My Family

Posts about my family

Black Sheep Sunday – Eddie Price

Eddie Price is my 1st cousin 1x removed. His parents are Edward Price and Leah Musgrove. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner – my great grandparents.

Eddie was born on 23 March 1929 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

I found Eddie in the local newspaper, the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times twice in the space of eight months. He was in trouble with the police for motoring offences.

Clitheroe Advertiser and Times – Friday 26 August 1949 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Eddie Price - CAT 26 August 1949.png

Motor Cyclist Fined

Pleading guilty to driving a motor cycle with no white front light, being the holder of a provisional driving licence and not displaying “L” plates at the front and rear of the cycle, and to carrying a passenger other than a qualified driver, Eddie Price (20), of 24 Larkhill Cottages, Old Landgho, was fined a total of £1 at Clitheroe County Magistrates Court on Monday.

Eight months later Eddie was involved in a more serious offence. If this had happened in more recent times it would certainly have been a candidate for Police Interceptors on the telly!!

Clitheroe Advertiser and Times – Friday 14 April 1950 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Eddie Price - CAT 14 April 1950.png

Easter Saturday Police Chase At Whalley

A NIGHT chase at Whalley was described at Blackburn on Monday when Eddie Price (21) farm labourer, Larkhill Cottages, Langho, was charged with taking away a car without the owner’s consent, driving it without an insurance policy, and while disqualified from holding a licence. He was fined a total of £15 and disqualified from driving for 12 months.
Evidence was that the car was missed from outside shop premises in Whalley New Road, Blackburn, on Saturday night.
Its description was circulated by wireless and the car was seen parked just outside Whalley by P.C.s Wood and Ellison, stationed at Whalley. As they approached the vehicle, they heard footsteps and saw the prisoner running away. They gave chase but lost him in the dark.

BEHIND DOOR

Price was eventually found, crouching behind the shippon door of a nearby farm. He told the police later: “It is a long walk from Blackburn. I took it.”
Price asked for another case of taking away a car from the Union Street car park, Blackburn, in March, to be taken into consideration.
Chairman of the Bench, (Alderman J. Charnley) complimented the constables in the manner in which Price had been caught.

 

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Wedding Wednesday – Alan Crossley and Mary Dorothy Hanson

Alan Crossley is my 2nd cousin 1x removed. His parents are John Crossley and Isabella Musgrove. Our common ancestors are Harrison Musgrove and Jane Rooking – my 2x great grandparents.

Alan was born on 17 March 1914 in Clitheroe, Lancashire. By all accounts Alan was an exceptional musician, organist and choirmaster – this will be the subject of a future blog post all on its own.

On 9 September 1939 Alan married Mary Dorothy Hanson at St. Helen’s Church, Waddington, Lancashire. Details of the wedding were in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on Friday 15 September 1939 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Alan Crossley & Mary Hanson - CAT 15 September 1939.png

CROSSLEY – HANSON

Many friends were present at St. Helen’s Church, Waddington, last Saturday, to witness the wedding of Mr. Alan Crossley, organist and choirmaster at St. Paul’s Church, Low Moor, and Miss Mary Dorothy Hanson, organist at St. Catherine’s Church, West Bradford.
The nuptials were performed by the Rev. W. G. Jones, M.A., vicar of Waddington, assisted by the Rev. I. Pugh, vicar of Low Moor. The service was fully choral. Mr. Harry Dyson was at the organ, and the choir was composed of representatives of St. Mary’s Parish Church, Clitheroe, St. Paul’s, Low Moor, St. Helen’s, Waddington, and St. Catherine’s, West Bradford.
The bride, given away by her brother-in-law, Mr. F. Tomlinson, wore a dress of mist blue with petunia sash, spray of fuchsia to tone, light blue hat, and accessories to match. She carried an ivory backed prayer book, the gift of Sunday School teachers and scholars at St. Helen’s.
As bridesmaid, Miss Mary Boothman (friend of the bride) was dressed in a pastel shade of pink, with spray of cream roses, brown hat, gloves, and shoes, and she carried a handbag to tone, which was the bridegroom’s gift.
Mr. J. R. Barnes, a member of the choir at St. Paul’s, was best man, and Mr. H. Tomlinson, nephew of the bride, groomsman.
The numerous presents received included and eiderdown from the bride’s employer, Mr. Peter Harrison; a dinner service from the bridegroom’s colleagues of the Inland Revenue Staff, Nelson; a duet piano stool from the members of the Clitheroe String Orchestra; a pair of exhibition pictures (by J. Hindle Higson) from St. Paul’s Church Choir; and a set of Pyrex dishes from St. Catherine’s Choir.
On their return from the honeymoon, which is being spent at Harrogate, Mr. and Mrs. Crossley will reside at 18 Hargreaves Street, Nelson.

