Nelson Leader

Wedding Wednesday – Wilfred Gawthrop and Alice Margaret Hacking

Wilfred Gawthrop is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Joseph Gawthrop and Mary Ellen Snowden. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley – my 3x great grandparents.

Wilfred was born on 1 July 1892 in Trawden, Lancashire.

In the 1911 census Wilfred was working as a “shop assistant to butcher”. By the time of the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2, Wilfred was a “master butcher”.

On 23 April 1935 Wilfred married Alice Margaret Hacking at St. Michael and All Angels’ Church, Foulridge, Lancashire. Details of the wedding were in the Nelson Leader on 26 April 1935 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Wilfred Gawthrop and Alice Margaret Hacking - Nelson Leader 26 April 1935.png

A Pretty Wedding

On Tuesday last, a very pretty wedding was solemnized at St Michael and All Angels’ Church, Foulridge, by the Vicar (Rev J Gough MA), the contracting parties being Mr Wilfred Gawthrop, eldest son of the late Mr Gawthrop and Mrs Gawthrop, of 85, Keighley Road, Colne, and Miss Alice Margaret Hacking, eldest daughter of the late Mr C L Hacking and Mrs Hacking, of “Micklethorn,” Foulridge. The bride, who was given away by her uncle, Mr Giles Collinge, was most charmingly dressed in an ivory silk ninon gown with a Brussels net veil and wreath of orange blossom, with shoes to tone. She carried a wreath of Madonna lillies. The train bearers were Miss B Gawthrop and Miss E Gawthrop (nieces of the bridegroom). She was attended by her sister Miss F M Hacking, and Mrs T Bannister (Blackpool), matron of honour, cousin of the bride, who were attired in dresses of pastel shades of Brussels net, with hats and shoes to tone, and carried bouquets of tulips. Mr J Pickles (friend of the bridegroom) acted as best man, and Mr T Bannister (Blackpool), cousin of the bride, was groomsman.
The hymn “Gracious spirit, Holy Ghost,” was sung, and Mr C Spencer, officiating at the organ, played Mendelssohn’s Wedding March. Mr A Hargreaves, rang a peal on the bells. A reception was held at the Cross Keys, East Marton.
The happy couple were the recipients of many handsome and useful presents. Mr and Mrs Gawthrop later left for a tour of the South, where the honeymoon is being spent.

Strictly Ballroom – Arthur & Mary Louisa Cambage

Mary Louisa Myers is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are Tom Myers and Mary Ellen Procter. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane – my 3x great grandparents.

Mary Louisa was born on 2 May 1899 in Burnley, Lancashire. Sometime in the September quarter of 1922 she married Arthur C Cambage in Burnley.

Now no one could ever accuse me of being able to dance – I have two left feet and no sense of rhythm or coordination whatsoever.

I’m very glad to say that was not the case for Arthur and Mary Cambage – in fact you could say they were the Fred and Ginger of their day in Britain.

According to the newspaper article below Arthur was “the outstanding personality in dancing, not only locally but in many parts of the country, for years”. Either by himself or with Mary he gave dancing demonstrations and was also in demand as a judge at both amateur and professional competitions.

In the 1939 Register Arthur and Mary lived at 19 Broadway, Fleetwood, Lancashire. Arthur was employed by Fleetwood Corporation as Entertainments Manager. Before moving to Fleetwood Arthur had been organising manager at the Nelson Entertainments Company.

The Nelson Leader of 24 January 1936 reported on Arthur and Mary’s impending move to Fleetwood.

