Wedding Wednesday

Wedding Wednesday – Leonard Miller and Elizabeth J Musgrove

Elizabeth Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. Her parents are James Musgrove and Edith Jane Hibble. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

Elizabeth was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire in 1920 – her birth is registered in the June quarter.

Elizabeth married Leonard Miller on 27 December 1941 at Clitheroe Congregational church. The wedding was reported in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 2 January 1942.

Leonard Miller & Elizabeth Musgrove Wedding.png

MILLER – MUSGROVE

The wedding took place at the Congregational Church, on Saturday, of Mr Len Miller, eldest son of Mr and Mrs Miller, of Stalybridge, and Miss Betty Musgrove, eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs Musgrove, of 51 Woone Lane, Clitheroe. The bridegroom is a member of the Halifax Police Force, whilst the bride is a nurse at the Halifax General Hospital. The ceremony was performed by the Rev J A Sinclair.

Given away by her uncle, Mr Fred Hibble, the bride was attired in an ice-blue two-piece suit, trimmed with fur, with brown hat and accessories, and a spray of pink carnations. As matron of honour, Mrs M Lord, the bride’s sister, wore a blue two-piece suit, trimmed with fur, and had brown accessories and a spray of pink carnations. Mr Stanley Miller was best man and Mr Jack Black was groomsman. A reception was held at the Starkie Arms.

Mr and Mrs Miller will reside at Halifax.

I assume that Elizabeth (Betty) was given away by her uncle because her father was away on military service in WW2.

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Wedding Wednesday – Richard Jacomb Pitt and Diana Fay Lovel Mack

Diana Fay Lovel Mack is my 4th cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Lovel Durant Mack and Hilda Muriel Watkinson. Our common ancestors are Anthony Mason and Mary Brayshaw, my 4x great grandparents.

Diana was born in Liverpool, Lancashire in 1925 – her birth is registered in the December quarter.

A report of Diana’s marriage to Richard Jacomb Pitt on 16 March 1946 was published in the Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette on 23 March 1946.

Diana Mack & Richard Pitt wedding.png

MARRIED IN LONDON

CHESHIRE BRIDE FOR LT. R J PITT

A large number of friends of Col. and Mrs R B Pitt and their family travelled from Bath last Saturday to attend the wedding in London of Lieut. Richard J Pitt, MBE, RN, to Miss Diana Fay Lovel Mack.

The bridegroom is the eldest son of Col. and Mrs Pitt, who live at Middle Twinhoe Farm, Midford, and his bride is the only daughter of Mr and Mrs Lovel Mack, Massey Lodge, Sandiway, Cheshire.

The bride was on the staff of the Foreign Office during the war. Lieut. Pitt’s MBE was awarded for bravery and skill in damage control in the assault area off the Normandy beaches during the invasion of the Continent. He was serving on a destroyer.

The choral ceremony took place at St George’s, Hanover Square, the Rev F E S Jacomb-Hood, cousin of the bridegroom, officiating, assisted by the vicar.

The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, wore a lovely gown of silver brocade, with a train of white satin trimmed with true lovers’ knots in silver brocade, and white heather. She had fresh white flowers in her hair and carried a bouquet of white spring flowers. Her jewellery consisted of a blue zircon ring, brooch and earrings.

She was attended by two bridesmaids, Miss Susan Clarke (her friend) and Miss Josephine Pitt (only sister of the bridegroom). They wore white velvet dresses, with head wreaths and bouquets of fresh white flowers. Their naval brooches were gifts from the bridegroom.

The best man was Mr Simon Pitt, Welsh Guards (brother of the bridegroom), and among the eight groomsmen were Mr Paul Lovel Mack (brother of the bride), and Mr Robin Pitt (brother of the bridegroom). There was a guard of honour of naval officers outside the church.

The reception was held at Claridge’s, and was attended by 250 guests. Many friends of the bride and her family travelled from Cheshire, and among the Bath party were directors of Stothert and Pitt Ltd, of which Col. Pitt is managing director.

The bride travelled afterwards in a blue frock and fawn tweed coat.

Lieut. and Mrs Pitt are making their home at Petersfield, Hants, where the former is doing a year’s signalling course.

The bride and bridegroom received many beautiful presents. There were gifts, among others, from Mr Lovel Mack’s shipping firm, from the directors of Stothert and Pitt, and from the farm and domestic staffs at Middle Twinhoe.

Wedding Wednesday – Edward Musgrove and Rebecca Cockshutt

Edward Musgrove is my 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Joseph Musgrove and Bridget Maria Grainger. Our common ancestors are John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth, my 2x great grandparents.

Edward was born on 8 March 1903 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

On the 2 November 1940 Edward married Rebecca Cockshutt at St. Mary’s Parish Church, Clitheroe. A report of the wedding was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 8 November 1940.

