Wedding Wednesday – Albert Kent and Hazel Musgrove

Hazel Musgrove is my aunty – her parents are Fred Ainsworth Stowell Musgrove and Florrie Musgrove.

Hazel was born on 31 January 1925 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

On 5 April 1947 Hazel married Albert Kent at St James Church, Clitheroe. The wedding was announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 11 April 1947.

Kent - Musgrove 1.png

 

Kent - Musgrove 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KENT – MUSGROVE

On Saturday, at St James’s Church, the Rector (Rev Alexander Lord) solemnised the wedding of Mr Albert Kent, only son of Mr and Mrs R Kent, of 10 Brook Street, and Miss Hazel Musgrove, second daughter of Mr and Mrs F Musgrove, of 102 Whalley Road. Mr Ford was organist, and the hymns were “The Voice that breathed o’er Eden” and “Lead us, Heavenly Father.”

The bride, attired in a gown of heavy white satin with embroidered veil surmounted by a coronet of orange blossom and pearls, and carrying a bouquet of daffodils, was given away by her father. In attendance were Miss Nellie Hall (a friend) and Miss Mary Musgrove (sister). The former wore a blue taffeta dress trimmed with pink lace, with head-dress to tone. Her bouquet was of pink tulips. Miss Musgrove’s dress was of a heavy pink satin, with head-dress to tone, and she carried a Victorian posy.

The duties of best man and groomsman were carried out respectively by Mr Vincent O’Neill, the groom’s brother-in-law, and Master S Musgrove, brother of the bride. As the bride left the church she was presented with two silver horse-shoes by Master Robert Griffiths and Miss Patricia Lord.

The reception was held at The Craven Heifer Hotel, and later Mr and Mrs Kent left for their honeymoon at Charnford, Leicestershire. The bride travelled in a grey pinstriped costume and light coat with burgundy accessories.

The bridegroom gave the bride a handbag, his gifts to the bridesmaids being pearl ear-rings and a silver bracelet. The bride’s present to the bridegroom was a wristlet watch. Wedding gifts included an electric iron from No. 3 Shed, Westhead’s Mill, and an electric kettle, etc. from colleagues of the groom on the staff at Coplow.

Mr and Mrs Kent will reside at 95 Whalley Road, Clitheroe.

 

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Sunday’s Obituary – Robert Halstead (1880-1957)

Robert Halstead is the husband of my grand aunt, Ellen Musgrove.

I have written about Robert and Ellen before – here – with a report celebrating their golden wedding anniversary in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 20 June 1952.

Robert passed away on 21 January 1957 and his obituary was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 25 January.

Robert Halstead - CAT 25 January 1957.png

Well known among the older generation of Clitheronians, Mr Robert Halstead, of 1 Curzon Street, Clitheroe, died at his home on Monday. He was 76.

Mr Halstead, who was born in the street in which he died, was a keen musician. He was pianist in the band led by the late Mr Joe Margerison and also entertained at concerts at Clitheroe Old People’s Club, of which he was a member. During the war he was organist at the Congregational Church.

He was also interested in football and bowling, and for some years was secretary of the Castle Park Veterans’ Bowling Club.

Mr Halstead, an overlooker until his retirement 10 years ago, ws associated with Moor Lane Methodist Church. He was chief ranger for the Ancient Order of Foresters, Court Royal Castle.

During the first World War he served as a Special Constable and was awarded a medal for long service.

Mr Halstead had not been well for some months, and sympathy is extended to his widow and daughter in their bereavement.

The Rev. J H Fenton officiated at the funeral at Clitheroe Cemetery yesterday.

Workday Wednesday – James Musgrove (1901-1983)

James Musgrove is my grand uncle – brother of my grandmother Florrie Musgrove.

James was born on 9 April 1901 in Clitheroe, Lancashire – the fifth of ten children to my great grandparents Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner.

At the age of 18 James married Edith Jane Hibble on 27 October 1919.

In the 1939 Register James is presumably away doing his bit for the war. Edith is at home living at 51 Woone Lane, Clitheroe.

