Workday Wednesday

Workday Wednesday – George Robert Newman (1881-1977)

Eva Gawthrop is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are John Thomas Gawthrop and Annie Elizabeth Salisbury. Our common ancestors are John Gawthrop and Sarah Brown – my 4x great grandparents.

Eva was born on 9 May 1899 in Barrow in Furness, Lancashire.

In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2, Eva was living with her sister May Kirkby and family at Holker Street, Barrow in Furness. Eva was working as an “engine tracer (shipping)”. I had to look up the occupation to find out a bit more. The job involved tracing plans for the navy ships which were drawn up by the draughtsmen then photographed onto blueprints for building them. You had to be very accurate as you weren’t allowed to rub out any mistakes. You had a long period of training and supervision (a three year apprenticeship) and a great deal of practice before being allowed to work unsupervised.

Sometime in the March quarter of 1950 Eva married George Robert Newman in Barrow in Furness.

George Robert was a widower. He was born in 1881 and had married Nellie Key in 1908. They had one son, Leslie born in 1914. Nellie died at the age of 66 on18 January 1949.

So Eva and George Robert were a mature couple when they married. In fact George Robert had a long career as a Police officer in Hull, Yorkshire. At the time of his marriage to Eva her had been retired for almost 17 years. I found the following article in the Hull Daily Mail of Thursday 31 August 1933 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Hull Daily Mail - 31 Aug 1933.png

LEAVING HULL POLICE

Officer Who Served in Every Division

Today Hull bids an official farewell to one of its police chiefs, Superintendent George Robert Newman, who has been in the Force for nearly 29 years, and now retires on pension.
Mr Newman can lay claim to having served in each of the police divisions of the city at least once, and in some twice. Further, he has served under four Chief Constables: Major P. Malcolm, Mr George Morley, the late Captain Woods, and the present Chief Constable, Mr T. E. Howden.
Superintendent Newman joined the force in November, 1904, and after being at Wincolmlee station for about two years he was transferred to the Fire Brigade station. Here he remained for 14 years. In 1921 he was promoted to sergeant and transferred to the Central Division as a section sergeant.
In 1923 he again received promotion, this time to station sergeant, and took up duty at Norfolk Street station until 1925, when he was made an inspector and transferred to Wincolmlee. After a year he was again moved to the Central Station, remaining for two years.

IN CHARGE OF DIVISION
In 1928 he was raised to the rank of Chief Inspector, and was placed in charge of Crowle Street until 1929. He was then moved to Gordon Street, and placed in charge of the division. In the same year Mr Newman was appointed as Superintendent, and remained in charge of West Hull until his retirement.
Actually Superintendent Newman has served for 28 years and 9 months. During the past three years he has undertaken prosecutions for the police twice per week.
He is president of the International Police Association and the Police Temperance Society, while he is also interested in the Temporary Home for young people in Hull.
Mr Newman, who has earned the respect of everyone except lawbreakers, will remain in Hull after his retirement.

George Robert passed away at the age of 96 on 15 November 1977. Eva died 15 months later on 21 February 1979 at the age of 79.

Advertisements

Workday Wednesday – Walter Duncan Burt (1904-1967)

Walter Duncan Burt is my wife’s 4th cousin 1x removed – so not especially close. Their common ancestor is John Aspley (my wife’s 4x great grandfather).

Walter was born on 28 July 1904 in Hanford, Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire. His parents are Robert Duncan Burt and Mary Elizabeth Hollins.

Sometime in the second quarter of 1930 Walter married Evelyn Higgs.

In the 1939 Register Walter and Evelyn are living at 107 Wilson Road, Stoke on Trent. Walter is working on the railway as locomotive fireman. Living two doors away at 111 Wilson Road is Walter’s sister Lucy Ellen and her husband Thomas Wilson Critchlow.

Sadly Walter was killed on 28 February 1967 when the train he was driving was involved in the Stechford rail crash at Stechford railway station in the area of Stechford, Birmingham.

