Black Sheep Sunday

Black Sheep Sunday – Amos Clarkson

Amos Clarkson is the husband of my 5th cousin, Phyllis Wilson.

Phyllis was born on 23 March 1911 at Keighley, West Yorkshire. Her parents are Herbert Morris Wilson and Gerty Smith. Our common ancestors are Patrick Tattersall and Mary Gordon – my 4x great grandparents.

Amos was born on 23 March 1908 in Silsden, West Yorkshire.

On 22 April 1933 Amos and Phyllis married at the Parish Church in Silsden. At the time of their marriage Amos was a Police Constable and living at Taylor Street, Batley, West Yorkshire.

Unfortunately Amos found himself in trouble and in prison in 1947. The story was covered in the Daily Mirror on Friday 28 February 1947 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Amos Clarkson - Daily Mirror 28 February 1947.png

11-inch footprint clue puts P.C. in gaol for 3 years

A Policeman with footprints eleven inches long and a stride of twenty-eight inches, is to serve three years’ penal servitude.
He is Police-Constable Amos Clarkson, 38, of the West Riding Constabulary, who lives at Halifax Road, Hightown, Liversedge, Yorks, and sentence was passed on him at Leeds yesterday.
Footprints with diamond hallmarks, found inside the shop from which £25 10s. was stolen, coincided with Clarkson’s, it was stated.
Thirteen days after a robbery in a baker’s shop, police hid in it and were there when Clarkson entered. He ran away when taken in custody.

“I Lost My Head”
Clarkson told the Judge he was not near the shop on the night of the theft. “I lost my head.” he said, when asked why he ran away.
Passing sentence, the Judge said he was painfully conscious of the disaster the verdict meant to Clarkson and his wife and family, but it was impossible for him to take a lenient view.
Clarkson’s wife was carried screaming from the court.

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Black Sheep Sunday – Herbert John Croft (1898-1961)

Herbert John Croft is the husband of my 2nd cousin 2x removed, Agnes Ann Ainsworth.

Agnes was born on 23 September 1898 in Kendal, Westmorland. Her parents are Ralph Ainsworth and Margaret Ann Louisa Birkett. Our common ancestors are John Carradice and Ann Ridley – my 3x great grandparents.

Herbert was born on 7 June 1898, also in Kendal.

When WW1 broke out Herbert enlisted for service with the King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment on 28 July 1915. His regimental service number was 19829. His attestation papers show his age as 19 – in fact Herbert would not even be 17 for another two months.

However in just over 12 months Herbert was discharged as being “physically unfit” for service. He attended a medical board on 1 August 1916 and it is reported that around three years earlier he had been in hospital in connection with a heart problem and that since then he had “never had good health or felt perfectly well”. As a result he was finally discharged from military service on 15 August 1916.

About five years later Herbert married Agnes Ann Ainsworth – the marriage is registered in the second quarter of 1921 in Kendal.

Over the next 12 years Herbert seems to have had some “issues”. He appears in the Lancashire Evening Post at least three times (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

27 August 1921

Herbert John Croft - Lancashire Evening Post 27 August 1921.png

At Kendal, yesterday, Herbert John Croft, junr., was sentenced to one month’s imprisonment with hard labour for drawing out-of-work benefit whilst he was at work. He secured temporary employment to drive a motor ice-cream van, and whilst following that occupation went to the Kendal Labour Exchange and signed the register to the effect that he was out of work.

11 February 1933

Herbert John Croft - Lancashire Evening Post 11 February 1933

At Kendal, yesterday, Herbert John Croft, jun., motor engineer, a native of Kendal, of no fixed address, was remanded in custody until Monday on a charge of stealing an axe valued at 3s. 9d., the property of Messrs M. J. Croft and Son, Wildman Street, Kendal, the previous day.
The Chief Constable (Mr. P. O’Neill) objecting to bail, said there would probably be a more serious charge preferred against Croft.