Arthur Cambage - Nelson Leader 24 January 1936.png

LEAVING NELSON

MR A C CAMBAGE SECURES IMPORTANT POSITION

MANAGER AT FLEETWOOD’S NEW HALL

Scores of friends and literally thousands of people who know him by sight if not by name will be interested to know that Mr Arthur C Cambage, the organising manager for the Nelson Entertainments Company, Imperial Ballroom, is leaving Nelson shortly to take up the position of manager of the new Marine Hall and sun parlour and colonnades at Fleetwood.
Mr Cambage has been at the Imperial for the last six years, and for several years before was the manager of the Empress Ballroom, Burnley. Undoubtedly Mr Cambage has been the outstanding personality in dancing, not only locally but in many parts of the country, for years. He alone, or accompanied by his wife, has given demonstrations of dancing in London and other big cities, and at one time he was also in great demand as an adjudicator at both amateur and professional dancing competitions. Mr Cambage has also been well-known as a teacher of dancing, a profession which his father and mother were expert in for many years, and his departure from this district will bring an end to the Cambage family’s connection with local entertainments since 1902.
Mrs Arthur Cambage’s departure from the district will also be felt by many organisations in which she has been interested, and particularly the Burnley Garrick Club. She has played many leading roles for the club in productions privately and at the Victoria Theatre, Burnley, and about three years ago she was invited by Col. Robert Loraine to go to London to take part in his productions. Mrs Cambage has also appeared on the concert platform as a pianist, and her fame as a ballroom dancing expert is also well-known.
The position Mr Cambage has secured is regarded as one of the plums of the profession. The Marine Hall at Fleetwood was only opened in November last, and is one of the finest of its kind in the country, the ballroom being most modern and up-tp-date.
Mr and Mrs Cambage will take with them the good wishes of everyone who know them.

So as well as being an extremely accomplished dancer Mary Louisa played the piano and was a leading actress.

Arthur and Mary Louisa spent about eight years in Fleetwood before Arthur took over as manager of the Excel Hotel in Garstang, Lancashire.

Away from the world of entertainment Arthur served in the Army in WW1 for over three years, mostly in France and Belgium. During WW2 he joined the Home Guard in Fleetwood as a private in May 1940, eventually rising to Major and Commanding Officer in May 1944.

Arthur and Mary Louisa both died in 1966.

Black Sheep Sunday – Vera Dawson (nee Mills)

Raymond Dawson is my 1st cousin 1x removed. His parents are Harry Dawson and Leah Owen. Our common ancestors are James Dawson and Emma Buckley – my great grandparents.

Raymond was born on 15 November 1923 in Keighley, West Yorkshire.

Sometime in the September quarter of 1952 Raymond married Vera Mills in Nelson, Lancashire.

About six years later Raymond and Vera appeared in The Nelson Leader on Friday 19 September 1958 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Vera Dawson - Nelson Leader 19 September 1958.png

Man Struck by Car “Thrown in Air”