A total of nine people were killed in the crash – an inquest was opened and adjourned on Thursday 2 March 1967. The Birmingham Daily Post of Friday 3 March 1967 ran the following story (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Walter Duncan Burt - Birmingham Daily Post 3 March 1967.png

Many inquiries into rail deaths – Coroner

The inquests on the nine people killed in the Stechford train crash on Tuesday, were adjourned yesterday for further inquiries to be made.
Opening the inquests the Birmingham City Coroner, Mr George Billington, said: “The inquests upon these nine victims of this terrible tragedy will have to be adjourned to a date to be fixed because there are many inquiries which have got to be made.”
After hearing formal evidence of identification, the coroner gave permission for the funerals to take place as soon as the relatives wished.
One of the witnesses, a Coventry man who saw his wife killed in the crash, broke down and wept while giving evidence and had to be helped from the courtroom.
He was Mr John Graham Costigan, of Yewdale Crescent, Potters Green, who said he was travelling with his 22-year-old wife, Sylvia, on the electric train from New Street, Birmingham to Coventry when the train was involved in a collision.
His wife was dead on arrival at East Birmingham Hospital.
The nine victims of the crash were: The driver of the electric train, Mr Walter Duncan Burt, aged 62, of Wilson Road, Stoke on Trent; Sylvia Ann Costigan, aged 22, of Yewdale Crescent, Coventry; Mr Carl Adrian Perry, aged 17, a student, of Prince of Wales Road, Coventry; Mr Gerald Richard Oliver Gilbert, aged 56, stockbroker of Belvedere Road, Coventry; Mr Rajindir Singh, aged 15, student, of Bryn Road, Coventry; Mr Mohinder Singh, aged 17, shop assistant, of Foleshill Road, Coventry; Mrs Joan Lilian Smith, aged 23, of Ash Road, Stockingford, Nuneaton; Mr Michael Hubert Asquith Batten, aged 22, architectural student, of South Avenue, Stoke Park, Coventry; and Mrs Ethel Elisabeth Gleave, aged 49, housewife, of Allesley Old Road, Coventry.
The condition of Mr Alfred Hollins, of Bath Street, Rugby, one of three people still detained at East Birmingham Hospital after the crash, was said yesterday to have improved.
The conditions of the other two, Miss Lilian Le Rose, of Chapel Lane, Hadfield, Glossop, Derbyshire, and Mrs Hilda Mayhew, of Pearson Avenue, Bell Green, Coventry, remained satisfactory.
The Minister of Transport has appointed Col. D McMullen, chief inspecting officer of railways, to hold an inquiry into the crash.
It will be held at the Midland Hotel, Birmingham, next Thursday.

It then took a further 15 months before the outcome of the inquiry was made public.

The following article is from the Aberdeen Evening Express of 23 May 1968 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Walter Duncan Burt - Aberdeen Evening Express - 23 May 1968.png

Four blamed for rail death crash

FOUR RAILWAYMEN were today blamed for a rail crash near Birmingham last year in which nine people died.
The crash – at Stechford (Warwicks.) – occurred when an express electric train and a diesel shunting engine collided on February 28, 1967

In his report to the Minister of Transport, Colonel D McMullen, Chief Inspecting officer of railways, says the diesel was making an unauthorised move across main lines from a branch line.
The move was being made without authority from the New Street power box, and was said to be tacitly agreed to by local signalman   C H Curtis (64).
Curtis, says the report, must accept a share of the responsibility for the result.
Head shunter R H J Tolster – who knew the diesel’s move was unauthorised – was “seriously to blame.”
He was negligent in not coming to a clear understanding with the diesel’s driver, Mr H D Garrett (49), as to what movements were to be made.

Delay

An alternative route for the diesel was said to have been suggested by Tolster to Curtis, but Tolster did not press the point – probably because he realised it would cause delay and he thought the diesel’s crew were anxious to get home, the report says.
The report says that Curtis was not in a position to give Tolster an order not to carry out the movement, but he did not exercise the authority of his age and nearly 4o years experience to dissuade Tolster.
Driver Garrett and his second man, B K Sugden (27), were both at fault in failing to come to a clear understanding with the traffic staff about an unsignalled movement such as the one they made.
Both were also at fault in failing to comply with instructions regarding the position of the second man in the locomotive.
The report clears the New Street power box signalman, Mr R W Bradbury (60), and the driver of the express, Mr Walter Duncan Burt (62), who was killed, from any blame.
There was no failure of the modern signalling equipment the report adds.

I hope the family of Walter were able to get some comfort from the report and the fact that no blame was attached to him for the accident. Nevertheless it must have been a very bad period for everyone involved.

Here is a full version of the inquiry report by Cololnel McMullen.

MoT_Stechford1967

Workday Wednesday – Warren John Bruce (1880-1964)

Warren John Bruce is the husband of my wife’s 2nd cousin 2x removed, Sarah Jane Espley. My wife and Sarah Jane share common ancestors in James Espley and Martha Silvester (my wife’s 3x great grandparents).

Warren was born on 5 February 1880 in Stockport, Cheshire. He started working for the Manchester Ship Canal company at the age of 14 in 1894. In the 1911 census his occupation is “chief clerk Manchester docks”.

