decided to settle down for the time being in Clitheroe, Mrs procter still feels the urge to travel. And no wonder. “After the Australian trip, I feel 20 years younger,” she says.

An interesting personal reflection on life in Australia 50+ years ago.

Here is what Wikipedia has to say about Moorabbin in Australia now.

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Wedding Wednesday – Ellen Musgrove and Robert Halstead

Ellen Musgrove is my grand aunt – in other words my grandad’s sister. Her parents are Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell, my great grandparents.

Ellen was born on 21 February 1881 in Clitheroe, Lancashire. Robert Halstead was born on 31 October 1880, also in Clitheroe.

Ellen and Robert were married on 21 Jun 1902.

On the occasion of their golden wedding anniversary in 1952 the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times published the following article on 20 June.

Ellen Musgrove & Robert Halstead Golden Wedding.png

Clitheroe Couple Married 50 Years

A quiet family celebration at home tomorrow will mark 50 years of married life for Mr and Mrs Robert Halstead, of 1 Curzon Street, Clitheroe.

Mr Halstead, who is 71, is well known to many Clitheronians. He was born in Curzon Street, next door to his present home, and has lived in the street all his life – except for seven years after his marriage, when he resided in Monk Street, just around the corner.

He has always taken an interest in music, and was organist at the Congregational Church, Clitheroe, for five years during the war. He was pianist at the Sunday meetings of the old P.S.A. in Clitheroe, and will be remembered my many as pianist in a dance band led by Mr Joe Margerison.

AT THE MILL

Mr Halstead, who, like his wife, worked at Foulsykes Mill for a number of years, had latterly been employed at Sun Street Mill, as an overlooked. He retired in 1947.

He is associated with Moor Lane Methodist Church, and is an enthusiastic member of the Castle Park Veterans’ Bowling Club, with whom he has played on several occasions.

His wife, Mrs Ellen Halstead, formerly Miss Musgrove, was employed as a weaver at Foulsykes Mill many years ago, and later ran the mixed business at their home.

Mr and Mrs Halstead, who were married at the old Baptist Chapel in Shaw Bridge by the Rev L J Shackleford, have one daughter and one grandchild.

Wedding Wednesday – John Robert Turner Musgrove and Jean James

John Robert Turner Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. His parents are John Robert Musgrove and Phoebe Scott. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

John (Jack) was born on 17 July 1916 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

In the 1939 Register John’s occupation is listed as “carpenter’s labourer”. He was living at home with his parents.

On the 17 June 1943 John married Jean James in Axbridge, Somerset. Details of the wedding were published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 25 June 1943.

John R Musgrove & Jean James Marriage.png

MUSGROVE-JAMES

Private Jack Musgrove, King’s Own Royal Regiment, eldest son of Mr and Mrs J Musgrove, 32 Hayhurst Street, Clitheroe, was married yesterday week, at St John’s Church, Axbridge, to Miss Jean James, youngest daughter of Mr and Mrs P James, 17 Parkfield, Axbridge, Somerset.

The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a white satin dress designed on Tudor lines, with an embroidered veil and wreath of orange-blossom. She carried a bouquet of red roses. Miss Nancy James, the bride’s sister, was the bridesmaid, and her dress was in floral satin, with lace head-dress to tone. Her bouquet was composed of blue cynthias.

Mr Joseph Musgrove, brother of the groom, undertook the duties of best man, whilst those of groomsman were carried out by Mr Joseph Waterhouse, brother-in-law of the bridegroom.

A pendant was the bridegroom’s gift to the bride, and he received from her a wrist watch. He gave a cheque to the bridesmaid.

After the reception, which was held at the home of the bride, the newly-married pair travelled to Mr Musgrove’s home town for the honeymoon, the bride wearing a floral gown, with a grey coat and hat to match.

Amongst the many presents were a canteen of cutlery and silk bedspread from work friends of the bride.

Previous to joining the Forces, three and and a half years ago, Mr Musgrove was employed at Whiteacre Camp, Barrow, and he was very well known in the district as a trumpet player, having been associated with the Borough Band and local dance bands.

After the end of the war John and Jean lived in Somerset and had three children.

Sunday’s Obituary – Mary Alice Musgrove (1887-1952)

Mary Alice Musgrove is my grand aunt – in other words my grandad’s sister. Her parents are Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell, my great grandparents.

Mary was born on 14 December 1887 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

I have Mary in all the census returns from 1891 to 1911 and in the 1939 Register. I can see from these documents that Mary was employed all her working life as a “cotton weaver”.

Mary passed away on 31 October 1952.

The following two articles were published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 7 November 1952.

Mary Alice Musgrove Obituary 1.png

Neighbour’s Find

When Miss Mary Alice Musgrove (65), of 11 Brownlow Street, Clitheroe, did not go to work as usual on Friday morning, neighbours became worried and at lunch time one of them broke into the house and found her lying dead at the foot of the stairs, still in her night attire.

Miss Musgrove lived alone and was employed as a weaver at Sun Street Mill.

A post mortem was held but an inquest was found to be unnecessary.