LEARNER DRIVER IS FINED AT NELSON

Because the pavement was overgrown and not fit to walk on at a point in Barkerhouse Road, Nelson, two couples were walking in the roadway at 10.40 p.m. on Saturday, June 28th. The two husbands were walking together and their wives were some distance behind.
Prosecuting at Nelson Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, Superintendent J.A. Lancaster alleged that the man on the outside, Ronald Howarth, a shop manager, of 137 Cleaver Street, Burnley, was struck from behind by a car, “thrown in the air,” and fell on the bonnet striking his head on the windscreen, which was shattered.
The learner driver of the car, Vera Dawson (35), of 2 Oak Villas, Edith Street, Nelson, was find £5 with £5 7s. 5d. costs and had her licence endorsed for driving without due care and attention. Pleading “not guilty,” Mrs. Dawson told the court that she thought she had passed the two men safely. Mr. Howarth suddenly seemed to turn into the car.
Mr. Howarth, who said he was walking close to the pavement on the outside of Mr. John K. Probert, of 246 Barkerhouse Road, Nelson, told how he was struck from behind. “The next thing I remember was picking myself up off the road,” he said. He was taken to Victoria Hospital at Burnley, where he received treatment for lacerations to the back of the head.
Mr. Probert, who also gave evidence, said it was impossible to walk on the pavement on the near side of the road, and that there was no pavement at all on the other side. He saw a bus approaching up the hill towards them, and then the first indication of anything behind them was “a bump – a crash.” Mr. Howarth was carried by the car from five to 10 yards and dropped into the gutter by the side of the road. The car carried on for quite a distance beyond the point where the accident occurred, probably 20 yards.
Both witnesses agreed with Mr. J. Parry (defending) that if they had been obeying the Highway Code they would not have been walking on that side of the road, but pointed out that there was no refuge at all on the opposite side.
Evidence was given by both wives. Mrs. Howarth said that the car had gone round them, but had not pulled out far enough to get round her husband. She could see there was going to be an accident and shouted, but her husband did not hear and he did not move at all.
Mrs. Probert said that Mr. Howarth seemed to be lifted up on the bonnet of the car. She did not hear the car’s horn sound, and saw no reason why the car should not have pulled out.
Inspector T. Lunn told the court that, facing in the direction of Nelson, the nearside footpath at that point was overgrown and that it was not possible to walk on it.
In a statement by the defendant, which was read in court, she said that because an oncoming bus was level with the men she could not swing out very far. As she passed, one of the men seemed to “step out” and she heard breaking glass.
She told the court that she thought she had passed the men safely, and had no recollection of bringing the car nearer the side of the road after passing the ladies. Asked why she had travelled so far after the accident, she said she thought she had touched the accelerator instead of the brake. She had been startled by shattering glass. Mrs. Dawson, who had been learning to drive for three weeks at that time, said she had only taken over control of the car a few yards before the accident, was only in second gear and travelling between five and 10 miles per hour.
A statement by her husband, Mr. Raymond Dawson, who was in the car with her, was also read. In it he said that as the car drew level with the men the outside one “appeared to turn out, pivoting towards us.” In court, he said he thought the car was safely past until the man appeared to half turn and hit the windscreen with his shoulder. He saw no reason to interfere with his wife’s driving until the accident had happened and she put her foot on the accelerator.
On behalf of his client, Mr. Parry submitted that the people walking in the road were not obeying all the rules laid down in the Highway Code and were apparently making no effort to see if there was any traffic coming behind them. He maintained that there was sufficient conflict of evidence to justify the case being dismissed.

 

Sunday’s Obituary – George Dacre Crewdson (1890-1943)

Clara Shackleton is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are James Shackleton and Mary Elizabeth Haworth. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane – my 3x great grandparents.

Clara was born on 20 April 1900 and her birth was registered in Burnley, Lancashire.

On 30 August 1922 Clara married George Dacre Crewdson at Holy Trinity Church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

George was born on 8 June 1890 – his birth was also registered in Burnley.

When the 1939 Register was taken on 29 September 1939 George and Clara were living at 7 Church Street, Briercliffe, Burnley. George was employed as a “cotton loom overlooker” and Clara’s occupation was described as “unpaid domestic duties”. Also living with them were two children – Eveline and James. Their first daughter, Irene, was born in 1923 but sadly died the same year.

Within three and half years Clara would be left a widow with two children following the death of George at the age of 52.

The Nelson Leader of 29 January 1943 reported on George’s death as a result of what at first appears to be an innocuous incident at work.