In November 1938 Warren was promoted to Docks Manager from his position as Deputy Dock Manager. He remained in post until 1945 when he retired after 51 years service. His retirement was mentioned in the Manchester Evening News of 18 December 1945 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Warren John Bruce - Manchester Evening News 18 December 1945.png

Manchester Evening News – British Newspaper Archives

Canal Docks Manager is Retiring

After 51 years’ service with the Manchester Ship Canal Mr. Warren J Bruce is retiring as docks manager. His service with the company began in 1894 – when the Canal was opened for through traffic to Manchester. He had been docks manager since November, 1938.

His successor, Mr H Oakley Smith, who was educated at Argyle House School, Sunderland, and HMS Worcester, served with the P and O Company until 1924, when he joined Lever Brothers Traffic Dept., and went to West Africa, ultimately becoming assistant to the Nigerian Traffic Manager.

Mr. Oakley Smith, who is a member of the Institute of Transport, Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, and an Associate of the Institute of Naval Architecture, was appointed assistant docks manager with the Manchester Ship Canal in 1940.

I also know from a report in the Lancashire Evening News of 26 October 1938 that Warren’s predecessor as Docks Manager, Mr F W Way, had been with the Manchester Ship Canal company for almost 50 years.

Clearly a company at that time which inspired people to stay with them for a long time.

Workday Wednesday – James Musgrove (1901-1983)

James Musgrove is my grand uncle – brother of my grandmother Florrie Musgrove.

James was born on 9 April 1901 in Clitheroe, Lancashire – the fifth of ten children to my great grandparents Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner.

At the age of 18 James married Edith Jane Hibble on 27 October 1919.

In the 1939 Register James is presumably away doing his bit for the war. Edith is at home living at 51 Woone Lane, Clitheroe.

James came home safely from WW2 and at some point afterwards started working for the Post Office. I know from the following newspaper article that he drove a Post Office van – and in this instance he had a lucky escape.

James Musgrove - CAT 11 March 1955.png

Mail Van Overturns

On the way from Blackburn with Clitheroe’s morning mail, early on Friday, a Post Office motor van skidded on a slippery toad surface at Barrow, turned a half circle, struck the pavement and overturned on its side.

The driver, James Musgrove, aged 53, of 51 Woone Lane, Clitheroe, escaped with bruises about the arms and back.

The mail was transferred to another vehicle and there was no delay in the morning delivery in Clitheroe.

Workday Wednesday – Smith Buckley (1848-1913)

Smith Buckley is my 1st cousin 3x removed. Our common ancestors are Thomas Buckley and Henrietta Mason, my 3x great grandparents. That makes Smith a nephew of my 2x great grandparents James Buckley and Sarah Tattersall.

Smith was born sometime in the first quarter of 1848 in Bingley, West Yorkshire. He was the second of seven children to William Buckley and Mary Heaps.

Sometime in the second quarter of 1867 Smith married Margaret Day in Bradford, West Yorkshire. Over the next 21 years they had seven children.

In the 1871 census Smith is working as a “mechanic”. I know from the following newspaper article that at some point in the next eight years he started working for Geo. Hattersley & Sons as “foreman mechanic”.

On Monday 30 December 1878 Smith was involved in a very nasty accident at work. The Keighley News reported on the event on 4 January 1879.

Smith Buckley - Keighley News 4 January 1879.png

Taken from the British Newspaper Archive website

HAWORTH

A VERY NARROW ESCAPE – A man named Smith Buckley (30), living at Spring Row, Haworth, who works as foreman mechanic for Messrs Geo Hattersley and sons, at Mytholmes Mill, had a marvellously narrow escape from being fatally injured while at work on Monday morning. The mill is partially worked by water-power, and during the recent frost a large water-wheel, which is in constant use, had been stationary. The thaw caused it to move again, the buckets being full of snow, and a segment in one of the chain of wheels was broken. While Buckley and another workman were attending to it, props were used to retain it in position, and as one piece of wood was being substituted for another, the support gave way, and Buckley was caught between the wall and one of the spokes of the revolving wheel. He managed to shift himself into a less perilous position before the next spoke came round, but he was taken round with the wheel four or five times before it came to a stand, only narrowly avoiding a fatal termination to the accident. The inhabitants of Spring Row, which is opposite, saw the whole occurrence. The unfortunate man, whose left leg was shattered below the knee in a shocking manner, was conveyed to the Keighley Cottage Hospital, where Dr. Jack, who attended to him, found amputation at the knee joint necessary. He had also sustained severe bruises all over the body, but there were no other fractures. The case is progressing favourably towards recovery. The injured man has a wife and four children depending on him.