I haven’t been able to find any other report relating to this offence.

10 June 1933

Herbert John Croft - Lancashire Evening Post - 10 Jun 1933.png

The story of a drunken man who threw a stone across the principal street in Kendal, striking the wall of a public house and narrowly missing women with babies in their arms, was told at Kendal yesterday, when Herbert John Croft, jun., aged 35 years, a Kendal engineer with no fixed address, was summoned for being drunk and disorderly at Highgate, Kendal, on Wednesday, June 7th. Defendant pleaded “Guilty.”
P.C. Marshall said he saw defendant throw the stone, and found two more in his pockets. When spoken to defendant said, “I know what I am doing.”
Defendant, who said he threw the stone at a man who had struck him, was fined £1.

The thing bothering me about the last two newspaper stories is the fact that Herbert is said to be of no fixed address. I’m left wondering what happened to his wife Agnes and their daughter Mavis Doreen who had been born in 1921.

In the 1939 Register (taken at the outbreak of WW2) Herbert is at 95 Windermere Road, Kendal. He is described as “married” and working as a “motor engineer”. In the same Register Agnes is with her parents at 30 Union Street, Kendal, together with her daughter Mavis.

So were Herbert and Agnes now living apart? Had they been separated since Herbert was described as of “no fixed address” six years earlier? Questions to which I am not going to get any answers now!

In some ways I feel sorry for Herbert. Perhaps being “physically unfit” had a serious impact on him. Or maybe he just made some wrong choices.

Black Sheep Sunday – Throup Shuttleworth

Throup Shuttleworth is the husband of my 1st cousin 2x removed Florrie Dawson.

Florrie was born on 1 February 1884 in Kildwick, West Yorkshire. Her parents are John Dawson and Elizabeth Bradley. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ellen Gawthrop – my 2x great grandparents.

Florrie and Throup married sometime in the March quarter of 1908 in Keighley, West Yorkshire.

Regrettably Throup made at least three appearances in the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer. Once in 1924 and twice (for the same incident) in 1933 (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Throup Shuttleworth - Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer 9 April 1924.png

9 April 1924

For theft of a wallet and money from a house at Steeton, Throup Shuttleworth (39), labourer, was sentenced to a month’s hard labour.

Throup Shuttleworth - Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer 29 May 1933.png

29 May 1933

WOMAN KILLED

Side-car Smashed in Silsden Road Crash

Mrs. Marion Simpson (27), a weaver, of North Street, Silsden was killed in a collision on the Steeton-Silsden Road last night between a motor-cycle combination in which she was riding and a motor car.
The cycle combination was being driven towards Steeton by Leonard Owens (33), motor mechanic, of Langbar, Ilkley. Mrs. Simpson was in the sidecar, and her husband, Harold Simpson (33), a weaver, was on the pillion seat. On the Steeton side of the bridge over the River Aire, the combination came into collision with a small saloon car driven towards Silsden by Throup Shuttleworth, of High Street, Steeton, who was the only occupant.
The sidecar was smashed, and Mrs. Simpson received extensive injuries, dying almost immediately.

Thorup Shuttleworth - Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer 17 June 1933.png

17 June 1933

Following a collision with a motor-cycle combination near the River Aire Bridge at Steeton, in which a young Silsden woman was killed, Throup Shuttleworth, motor engineer, of High Street, Steeton, was fined £5 at Keighley yesterday for driving a motor-car without due care. He was also fined 10s. for not having a driving licence. Defendant said the collision was an unavoidable accident.

You might just want to reflect on the different sentences for the two offences.

Throup passed away in 1938 at the age of 53.

Black Sheep Sunday – Vera Dawson (nee Mills)

Raymond Dawson is my 1st cousin 1x removed. His parents are Harry Dawson and Leah Owen. Our common ancestors are James Dawson and Emma Buckley – my great grandparents.

Raymond was born on 15 November 1923 in Keighley, West Yorkshire.