Edward Musgrove & Rebecca Cockshutt wedding.png

MUSGROVE-COCKSHUTT

The wedding took place on Saturday, at St. Mary’s Parish Church, of Mr. Edward Musgrove, the fifth son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Musgrove, of 66, Wilkin Street, and Miss Rebecca I. Cockshutt, daughter of Mrs. and the late Mr. G. Cockshutt, of 6, Chatburn Road, Clitheroe. The Rev. W. S. Helm, M.A., performed the ceremony.

Given away by her brother, Mr. George Cockshutt, the bride was attired in a pale blue edge-to-edge coat, a floral gown with navy accessories, and had a spray of pink carnations. The bridesmaid, Miss Hilda Gates (niece), wore a similar ensemble in a darker shade. The best man was Mr. Tom Musgrove, and the groomsman Mr. John Smalley.

A reception followed at Briggs’s cafe, the bride and bridegroom afterwards leaving for Blackpool. They are to reside at 6, Chatburn Road, Clitheroe.

Wedding Wednesday – Frederick Joseph Smithson and Nancy Proudfoot

Nancy Proudfoot is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Arthur Proudfoot and Ellen Ann Myers. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane, my 3x great grandparents.

Nancy was born on 8 Aug 1919 in Auckland, Durham.

On 19 October 1940 Nancy married Frederick Joseph Smithson at the Burnley Registry Office. Details of their wedding were published in the Nelson Leader on 25 October 1940.

Frederick Smithson & Nancy Proudfoot wedding.png

The marriage was solemnised at Burnley Registry Office, on Saturday, between Platoon Sergeant Major Frederick J Smithson, eldest son of Mrs and the late Mr F Smithson, of 23 Mosley Street, Nelson, and Miss Nancy Proudfoot, youngest daughter of Mr and Mrs A Proudfoot, of 146 Hibson Road, Nelson. The bridegroom is a member of the Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire) having served for a period of sixteen and a half years; the bride is employed as a cotton winder at Messrs Pemberton’s Clover Hill Mills.

Attired in an Air Force blue coat with navy blue accessories, the bride was attended by her sister, Miss Mary Proudfoot, who wore a Mulberry three piece suit. The duties of best man were discharged by Sergeant R Roebuck, of the Border Regiment, a colleague of the bridegroom. The future residence is 23 Mosley Street, Nelson.

Wedding Wednesday – Joseph Musgrove and Bridget Maria Grainger

Joseph Musgrove is my great grand uncle (the brother of my great grandfather Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove).

Joseph was born on 13 April 1864 to parents John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth (my 2x great grandparents).

On 16 May 1891 Joseph married Bridget Maria Grainger in Clitheroe, Lancashire. Bridget had been born on 23 February 1867 in Devon.

On the 9 May 1941 the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times published an article celebrating the golden wedding anniversary of Joseph and Bridget.

Joseph and Bridget Musgrove Golden Wedding.png

FAMILY OF ELEVEN

REARED ON £1 A WEEK

GOLDEN WEDDING MEMORIES OF MR. & MRS. J. MUSGROVE

An insight into conditions of life which obtained fifty or more years ago was given in an interview by Mr and Mrs Joseph Musgrove, of 66 Wilkin Street, Clitheroe, who will celebrate their golden wedding on Monday next. They were married on May 12, 1891, at St James’s Church, by the curate, the Rev Mr Ince.

STARTED WORK WHEN SIX!

Seventy-seven years of age and a native of Darwen, Mr Musgrove came to Clitheroe at the age of six and a half years, and started work in the spinning room at Messrs Dewhurst’s Salford Bridge Mills on attaining his eighth year. He was employed full time at eleven. When sixteen, he went to the print works at Barrow, but left there in 1896 to enter the employ of Clitheroe Corporation highways department, continuing for thirty years, except for a break of six years during which he worked as a mason’s labourer.

All his life, Mr Musgrove has taken a keen interest in both football and cricket, rarely missing a match either at Shaw Bridge or at Chatburn Road. For fifty-six years he has been identified with Court “Royal Castle” (No. 8549) of the Ancient Order of Foresters, and still holds the post of senior door beadle. For eleven years he was one of the borough’s halberdiers. “We had to buy our own top hats and white gloves in those days,” he said, adding: “There were none o’these fancy cloaks and three-cornered hats!”

SIXPENCE A WEEK!

Mrs Musgrove, whose maiden name was Miss Bridget Maria Grainger – she is a sister of the late Mr Luke Grainger, formerly of West View – was born seventy-four years ago near Taunton, Somerset, and came to Clitheroe at the age of sixteen. She learnt to weave at Salford Bridge Mill, where Mr Musgrove learnt spinning, but she had not had charge of two looms long when the mill closed down, and she was accordingly out of work for some time.

“Of course, I had been working for years before I came to Clitheroe,” she said. “Maybe you won’t believe me when I tell you that when eight years old, my wage was sixpence a week.”

Mrs Musgrove added the information that this remuneration was for looking after the smaller children of a well-to-do family, who also provided her with meals. “They regarded the sixpence as spending money, but my mother had to clothe me out of it,” she added.