Workday Wednesday – Samuel S Stobbs

Samuel S Stobbs is the husband of my 1st cousin 2x removed, Mary Ellen Musgrove.

Mary Ellen was born on 3 January 1893 at Horton in Ribblesdale in the Yorkshire Dales. Her parents are George Albert Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Stoup. Our common ancestors are Harrison Musgrove and Jane Rooking – my 2x great grandparents.

Mary Ellen and Samuel married in Clitheroe, Lancashire sometime in the June quarter of 1919. In the 1939 Register they were living at Hayhurst Street, Clitheroe. At that time Samuel was working as an asphalt / tarmac mixer on the highways.

About ten years earlier Samuel was working at the local lime works in Clitheroe and was involved in an accident with a conveyor. Details were reported in the Burnley News on 3 March 1928 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Samuel S Stobbs - Burnley News 3 March 1928.png

LIME WORKS ACCIDENT

At Horrocksford Lime Works, Clitheroe, on Wednesday afternoon, Samuel S. Stobbs, 33 Hayhurst Street, was caught by a conveyor – an endless chain of buckets used for taking broken stone from one part of the works to the other. He had been lifted off his feet when a work-mate, W. Preston, ran to the machine and stopped it.
When extricated, Stobbs was found to have dislocated his ankle. After attention by Dr. Cooper he was taken to Blackburn Infirmary.

I can’t help thinking this could have been a lot worse for Samuel if his work-mate had not seen what was happening and acted very quickly to shut down the machine.

Sunday’s Obituary – Esther Ann Salt (nee Espley) 1866-1935

Esther Ann Espley is my wife’s 3rd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are John Espley and Emma Gibson. Their common ancestor is John Aspley – my wife’s 4x great grandfather.

Esther was born on 12 December 1866 – her birth is registered in Leek, Staffordshire. Esther’s mother Emma Gibson came from Spalding in Lincolnshire. So eighteen months after Esther’s birth the family travelled over 100 miles to Lincolnshire where Esther was baptised at a small village called Cowbit – about three miles from Spalding – on 14 June 1868.

Just over twenty years later, on 17 July 1888 Esther married Alfred Salt at Saints Philip & James, Milton, Staffordshire. Over the next 22 years Alfred and Esther had 11 children.

Esther passed away on Friday 24 May 1935. Details of her funeral were published in the Tamworth Herald on Saturday 1 June 1935 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Esther Ann Salt (nee Espley) - Tamworth Herald 1 June 1935.png

FUNERAL – The funeral took place in the Amington Cemetery on Wednesday, the Rev. H. Chamberlain officiating, of Mrs. Alfred Salt, who passed away on Friday, at School Lane, Amington, aged 68 years. She was highly respected, having resided in Amington for over 35 years. The chief mourners were: Mr. Alfred Salt (widower); Messrs. John William Salt, Alfred Salt, Albert Salt, Joseph Salt, Frederick George Salt (sons); Mesdames J. Smith, S. Chappell, A.W. Chappell, Mrs. G. Hill (daughters); Mr. and Mrs. A. Allcock (brother and sister-iin-law); Mrs. L. Kelsey (sister-in-law, Hanley); Messrs. J. Smith, S. Chappell, G. Hill (sons-in-law); Mrs J. W. Salt (daughter-in-law); and Mr. W. Kelsea (nephew, of Hanley). There was a large number of beautiful floral tributes from the family, the neighbours, and the Amington Liberal Workingmen’s Club, of which Mr. Alfred Salt, jun., is the secretary. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr. H. Starkey, of Tamworth.

Wedding Wednesday -Barbara Eccles and Edwin Charles Ross

Barbara Eccles is my 2nd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Joseph Eccles and Martha Musgrove. Our common ancestors are Harrison Musgrove and Jane Rooking – my 2x great grandparents.

Barbara was born on 11 February 1925 in Clitheroe, Lancashire. She was the only child of Joseph and Martha.

In the 1939 Register (taken at the outbreak of WW2), at the age of 14, Barbara was working as a “warehouse clerk” for a textile firm.