Sometime in the September quarter of 1952 Raymond married Vera Mills in Nelson, Lancashire.

About six years later Raymond and Vera appeared in The Nelson Leader on Friday 19 September 1958 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Vera Dawson - Nelson Leader 19 September 1958.png

Man Struck by Car “Thrown in Air”

LEARNER DRIVER IS FINED AT NELSON

Because the pavement was overgrown and not fit to walk on at a point in Barkerhouse Road, Nelson, two couples were walking in the roadway at 10.40 p.m. on Saturday, June 28th. The two husbands were walking together and their wives were some distance behind.
Prosecuting at Nelson Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, Superintendent J.A. Lancaster alleged that the man on the outside, Ronald Howarth, a shop manager, of 137 Cleaver Street, Burnley, was struck from behind by a car, “thrown in the air,” and fell on the bonnet striking his head on the windscreen, which was shattered.
The learner driver of the car, Vera Dawson (35), of 2 Oak Villas, Edith Street, Nelson, was find £5 with £5 7s. 5d. costs and had her licence endorsed for driving without due care and attention. Pleading “not guilty,” Mrs. Dawson told the court that she thought she had passed the two men safely. Mr. Howarth suddenly seemed to turn into the car.
Mr. Howarth, who said he was walking close to the pavement on the outside of Mr. John K. Probert, of 246 Barkerhouse Road, Nelson, told how he was struck from behind. “The next thing I remember was picking myself up off the road,” he said. He was taken to Victoria Hospital at Burnley, where he received treatment for lacerations to the back of the head.
Mr. Probert, who also gave evidence, said it was impossible to walk on the pavement on the near side of the road, and that there was no pavement at all on the other side. He saw a bus approaching up the hill towards them, and then the first indication of anything behind them was “a bump – a crash.” Mr. Howarth was carried by the car from five to 10 yards and dropped into the gutter by the side of the road. The car carried on for quite a distance beyond the point where the accident occurred, probably 20 yards.
Both witnesses agreed with Mr. J. Parry (defending) that if they had been obeying the Highway Code they would not have been walking on that side of the road, but pointed out that there was no refuge at all on the opposite side.
Evidence was given by both wives. Mrs. Howarth said that the car had gone round them, but had not pulled out far enough to get round her husband. She could see there was going to be an accident and shouted, but her husband did not hear and he did not move at all.
Mrs. Probert said that Mr. Howarth seemed to be lifted up on the bonnet of the car. She did not hear the car’s horn sound, and saw no reason why the car should not have pulled out.
Inspector T. Lunn told the court that, facing in the direction of Nelson, the nearside footpath at that point was overgrown and that it was not possible to walk on it.
In a statement by the defendant, which was read in court, she said that because an oncoming bus was level with the men she could not swing out very far. As she passed, one of the men seemed to “step out” and she heard breaking glass.
She told the court that she thought she had passed the men safely, and had no recollection of bringing the car nearer the side of the road after passing the ladies. Asked why she had travelled so far after the accident, she said she thought she had touched the accelerator instead of the brake. She had been startled by shattering glass. Mrs. Dawson, who had been learning to drive for three weeks at that time, said she had only taken over control of the car a few yards before the accident, was only in second gear and travelling between five and 10 miles per hour.
A statement by her husband, Mr. Raymond Dawson, who was in the car with her, was also read. In it he said that as the car drew level with the men the outside one “appeared to turn out, pivoting towards us.” In court, he said he thought the car was safely past until the man appeared to half turn and hit the windscreen with his shoulder. He saw no reason to interfere with his wife’s driving until the accident had happened and she put her foot on the accelerator.
On behalf of his client, Mr. Parry submitted that the people walking in the road were not obeying all the rules laid down in the Highway Code and were apparently making no effort to see if there was any traffic coming behind them. He maintained that there was sufficient conflict of evidence to justify the case being dismissed.