 

Mary Alice Musgrove Obituary 2.pngMISS M A MUSGROVE

The cremation took place at Skipton on Wednesday of Miss Mary Alice Musgrove of 11 Brownlow Street, Clitheroe, who died suddenly, after a short illness, at her home on Friday. In accordance with her wish, her ashes were later scattered on Pendle Hill.

Miss Musgrove, who was 65, was employed for most of her working life at Jubilee Mill. She worked for some time at Foulsykes Mill, and, since it closed 10 years ago, she had been a weaver at Sun Street Mill.

Her two brothers and two sisters will have deep sympathy in their loss.

Sunday’s Obituary – Bridget Maria Musgrove (nee Grainger)

Bridget Maria Musgrove (nee Grainger) was the wife of my great grand uncle, Joseph Musgrove.

,Bridget has had a few mentions in my blog previously – herehereherehere, and here.

She was born on 23 February 1867. After marrying Joseph on 16 May 1891 in Clitheroe, Lancashire, the couple had eleven children between 1892 and 1911.

Bridget passed away on 10 November 1956. The following death notice was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 16 November 1956.

Bridget Maria Musgrove Obituary.png

MRS B M MUSGROVE

One of the oldest members of the Mothers’ Union at Clitheroe Parish Church, Mrs Bridget Maria Musgrove, of 35 Hayhurst Street, Clitheroe, died at her home on Saturday.

Born in West Leigh, Somerset, 89 years ago, Mrs Musgrove came to Clitheroe as a child. Her husband, the late Mr Joseph Musgrove, was a Corporation halberd bearer for many years.

A service was held in the Parish Church prior to interment at Clitheroe Cemetery on Wednesday. The Vicar, the Rev S Birtwell, and the curate, the Rev I D H Robins, officiated.

Mrs Musgrove leaves three sons and three daughters to whom general sympathy will be expressed.

Sunday’s Obituary – Joseph Musgrove (1864-1948)

Joseph Musgrove is my great grand uncle – in other words, brother of my great grandfather. His parents are John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth – my 2x great grandparents.

Joseph was born on 13 April 1864 in Darwen, Lancashire.

I have Joseph on all the census returns from 1871 to 1911 and in the 1939 Register. For most of these years his occupation was given as “labourer”. So I am guessing that he had a very hard working life.

On 16 May 1891Joseph married Bridget Maria Grainger at St. James Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire.

James and Bridget had eleven children between 1892 and 1911. The local paper published a story marking their golden wedding anniversary in 1941 – see blog post here.

Joseph passed away on 3 June 1948 and details of his death were published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 11 June 1948.

Joseph Musgrove Obituary - CAT 11 Jun 1948.png

MR JOSEPH MUSGROVE

Mr Joseph Musgrove of 66, Wilkin Street, Clitheroe who died yesterday week in his 85th year was one of the town’s best known characters.

He was a native of Darwen, but had spent most of his life in Clitheroe and a for a long number of years was employed in the Highways Department of the Corporation, retiring in 1932. For many years he was one of town’s halberd bearers.

Mr Musgrove was keenly interested in cricket and football and in April travelled to Rochdale to watch Clitheroe Football Club’s last away match of the season.

He was a member of the Royal Castle Lodge Ancient Order of Foresters and members of the order were present at the interment on Tuesday at St Mary’s Cemetery, conducted by the Rev J T Hall.

Mr Musgrove leaves a widow, three sons and three daughters who will have general sympathy in their bereavement.

Sunday’s Obituary – John Robert Turner Musgrove (1891-1944)

John Robert Turner Musgrove is my grand uncle – in other words my grandmother’s brother. His parents are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

John was born on 2 November 1891 in Giggleswick, Yorkshire. He was baptised almost two years later on 5 October 1893 at Horton in Ribblesdale, Yorkshire. He was the oldest of at least ten children.

By the time of the 1901 census the family had moved south to Lancashire and were living in Clitheroe. When the next census was taken in 1911 John was working as a “bleacher” in a calico cloth print works.

In 1915 John married Phoebe Scott. They had three children:-

John Robert Turner Musgrove – 17 July 1916
Greta Musgrove – 2 May 1918
Joseph Frank Musgrove – 2 November 1925

When the 1939 Register was taken John’s occupation is given as “shoe repairer”. The family were living at 32 Hayhurst Street, Clitheroe.

John died on 27 February 1944 and his death was reported in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 3 March 1944.

John Robert Turner Musgrove - Death Notice CAT 1944.png

MR J R T MUSGROVE

The death occurred on Sunday of Mr John Robert Turner Musgrove, 32 Hayhurst Street, Clitheroe, at the age of 52. A native of Giggleswick Mr Musgrove came to Clitheroe when in his teens, and for some time he was employed at Barrow Printworks. Later, he began business as a clogger in Shaw Bridge and in recent years he had worked in the quarry. Mr Musgrove, who was wounded in the last war, was a member of the British Legion. Another brother, Thomas, made the supreme sacrifice, whilst a younger brother is serving now. Mr Musgrove’s two sons are both in the Forces.

Sincere sympathy will be given to his wife, sons and daughter in their bereavement. Mr Musgrove was associated with the Moor Lane Methodist Church, whose minister, the Rev J E Storey, officiated at the interment, yesterday, at St Mary’s Cemetery.