Three years later on 14 September 1942 Barbara married Edwin Ross at St Paul’s Church, Clitheroe. Details of their wedding were in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 18 September (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Barbara Eccles & Edwin Ross - CAT 18 September 1942.png

ROSS – ECCLES

Miss Barbara Eccles, only daughter of Mr and Mrs J Eccles, of 8, Franklin Street, Clitheroe, was married on Monday, at St Paul’s Church, Low Moor, to Mr Edwin Charles Ross, second son of Mrs and the late Mr I Ross, of 12, Western Road, Aldershot.
Given away by her father, the bride wore a white satin gown with a headdress of orange blossom, and carried a bouquet of pink carnations. As bridesmaid, Miss A Stobbs (cousin of the bride) wore a gown of mauve slipper satin, with headdress to tone, and carried a bouquet of pink rosebuds. Cpl. A Pitt was best man, and the ceremony was performed by the Rev I Pugh, with Mr J Ford at the organ.
The bridegroom’s gift to the bride was a canteen of cutlery and a gold necklace, whilst he also gave a gold necklace to the bridesmaid. The bride gave the bridegroom a gold signet ring.
Following a reception at Carey’s Cafe, Mr and Mrs Ross left for London and Aldershot, the bride travelling in a burgundy dress, with a blue coat and hat to tone.

Black Sheep Sunday – Elizabeth Espley (nee Stanier)

Elizabeth Stanier is the wife of my wife’s 3rd cousin 2x removed, Joseph Espley.

Joseph was born sometime in the September quarter of 1881 in Leek, Staffordshire. His parents are John Espley and Emma Gibson. The common ancestor of John and my wife is John Aspley – my wife’s 4x great grandfather.

Joseph married Elizabeth Stanier sometime in the December quarter of 1907 – the marriage is registered at Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire. There were four children born over the next five years:-

May – 1908
Joseph – 1909
Reginald Joseph – 1911
Doris – 1912

In the 1911 census the family are living at Percy Street, Longton, Stoke-on-Trent and Joseph is working as a “tailor marker”.

In the summer of 1925 Joseph died – his death is registered in the third quarter of that year.

Three years later Elizabeth found herself in the Hanley Stipendiary Court as reported in the Staffordshire Advertiser on 8 September 1928 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Elizabeth Espley (nee Stanier) - Staffordshire Advertiser 8 Septemer 1928.png

At Hanley Stipendiary Court, on Monday, Elizabeth Espley, a widow, residing in Anchor Road, Longton, was sentenced to six weeks’ imprisonment on a summons for knowingly making a false representation for the purpose of obtaining an additional allowance under the Widows and Orphans’ Pension Act. Defendant did not appear, but a solicitor, who prosecuted on behalf of the Ministry of Health, stated that she signed a declaration that her daughter, Doris, aged 16, was still attending a day school, whereas the girl had left school. As a result of the untrue statement defendant had wrongfully obtained the sum of £13 5s.

Elizabeth didn’t remarry and she died in early 1955 – her death is registered in the March quarter in Stoke-on-Trent.

Sunday’s Obituary – Charles Neville (1877-1955)

Charles Neville (often spelt as Nevill in official records) is the husband of my wife’s 2nd cousin 2x removed, Sarah Jane Espley.

Sarah’s parents are Henry Espley and Ellen Hannah Clewley. The link with Sarah is from my wife’s 3x great grandparents James Espley and Martha Silvester.

Charles was born on 1 June 1877 in Lichfield, Staffordshire. He married Sarah Jane sometime in the fourth quarter of 1897 in Lichfield.

Charles passed away on 17 September 1955. The Lichfield Mercury carried his obituary on Friday 23 September 1955 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Charles Neville - Lichfield Mercury 25 September 1955.png

Former Member of Bower Committee

LICHFIELD DEATH OF MR. C. NEVILLE

A native of the city Mr. Charles Neville (78), 137 Sandford Street, Lichfield died on Saturday.
Mr. Neville was born in Beacon Street, but at an early age his parents moved to Sandford Street where he had resided ever since. A painter and journeyman, Mr. Neville had been employed by Lichfield City Council and after retiring four years ago he obtained a situation on the maintenance staff of the Wiltell Works in St. John Street.
Mr. Neville was a keen supporter of local football and was trainer for the Lichfield Phoenix club when they played on a ground at Gaia Fields. He had also served in a similar capacity with Lichfield United, whose ground was at the Barn Field in St. John Street. His interest in the sport never waned and up to the time of his death he followed the St. Chad’s club going to most of the away matches. For many years he was a member of the Greenhill Bower committee and rendered good service particularly with the decoration of tableaux.
Mr. Neville is survived by his wife, four daughters and five sons. The funeral took place at Christ Church on Wednesday, the vicar (Rev. G. H. Maydew), officiating.