George Daker Crewdson - Nelson Leader 29 January 1943.png

Fatal Pin-prick

OVERLOOKER’S DEATH FROM SEPTICAEMIA

A pin-prick sustained while handling pickers at Primrose Mill, Harle Syke, was held responsible for the death of George Dacre Crewdson (51), 7 Church Street, Briercliffe, a power loom overlooker employed by the South View Manufacturing Company, when the East Lancashire Coroner (Mr F Rowland) conducted an inquest at Brierfield Town Hall on Wednesday morning.
The widow was represented by Mr Riley; Mr Howarth appeared on behalf of the employers, and Miss Blackburn, H M Inspector of Factories, was also present.
The widow, Mrs Clara Crewdson, said her husband was a healthy man and never had a serious illness. During the evening of Friday January 8th, he complained that the first finger on his right hand was sore, and said he had got something in it at his work, but he did not say when. He explained that he was putting some pickers on and caught his finger on one of these, but whether it was a piece of hide or not which had entered the finger he did not know. Whatever it was, it had burnt in owing to the picker being hot. He bathed the finger in hot water and applied a poultice, but despite further treatment, the infection became worse. He followed his employment until 5.30pm on Wednesday, January 13th, and on the 15th consulted Dr Lamberti, who treated the injury and ordered her husband to go to Victoria Hospital the following day. He paid two visits to the hospital, and ought to have gone there again on the 18th, but he was too ill to do so. Dr Lamberti, and later Dr Munroe, visited him frequently, and on the 21st a surgeon was called in. Despite this attention, however, her husband died last Saturday.
Sam Riley, another overlooker employed at Primrose Mill, said he was in the storeroom during the afternoon of January 11th, and in the course of a conversation Crewdson said he had injured the first finger of his right hand, at the same time holding up the bandaged finger, which was afterwards seen by other employees.
Dr Lamberti said the finger was septic when Crewdson first consulted him on January 15th. It was incised at the hospital, but the man’s condition grew worse, and his death on the 23rd was the result of septicaemia. Witness added that when he first examined the finger he found a small pin-prick between the first and second joints.
Witness agreed with Mr Riley that this could have been caused by a splinter which entered the finger as the man’s hand slid over the picker.
Dr Palin, Police Surgeon for the Brierfield district, said the post-mortem examination revealed the cause of death to be septic pneumonia due to infection from the finger. As the finger was very swollen the point of entry had passed away.
Witness agreed with Mr Riley that the medical history from January 8th onwards was consistent with the man having met with such an injury.
The Coroner said there had been great doubt as to the continuity between the alleged injury and the man’s death, but that had now been cleared away. He was quite satisfied that Crewdson did injure his finger in the way he had said at his work. Evidently it was just a pin-prick, and the man probably did not think at first that it was serious; nevertheless, he and his wife applied the necessary treatment from the outset. The man, being a conscientious workman, continued to follow his employment until he consulted the doctor on the 15th, but by that time septicaemia had got hold, and this caused his death. There was a chain of cause and effect between the injury and the man’s death, therefore the proper verdict was one of “Accidental death”. The Coroner said he did not doubt that the injury was caused while the man was following his employment, and deeply sympathised with the widow.
Mr Howarth expressed the regret of the employers, who recognised that they had lost a conscientious workman, and Mr Riley suitably replied on behalf of the widow.

Clara remarried to Smith Bannister sometime in the fourth quarter of 1946. She passed away in 1966 in Blackpool, Lancashire.

Wedding Wednesday – Frederick Joseph Smithson and Nancy Proudfoot

Nancy Proudfoot is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Arthur Proudfoot and Ellen Ann Myers. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane, my 3x great grandparents.

Nancy was born on 8 Aug 1919 in Auckland, Durham.

On 19 October 1940 Nancy married Frederick Joseph Smithson at the Burnley Registry Office. Details of their wedding were published in the Nelson Leader on 25 October 1940.

Frederick Smithson & Nancy Proudfoot wedding.png

The marriage was solemnised at Burnley Registry Office, on Saturday, between Platoon Sergeant Major Frederick J Smithson, eldest son of Mrs and the late Mr F Smithson, of 23 Mosley Street, Nelson, and Miss Nancy Proudfoot, youngest daughter of Mr and Mrs A Proudfoot, of 146 Hibson Road, Nelson. The bridegroom is a member of the Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire) having served for a period of sixteen and a half years; the bride is employed as a cotton winder at Messrs Pemberton’s Clover Hill Mills.

Attired in an Air Force blue coat with navy blue accessories, the bride was attended by her sister, Miss Mary Proudfoot, who wore a Mulberry three piece suit. The duties of best man were discharged by Sergeant R Roebuck, of the Border Regiment, a colleague of the bridegroom. The future residence is 23 Mosley Street, Nelson.