 

Black Sheep Sunday – Cecil Hurtley Harrison

Cecil Hurtley Harrison is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. His parents are George Holroyd Harrison and Florence Shaw Hurtley. Our common ancestors are Thomas Hurtley and Hannah Braidley – my 3x great grandparents.

Cecil was born in Leeds, West Yorkshire on 17 August 1901. He was the second of five children.

In the 1911 census Cecil, his parents and his siblings are living at 58 Shaftsbury Avenue, Roundhay, Leeds.

Twelve years later Cecil found himself in trouble for dangerous driving. The following story is from the Yorkshire Evening Post of 5 April 1923 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Cecil Hurtley Harrison - YEP 5 April 1923.png

DROVE TO POLICE STATION

£10 FINE ON LEEDS MAN WHO CRASHED INTO MOTOR-CYCLIST

For driving a motor-car in a dangerous manner, Cecil Hurtley Harrison (21), of Shaftsbury Avenue, Roundhay, was fined £10 and costs in Leeds today, while his licence was also endorsed.
It was stated that on March 15 Police Constable Dodge was on duty in Roundhay Road when a big touring car flashed past, and, almost at the same moment, collided with a motor-cycle.
Both vehicles were travelling towards the city. As the car did not stop, the constable blew his whistle, but the driver continued his journey.
The motor-cycle was damaged, though, fortunately, the rider, Mr. William Arthur Dalby, of Wyke, was able to go home without seeking medical aid.
On arrival at the police station, the constable learned that the defendant had called and reported that he was driving at a speed of 25 to 30 miles an hour when he suddenly saw the motor-cyclist in front of him, and was unable to avoid him.

I guess that Cecil perhaps panicked and then realised the consequences of not stopping. I am glad that he at least had the good sense to go to the police station and report the accident.

Black Sheep Sunday – Hilda Maskell (nee Coulam)

Hilda Coulam is my wife’s 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are George Coulam and Sarah Ann Turner. Their common ancestors are James Padley and Sarah Bradshaw – my wife’s 3x great grandparents.

Hilda was born on 2 January 1911 at Tathwell, near Louth in Lincolnshire.

Sometime in the fourth quarter of 1932 Hilda married George Maskell – their marriage is registered in Louth.

Hilda appeared before Louth Borough Magistrates in July 1952 as reported in the Louth and North Lincolnshire Advertiser on 26 July (taken from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Hilda Maskell - Louth and North Lincolnshire Advertiser 26 July 1952.png

BOXED SCHOOL-BOY’S EARS

Louth Woman Bound Over By Court

While two children held him, a Louth woman hit a nine-year-old boy whom she thought had struck her own daughter with a cricket bat, it was alleged at Louth Borough Magistrates’ Court yesterday (Thursday). The woman, Mrs Hilda Maskell, of 31 Abbey Road, Louth, summoned for assaulting and battering the boy, was bound over to be of good behaviour for 12 months in the sum of £5.
The summons was preferred by Mrs Ellen Windle, mother of the boy, who was represented by Mr S Harmston. Capt. R H Helmer appeared for Mrs Maskell and entered a pleas of not guilty.
“This summons,” Mr Harmston told the Bench, “is brought to teach adults that they cannot take the law into their own hands and assault little children, whatever has happened.”

BOY’S STORY
Nine-year-old John Windle said that he left school on July 15th with Raymond Grebby, and added that he knew children named Ernie Taylor and Ingrid Spix.
“Mrs Maskell said something to them, and then Ingrid and Ernie came running after me and caught hold of me,” he alleged. “Mrs Maskell came and hit me on the face and then on the head. They held me while she hit me. She used a swear word to me.”
The boy added that he knew Maureen Maskell but said he had not hurt her at any time.
Mrs Maskell hit him four or five times on the face and then on the head. It hurt but he did not cry.
Answering Capt. Helmer, the boy said he had a cricket bat with him but denied hitting Maureen Maskell with it. He said he had never touched the girl and had not sworn at Mrs Maskell.