I think it’s fair to say that life was going to be very much more difficult for Smith and his family after the accident and the loss of his leg. So this must have been a very worrying time for them.

I know from another newspaper report that Smith was a member of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers (ASE). The history of the union can be traced back to the formation of the Journeymen Steam Engine, Machine Makers’ and Millwrights’ Friendly Society, in 1826, popularly known as the “Old Mechanics”.

In 1920 the ASE was one of several unions that came together to form the Amalgamated Engineering Union (AEU).

Anyway, back to Smith, and life after his accident.

On the 4 May 1880 the Bradford Observer reported on a meeting the previous evening of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers.

Smith Buckley - Bradford Observer 4 May 1880.png

Taken from the British Newspaper Archive website

THE AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

Yesterday evening, a large meeting was held in the hall of the Mechanics’ Institute, Keighley. The meeting was convened by the members of the Keighley Branch of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers, for the purpose of presenting Mr Smith Buckley, of Haworth, one of their members, who met with an accident which caused the loss of his leg, with the sum of £100. Mr J Summerscales, of Keighley, occupied the chair, and impressed upon his audience the necessity for rendering better support to the Cottage Hospital in the town. Mr John Burnett, general secretary to the London society, spoke of the benefit which trades unions had had in raising the position of the working classes and in improving the trade of the country. Mr D Guile, of London, also addressed the meeting. Mr Henry Mitchell, president of the Bradford Chamber of Commerce, made the presentation, and spoke of the relation of England with foreign countries. The usual complimentary votes brought the meeting to a close.

Over the next thirty years Smith had various occupations listed in the census returns:-

1881 – Beerhouse keeper at the Princess Hotel, Duncan Street, Bradford. He made the newspapers again during his time as landlord for allowing drunkeness on his premises.

1891 – Furniture broker

1901 – Machine fitter

1911 – Textile fitter

I have enormous pride and respect for Smith. It seems as though he was courageous, determined and very hard working.

Smith died at the age of 65 and was buried in Utley Cemetery, Keighley on 9 July 1913.

Workday Wednesday – Barbara Dale Snape (1919-2001)

 

Barbara Dale Snape is my wife’s 3 cousin 1x removed. I posted recently about her sporting achievements while at university – see here.

Apart from her sporting achievements Barbara also had a successful career in education following graduation from university.

The following article appeared in the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer on 25 May 1955.

Screenshot 2017-10-02 18.35.11.png

Recommended as head mistress

A former head girl of Allerton High School, Leeds, and a graduate of London University, Miss Barbara D Snape, daughter of Mr and Mrs Frank Snape, of Alwoodley, Leeds, has been recommended for the post of head mistress of Pontefract Girls’ High School.

Miss Snape is at present in charge of senior history at Queen Ethelburga’s School, Harrogate, where she is a house mistress.

She was formerly a stroke in the London University women’s boat crew and has also rowed for Cambridge University women against Oxford University women.

Pontefract and District Girls’ High School was established in 1912 and closed in 1987. Some notable former students are:-

Jane Brooke – crime writer
Barbara Castle (Baroness Castle of Blackburn) – politician
Jane Collins – MEP, UKIP politician

Workday Wednesday – Zimri Skelding (1854-1906)

Workday Wednesday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

Here’s a way to document your ancestors’ occupations (they weren’t all farmers), transcripts of SS-5s, photos and stories of ancestors at work, announcements of retirements, etc.

Zimri Skelding is my wife’s 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Jesse Skelding and Sarah Taylor. Their common ancestors are William Skelding and Catherine Taylor, my wife’s 2x great grandparents.

Zimri was born sometime around 1854 – his birth is registered in the March quarter of that year in Stourbridge, Worcestershire.

I have Zimri on the 1861, 1881 and 1901 census returns. At the moment I can’t find him in either the 1871 or 1891 census.

In 1881 his occupation is given as “nail maker”. However I know from the newspaper article below that he was subsequently employed as a bricklayer.

Although I haven’t been able to find a marriage for Zimri I know that he was certainly living as husband and wife with Jemima Marsh. The census returns show that they had at least three children:-

George Richard – born 1880
Julietta Elizabeth – born 1885
Thomas Herbert – born 1885

I believe that they also had two other children who died young:-

Herbert (1875-1883)
Arthur (1882-1884)

In the 1881 census Zimri is shown as a “boarder” with his son George Richard at the home of Charlotte Marsh – Jemima’s mother. So far I have not been able to locate Jemima in this census.