James came home safely from WW2 and at some point afterwards started working for the Post Office. I know from the following newspaper article that he drove a Post Office van – and in this instance he had a lucky escape.

James Musgrove - CAT 11 March 1955.png

Mail Van Overturns

On the way from Blackburn with Clitheroe’s morning mail, early on Friday, a Post Office motor van skidded on a slippery toad surface at Barrow, turned a half circle, struck the pavement and overturned on its side.

The driver, James Musgrove, aged 53, of 51 Woone Lane, Clitheroe, escaped with bruises about the arms and back.

The mail was transferred to another vehicle and there was no delay in the morning delivery in Clitheroe.

Sunday’s Obituary – Susannah Musgrove (1856-1869)

Susannah Musgrove is my great grand aunt – a sister of my great grandfather Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove.

Susannah was born on 2 August 1856 at Over Darwen, Lancashire. She was the first of five children born to my 2x great grandparents John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth.

I had known for a long time that Susannah died young at the age of 12. However I have only just found a newspaper article with details of the circumstances of her death. This report is from the Preston Herald of 6 February 1869.

Susannah Musgrove - Preston Herald 6 February 1869.png

A GIRL KILLED AT THE BELGRAVE PAPER STAINING WORKS

On Monday afternoon a fatal accident happened to a girl named Susannah Musgrove, aged 12 years, daughter of Mr John Musgrove, who was employed as a short time tearer in connection with the block printing department. It appears that she had been to school on Monday afternoon, and on returning called at the print shop to see if her master was there, and was seen playing about in the room on the second floor. About 5.40pm a man named Joseph Riding had occasion to use the hoist, which is in one corner of the room, and used for the purpose of raising goods from one room to another. As the hoist did not descend lower than the second floor, the man Riding went to see what was the cause. On getting there he found the deceased laid down on her belly on the floor, with her head underneath the hoist. The hoist was at once raised, but the unfortunate girl was dead. She must have been in the act of looking down the hoist way into the lower room, and therefore could not see the hoist when descending. An inquest will be held on the body.

You know sometimes you just wonder how much tragedy one family can have.

Susannah’s grandfather, Joseph Musgrove (my 3x great grandfather) died in 1858 as the result of a fall at home when he dislocated his neck. I blogged about this here.

John Musgrove, Susannah’s father, committed suicide in 1884 – see blog post here.

Of the five children that were born to John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth only two survived to adulthood – Thomas and Joseph.

Susannah died as the result of the accident. Her brother George died on the day he was born 20 August 1857. And another brother, James, died at three months old in 1868.

So sad.

Travel Tuesday – Annie Procter (nee Musgrove) – Australian Adventure

Annie Musgrove is my grand aunt. She was born on 26 March 1895 in Clitheroe, Lancashire, to parents Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell – my great grandparents.

Annie married Percy Procter in Clitheroe on 14 June 1919.

I have recently found the following the newspaper article in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 13 June 1956 in which they recount Annie’s recent extended stay in Australia….on doctors orders!!

Annie Procter - CAT 13 January 1956.png

BACK HOME AFTER 7 YEARS IN AUSTRALIA

A grand sunny climate, but….

“Follow the doctor’s advice” might well be the moral of this story of a rejuvenated 61-year-old Mrs Annie Procter, who recently arrived back in Clitheroe, after seven years in Australia.

It was in August, 1948, that Mrs Procter was advised by her doctor to go and live with her married daughter in Australia – for health reasons.

And so Mrs Procter set out on her first sea trip – a voyage across the world. And what a rough trip it turned out to be, too. But Mrs Procter enjoyed the buffetings of the ship in the rough waters of the Indian Ocean – much to the disgust of her less fortunate fellow passengers.

Her destination was Moorabbin, a suburb of Melbourne, where she lived with her daughter, Betty, now Mrs B Eastwood, and family. Mrs Procter spent five years at the seaside town of Parkdale, where the climate proved entirely to her liking.

In fact, the improvements in Mrs Procter’s health was so rapid, that six months after landing in Australia she started work in the mending department of a woollen mill at Bentleigh, near Moorabbin, and continued working without a break until coming back to this country.