“GAVE HIM GOOD CLIP”
Sheila Addison (9), of 12 Abbey Road, Louth, said she saw the children holding John Windle. Mrs Maskell hit him four or five times while he was being held.
Raymond Grebby, 60 St Bernard’s Avenue, Louth, said he left school with John. He saw a boy hitting Maureen Maskell, but John did not hit her. He told Capt. Helmer that the boy who hit the girl also had a bat, as well as John. “John didn’t hit her because he was with me,” he said.
Mrs Dorothy Margaret Fieldsend, of 30 Abbey Road, Louth, appearing on subpoena, said she was looking out of her window when she saw children chasing John Windle. “The next thing I looked up and saw Mrs Maskell was giving him a good clip across the ear,” she added.
Mrs Ellen Windle, of 28 Broadley Crescent, the boy’s mother, said as she was going home Sheila Addison and Mrs Fieldsend spoke to her. When she got home she saw that John’s face was “all red, and so was his head.”
She told Capt. Helmer that she had had a complaint about John, who got blamed for a lot he did not do.The complaint had been made by Mr Maskell, witness told Mr Harmston.

“GIRL HIT WITH BAT”
First witness for the defence, Mrs Ethel May Willoughby, of 19 Abbey Road, Louth, said she was speaking to John Windle when three little girls came up. John chased them with a cricket bat – “a large one” – and hit Maureen with it. She ran off crying.
“I have no doubt he was the boy,” witness continued. “Mrs Maskell walked down the road, caught John and smacked his ears two or three times. “I should most probably have done the same thing had it been my little girl,” she added.
Mr Harmston: You don’t like John, do you? – I like all children.
Answer my question. You don’t like John? – There are a lot of children I’m not exactly fond of.
And John is one of them? – Yes.
Mrs Willoughby added that she had several times stopped other children hitting the boy.

“LAUGHED AT ME”
Mrs Hilda Maskell said that when Maureen arrived home she was crying. “I went up to John,” she said. “Two children were holding him. He had a cricket bat, and I boxed him on the ears and said “Perhaps that will teach you a lesson for the future.” He turned round and laughed at me.” The boy had previously used bad language, she alleged.
Mr Harmston: Did you see John hit Maureen? – No.
Did you ask John if he had hit Maureen? – No.
Did you think it right to hit this small boy while he was being held? – No, I don’t think so. I did it under very great stress.
Capt. Helmer, making his submission, commented: “Young people nowadays seem to imagine that they can behave as they like, and if anyone looks at them or touches them they can be summoned for assault.

CHAIRMAN’S ADVICE
“You have seen the little boy. All they want is a tinsel halo and a pair of wings to allow him to float away. We don’t hear of Master John crying after his ears are boxed, but we do know that the little girl was crying.”
But, added Capt. Helmer, there must be a technical offence. It might be a pity to take the law into one’s own hands, but if more people did so there would not be so much juvenile delinquency, he added.
After the Bench had retired the chairman, Ald. A E Maxey, pointed out to Mrs Windle that she had admitted that there had been a complaint against her son. “You must take the boy under hand and stop him.” he added.
The chairman told Mrs Maskell: “We find you guilty. You know you must not take the law into your own hands, however you feel about it. If everyone took notice of your advocate we should have the Court full every time.”
Mrs Maskell was then bound over and ordered to pay 4/- costs.

 

Black Sheep Sunday – Charles Cantwell & Edna May Cantwell (nee Buckley)

Edna May Buckley is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Ramsden Buckley and Emma Elliott. Our common ancestors are Thomas Buckley and Henrietta Mason – my 3x great grandparents.

Edna May was born in Keighley, West Yorkshire on 7 November 1904. She was the last of six children. In the 1911 census the family were living at 16 Hainworth Lane, Keighley.

Sometime in the second quarter of 1923 Edna May married Charles Cantwell. Charles was born on 8 August 1903 and was also from Keighley.

Before they were married Charles had been in trouble with the police more than once.