In 1901 the family are living at Love Lane, Lye, Stourbridge, Worcestershire. There is no occupation shown for Zimri and he is described as being “lame”. Which really brings me to the reason for this blog post.

I recently found the following article in the Birmingham Daily Post of 17 December 1885.

Birmingham Daily Post - 17 December 1885DAMAGES UNDER THE EMPLOYERS’ LIABILITY ACT

At the Stourbridge County Court, yesterday – before Mr J Amphlett (deputy judge) and a jury – a case under the above Act was called on, in which Zimri Skelding, a bricklayer’s labourer, was plaintiff; and Messrs Dorse and Sons, contractors, of Cradley Heath, the defendants. Mr Waldron appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr Colbeck for the defendants. The plaintiff had lost a leg by the accident which formed the subject of the action, and he came into the box on crutches. He said he had been in defendants’ employ over eight years, and on July 23 was working for them at a chapel they were erecting at Smethwick. Witness and two other men, named Edwards and Brown, were pulling up a pole from the ground when the cross pole on which they were standing broke through. Witness fell a distance of fifty feet to the ground, and his leg was smashed. He was taken to the General Hospital, Birmingham, and his leg was taken off in consequence of the accident. His head was also injured by the fall. He used to earn a pound a week, and should be unable to follow his occupation again. Plaintiff said the poles in the scaffolding had been in use three or four years. The pole that broke must have been tender. Cross examined: His wages used to be 4 1/4d per hour. In the three months before the accident he would be making about forty two hours per week. He understood scaffolding a little, and had erected many a scaffolding. This particular scaffold was erected about three of four days before the accident, Brown, Edwards, and himself put it up. Edwards chose the poles for the scaffold. No person could have found this pole that broke was a bad pole by looking at it. He did not know the pole came from Messrs Adam, of Gloucester, two years ago. Mr Dorse was not there on the day of the accident. Mr Waldron asked if Edwards was the foreman, and witness said he was. Mr Colbeck objected that Mr Waldron was putting words into witness’s mouth. Witness, replying to another question, said he was bound to conform to Edwards’s orders. – Joe Edwards said he worked for defendants at the time of the accident, and he was bricklayer managing the job. Plaintiff was under his command when the master was not there. It was witness’s duty to test the scaffolding pole before it was used. He did so by picking it up at one end and shaking it, plaintiff holding the other end. That was the way they generally tried the poles. It was an old pole, with a crack or two in it. It was not sufficient for the job, but they had not another. He told young Mr Dorse they had not enough scaffolding, and he said he wanted the scaffolding away for another job, and they were to take what they wanted from round the building. He was not in the employ of Messrs Dorse now. Witness was on the middle of the pole when it broke, and plaintiff and another man at the end. The pole snapped, because it was not good enough. It was rotten. Cross examined: He was foreman at this job. His wages were 6 1/4d an hour. Bricklayers earned 6 1/4d and 7d up to 8d, but was only just out of his time. Asked if he should not consider it small pay for a foreman to get less than other bricklayers, witness said people must first creep and then walk. Plaintiff was bound to conform to witness’s orders. A man might please himself whether he obeyed him or not. Skelding did what he told him, and did so on this particular day. He could have got poles from another scaffolding, but did not want to disturb it. – Joseph Brown, another man engaged at the work, was also examined. – Mr Colbeck contended that negligence had neither been established against defendants or Edwards. All these men were working together, and they could not discover any defect in the poles they were using. Edwards told Mr Dorse they had not enough scaffolding, and was told to take some from round the building. Edwards was a foreman, and did not come within the meaning of the Act as a person having superintendence at the work. – His Honour thought there was a case to go to the jury, and Mr Colbeck then addressed himself to the evidence, putting it to the Court that the plaintiff had not made out his case. – Mr Dorse, jun. was called, and said that Edwards was not a foreman, but only an ordinary bricklayer, and he received the wages of a medium class man. He received no complaint that this pole was defective or unsafe, and his attention was never drawn to it. Edwards complained of being short of planks, and he told him where to get some. – After His Honour had summed up, the jury returned a verdict for the plaintiff for £75. Costs were certified on the higher scale.

So there we have it – Zimri got £75 compensation for losing his leg and not being able to work again.

It’s difficult to imagine how the family managed after Zimri could no longer work. In the 1901 census both sons are working as general labourers so that brought in some wages at least.

Zimri died in 1906.

In the 1911 census Jemima and the three children, plus a granddaughter, Sarah (this is Julietta’s child) are living at 46 Crab Street, Wollescote, Worcestershire. Under occupation it says that the two sons are unable to work.

Jemima Skelding died at the age of 68 in 1918.