BEHIND TIMES

Her general opinion of Australia? “Well behind the times,” says Mrs Procter. “They have a lot to learn, yet.”

Climate? – No complaints, naturally, in view of its recuperative powers.

Housing? – The drawback with new housing estates is that drainage and sewerage is not carried out until years after the completion of the building. Consequently, tenants are faced with ankle-deep mud covering the unmade roads after rain.

Litter? – Australians are definitely not litter-conscious.

Licensing laws? – Peculiar. The present hours, 9am to 6 pm are responsible for queer happenings.

Such as the occasion when a young couple, friends of Mrs Procter, went to a ball. In their car they took a zipped bag filled with bottles – a portable bar for use during the evening.

It is quite a common sight to see hotels besieged by workers (who finish at 5pm) and the same people emerging at 6pm carrying liquid refreshment to be enjoyed at home.

Cost of living? – The biggest drain on people’s wages out there is clothing and furnishings, which are exceedingly costly.

Mrs Procter, who is living with her sister and brother-in-law, Mr and Mrs Robert Halstead, at their grocery shop in Curzon Street, greatly enjoyed the voyage back to England – “an absolute contrast to the outward trip” – calling at various ports en route, including Naples where she visited the ruins of Pompeii.

Though she has decided to settle down for the time being in Clitheroe, Mrs procter still feels the urge to travel. And no wonder. “After the Australian trip, I feel 20 years younger,” she says.

An interesting personal reflection on life in Australia 50+ years ago.

Here is what Wikipedia has to say about Moorabbin in Australia now.

Sundays Obituary – Susannah Gawthrop (1830-1907)

Susannah Gawthrop (nee Benson) is the wife of my 2nd great grand uncle. In other words she married a brother of my 2x great grandmother (Ellen Gawthrop)

Susannah Benson was born on 16 October 1830 in Cowling, West Yorkshire.

Sometime in the September quarter of 1852  Susannah married Joseph Gawthrop. Over the next twenty years Joseph and Susannah had eight children.

Their first child, John, became a well known Wesleyan Methodist minister. I have written about John before – here and here.

Joseph and Susannah lived in Cowling all their lives. Joseph’s occupation in the census returns from 1861 to 1891 was a farmer at Green Syke, Cowling.

On 25 April 1900 Joseph passed away and was buried three days later at Holy Trinity Church, Cowling.

According to the census return for 1901 Susannah was still living at Green Syke with her youngest son Alfred and his family – Alfred now appears to be running the farm.

Very sadly tragedy struck on Friday 22 November 1907. The Bradford Daily Telegraph published the following story on 25 November.

Susannah Gawthrop (Benson) - Bradford Daily Telegraph 25 November 1907.png

Bradford Daily Telegraph taken from British Newspaper Archives

BURNING FATALITY AT COWLING

OLD LADY’S SAD DEATH

On Friday night Mrs Susannah Gawthrop, of Cowling, was reading a newspaper by candle light, when the paper caught fire.

In a few minutes she was in flames, and sustained severe injuries, being badly burned about the neck, face and arms. Death took place on Saturday night.

Mrs Gawthrop who was in her 76th year, was the mother of the Rev. John Gawthrop, a popular Wesleyan minister at Huntingdon.

The tragic incident has caused quite a sensation in the village, and general sympathy has been extended to the relatives on all hands.

A Coroners Inquest was held at the Cowling Liberal Club on 25 November 1907. The verdict was that death was caused “By misadventure, set fire to her clothing causing death by shock the next day”.

Susannah Gawthrop - Inquest 25 November 1907.jpg

Coroners Notebooks 1852-1909 taken from http://www.ancestry.co.uk

Susannah was buried on 28 November 1907 at Holy Trinity Church, Cowling.

Workday Wednesday – Smith Buckley (1848-1913)

Smith Buckley is my 1st cousin 3x removed. Our common ancestors are Thomas Buckley and Henrietta Mason, my 3x great grandparents. That makes Smith a nephew of my 2x great grandparents James Buckley and Sarah Tattersall.