Speaking of old times, Mrs Musgrove said: “Yes, they were hard, I can’t say I would like to live them over again – not under the same conditions, at any rate.” She went on to say that it was a big problem to bring up a family of eleven on £1 a week. “I can’t tell you how we managed, but we did. It was a hard struggle, but we were fortunate in having good health.”

SUPREME SACRIFICE

Of a family of eleven children, seven – three daughters and four sons survive. Of four sons who served in the last Great War, two made the supreme sacrifice.

All their married life Mr and Mrs Musgrove have been associated with St Mary’s Parish Church. Mrs Musgrove being one of the oldest and a founder member of the Mothers’ Union. Their golden wedding anniversary will be celebrated quietly at home, with just a few relatives and neighbours for tea. “Lord Woolton won’t let us do much more.” Mrs Musgrove said with a laugh.

In conjunction with their many friends, we wish them health and many more years of happiness together.

Wedding Wednesday – Marjorie Musgrove and John Edward Lord

Marjorie Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. Her parents are James Musgrove and Edith Jane Hibble. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

Marjorie was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire in 1921.

On 19 August 1939 Marjorie married John Edward Lord at Clitheroe Congregational Church. A report of the wedding was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 25 August 1939.

Marjorie Musgrove & John E Lord wedding.png

LORD — MUSGROVE

On Saturday last, at Clitheroe Congregational Church, the Rev. J. A. Sinclair performed the nuptials of Mr. John Edward Lord, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Lord, of 29 Pendle Road, and Miss Marjorie Musgrove, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. Musgrove, 15 Woone Lane.

The bride, given away by her father, was gowned in blue satin, with tight fitting sleeves and heart shaped neck-line. The veil was surmounted by a halo of flowers, the bouquet being composed of pink carnations, orange blossom and white heather.

The bridesmaids were Miss B. Musgrove (sister) and Miss A. Lord, of Blackburn, the bridegroom’s cousin. They were gowned in pale pink lace over slips of a similar shade, trimmed with pale blue ribbon, the pink veils being surmounted by floral halos. Pink and mauve sweet peas formed the bouquets.

The best man was Mr. R. Lord, and the groomsman Mr. T. Hibble. The church had been specially decorated with pink carnations by Mrs. Ratcliffe, and Mr. A. Taylor was at the organ. As they left the church, bride and bridegroom were presented with a silver horse-shoe by Mrs. Preston.

The bridegroom’s gift to the bride was a gold wristlet watch, and dress rings to the bridesmaids. The bride presented the bridegroom with gold cuff-links. A reception was held at the Starkie Arms Hotel. Mr. and Mrs. Lord are residing at 27 Chatburn Road.

Wedding Wednesday – Edith Stephenson and Ernest Northcote Morfitt

Edith Stephenson is my wife’s 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are Charles Stephenson and Emma Ramsey. Their common ancestors are Jospeh Lockington and Jane Slight, my wife’s 3x great grandparents.

Edith married Ernest Northcote Morfitt on 27 Jun 1907 and a report of the ceremony was published in the Hull Daily Mail.

Hull Daily Mail - 27 June 1907.pngPRETTY WEDDING AT STONEFERRY

A very pretty wedding, in which Stoneferry seemed greatly interested, took place this afternoon at St Saviour’s Church, Wilmington. The bridal parties were Miss Edith Stephenson, only daughter of Mr and Mrs C Stephenson, 144, Cleveland Street, and Mr Ernest Northcote Morfitt, of King’s Mill, eldest son of Mr and Mrs J Morfitt.

A bright, fully choral service had been arranged, as the bride has been closely associated with music, and as a compliment Mr Alvan B Young, LLCM, presided at the organ.

The bride was attired in a white silk eolienne dress, which was trimmed with orange blossom and very delicate lace. She also wore a bridal veil of orange blossom, and carried a shower bouquet composed of sweet peas and carnations.

There were four bridesmaids – Miss May E Morfitt, Miss Beatrice Lee – dressed in cream eolienne with crinoline hats, and they carried shower bouquets. Miss Fanny Morfitt and Miss Smailes were dressed in white silk with Napoleon hats. They carried baskets of flowers. The bride was given away by her father, and the bridegroom was accompanied by Mr W E Smailes as best man.

The Rev E V Dunn, the vicar, who conducted the service, was assisted by the Rev H J Boon.

Both the bride and the bridegroom are greatly respected in Stoneferry, and the church was full of well wishers. At several of the houses bunting was out, and flags were flying. The bride is a music teacher, and has many pupils.

The chancel of the church and the altar were adorned with flowers. A reception, at which there were about 300 guests, was afterwards held at the Oddfellows’ Hall. Both the bride and the bridegroom were the recipients of many presents.

Edith and Ernest had one child – George Ernest, born on 12 March 1908.

Sadly the couple only had eleven years of married life before Edith passed away on 15 December 1918.

Ernest remarried about eight years later to Elsie M Tasker – the marriage is registered in the December quarter of 1926.