In 1918 he appeared in court along with four other young men. They were charged with stealing a cap and a pack of cards, valued at 3s 6d, from the Keighley Bowling Club on 13 December. All five pleaded guilty and Charles was fined ten shillings.

Less than three years into their marriage things were not going well. The following report is from the Leeds Mercury of 27 February 1926.

Charles Cantwell - Leeds Mercury 27 February 1926.png

KEIGHLEY: Red Hot Poker Attack

Alleged to have thrown hot tea over his wife, struck her with a red hot poker, blackened her eyes, and threatened her with a razor, Charles Cantwell, labourer, of Bogthorne, Oakworth, at Keighley yesterday was ordered to pay 20s a week on a separation order.

At the time of the 1939 Register in September that year Charles and Edna May are still together and living at 56 Woodhouse Grove, Keighley. Charles is working as a “scrap iron dealer”

Four and a half months later both Charles and Edna May appear in the Yorkshire Evening Post of 13 February 1940.

Charles Cantwell - YEP 13 February 1940.png

CHASE & FIGHT IN THE BLACKOUT

KEIGHLEY CONSTABLE COMMENDED

Gaol for Man who Stole from Cafe

Charles Cantwell (34), general dealer, Woodhouse Grove, Keighley, was sent to prison for a total of six months when he was charged at Keighley today with stealing knives and forks from Ramsden’s Cafe, and with assaulting Police constable Lodge in the execution of his duty.
His wife, Edna M Cantwell, who was also charged with the theft, was fined £1 in this case, and a further £1 on a charge of obstructing the police.
Richard A Robinson (28), hairdresser, Linnet Street, Keighley, was jointly charged with the theft, but the case against him was dismissed.
Defendants pleaded not guilty.
The Mayor asked that the work of Police constable Lodge in the case be brought to the notice of the proper authority.
Superintendent Atkinson said that about10.30pm on February 1 the defendants went to the cafe and had supper. When they left, a waitress missed three knives and forks, a sugar basin, and a bottle of tomato ketchup from the table. Police constable Lodge saw defendants leave the cafe. Hearing something rattling in Charles Cantwell’s pocket the officer asked him what he had there. Cantwell ran down High Street towards the cross.
Giving chase the officer caught Cantwell in Church Street, where, it was alleged, Cantwell took a bottle of ketchup from his raincoat pocket, struck the constable on the left arm with it, and then threw it away. There was a struggle and both fell. When they got up Cantwell took something else from his pocket and threw it away and the constable heard the sound of breaking crockery. Cantwell then struck and kicked the constable, causing him to lose his hold.
Again Cantwell bolted and again the constable caught him, this time in Low Street. There was another struggle and Mrs Cantwell pulled the constable’s cape over his head and tried to free her husband.
Eventually the constable managed to blow his whistle and it was not until then that Cantwell gave up struggling. The wife, it is alleged, was obstructing the constable all the way. Later a broken sugar basin, Cantwell’s hat, a fork, and a bottle of tomato ketchup were found in the street.
Police constable Lodge said Cantwell had some drink, but he was not drunk.
Answering Mr H Wall (Turner and Wall, Keighley), witness said it was possible that Cantwell might have got rid of the other forks during the chase.

Somebody’s “Joke”

Charles Cantwell told the bench that he was drunk at the time of the alleged offence. He put his raincoat over a chair in the cafe, but he put nothing into the pockets. He suggested that someone might have put the things in his pocket as a joke.
“As far as assaulting the officer goes, it was him that assaulted me,” added defendant.
Robinson said he had no knowledge of anything having been taken. He did not take anything.
Mrs Cantwell had nothing to say.

That is the last newspaper article I have been able to find about either Charles or Edna May. Perhaps six months in prison was the turning point and they had a trouble free existence after that.

Charles died on 22 January 1980 and left a will valued at £9641.

Edna May died on 1 May 1980 and she left a will valued at £15155.