Smith was born sometime in the first quarter of 1848 in Bingley, West Yorkshire. He was the second of seven children to William Buckley and Mary Heaps.

Sometime in the second quarter of 1867 Smith married Margaret Day in Bradford, West Yorkshire. Over the next 21 years they had seven children.

In the 1871 census Smith is working as a “mechanic”. I know from the following newspaper article that at some point in the next eight years he started working for Geo. Hattersley & Sons as “foreman mechanic”.

On Monday 30 December 1878 Smith was involved in a very nasty accident at work. The Keighley News reported on the event on 4 January 1879.

Smith Buckley - Keighley News 4 January 1879.png

Taken from the British Newspaper Archive website

HAWORTH

A VERY NARROW ESCAPE – A man named Smith Buckley (30), living at Spring Row, Haworth, who works as foreman mechanic for Messrs Geo Hattersley and sons, at Mytholmes Mill, had a marvellously narrow escape from being fatally injured while at work on Monday morning. The mill is partially worked by water-power, and during the recent frost a large water-wheel, which is in constant use, had been stationary. The thaw caused it to move again, the buckets being full of snow, and a segment in one of the chain of wheels was broken. While Buckley and another workman were attending to it, props were used to retain it in position, and as one piece of wood was being substituted for another, the support gave way, and Buckley was caught between the wall and one of the spokes of the revolving wheel. He managed to shift himself into a less perilous position before the next spoke came round, but he was taken round with the wheel four or five times before it came to a stand, only narrowly avoiding a fatal termination to the accident. The inhabitants of Spring Row, which is opposite, saw the whole occurrence. The unfortunate man, whose left leg was shattered below the knee in a shocking manner, was conveyed to the Keighley Cottage Hospital, where Dr. Jack, who attended to him, found amputation at the knee joint necessary. He had also sustained severe bruises all over the body, but there were no other fractures. The case is progressing favourably towards recovery. The injured man has a wife and four children depending on him.

I think it’s fair to say that life was going to be very much more difficult for Smith and his family after the accident and the loss of his leg. So this must have been a very worrying time for them.

I know from another newspaper report that Smith was a member of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers (ASE). The history of the union can be traced back to the formation of the Journeymen Steam Engine, Machine Makers’ and Millwrights’ Friendly Society, in 1826, popularly known as the “Old Mechanics”.

In 1920 the ASE was one of several unions that came together to form the Amalgamated Engineering Union (AEU).

Anyway, back to Smith, and life after his accident.

On the 4 May 1880 the Bradford Observer reported on a meeting the previous evening of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers.

Smith Buckley - Bradford Observer 4 May 1880.png

Taken from the British Newspaper Archive website

THE AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

Yesterday evening, a large meeting was held in the hall of the Mechanics’ Institute, Keighley. The meeting was convened by the members of the Keighley Branch of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers, for the purpose of presenting Mr Smith Buckley, of Haworth, one of their members, who met with an accident which caused the loss of his leg, with the sum of £100. Mr J Summerscales, of Keighley, occupied the chair, and impressed upon his audience the necessity for rendering better support to the Cottage Hospital in the town. Mr John Burnett, general secretary to the London society, spoke of the benefit which trades unions had had in raising the position of the working classes and in improving the trade of the country. Mr D Guile, of London, also addressed the meeting. Mr Henry Mitchell, president of the Bradford Chamber of Commerce, made the presentation, and spoke of the relation of England with foreign countries. The usual complimentary votes brought the meeting to a close.

Over the next thirty years Smith had various occupations listed in the census returns:-

1881 – Beerhouse keeper at the Princess Hotel, Duncan Street, Bradford. He made the newspapers again during his time as landlord for allowing drunkeness on his premises.

1891 – Furniture broker

1901 – Machine fitter

1911 – Textile fitter

I have enormous pride and respect for Smith. It seems as though he was courageous, determined and very hard working.

Smith died at the age of 65 and was buried in Utley Cemetery, Keighley on 9 July 1913.