Skipton

Grave Search at Rylstone, North Yorkshire

A day out in the Yorkshire Dales today looking for the gravestone of my 2x great grandparents James Paley and Mary Ann Paley (nee Spink).

I knew that they were buried at St Peter’s church in Rylstone, North Yorkshire, about seven miles north of Skipton.

P1010907.jpeg

So we set off this morning under grey clouds and rain. It’s only about an hour or so from our home and by the time we got there the weather had improved – although we got wet feet tramping through the grass in the grave yard.

Anyway we found the grave and I will post a blog story and photo’s next week.

St Peter’s was built in 1852-1853 to a design by the Lancaster architect E G Paley (as far as I can tell he is no relation to my Paley’s) replacing an earlier church on the site. Its total cost was £1700 (equivalent to £160,000 in 2015).

P1010919.jpeg

The church is a Grade II Listed Building and is an active Anglican church in the deanery of Skipton, the archdeaconry of Craven and the diocese of Bradford.

The churchyard contains four war graves, of a Yorkshire Regiment officer and Royal Navy seaman of the First World War and a Royal Artillery soldier and airman of the Second World War. We didn’t see those graves today so I think another visit is required.

Note the obligatory grazing sheep in our rural churchyards.

Workday Wednesday – John Dawson (Engine Tenter)

Workday Wednesday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

Here’s a way to document your ancestors’ occupations (they weren’t all farmers), transcripts of SS-5s, photos and stories of ancestors at work, announcements of retirements, etc.

John Dawson is my 1st cousin 4x removed. His parents are John Dawson and Elizabeth Benson. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson, my 4x great grandparents.

John married Sarah Hopkinson sometime in the Summer of 1857. The marriage is registered in Q3 at Skipton, Yorkshire.

John’s main occupation as described in the census returns for 1871, 1881 and 1891 is “engine tenter”. I have mentioned John in an earlier post here.  He followed in the footsteps of his father and grandfather (my 4x great grandfather – John Dawson) of looking after the machines and engines at Ickornshaw Mill in Cowling, West Yorkshire.

I must admit I hadn’t given much thought to how difficult and dangerous the job of “engine tenter” might be – that is until I came across the following article from the Burnley Express of 6 March 1886.

Burnley Express - 6 March 1886.png

ACCIDENT – On Friday week, John Dawson, engine-tenter, Barrowford, met with an accident. He and three or four other workmen were fixing a new beam-key in the engine-house at Mr Barrowclough’s mill, when suddenly the jenny chain which had been used for raising the beam broke, and the beam fell with a force of over ten tons on Dawson’s left hand, cutting off two fingers, and holding the man fast with the long finger, which had subsequently to be amputated. The accident happened in the chamber of the engine shed, and Dawson, realising his position, kept from falling below. A new chain was procured, and Dawson was released. The hand has been dressed by Dr Pim.

As it turned out 1886 would continue to be a difficult year for John – he appears in the next two instalments of Black Sheep Sunday together with his wife Sarah.

Sunday’s Obituary – Martin Gawthrop (1892-1951)

Sunday’s Obituary is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Sunday’s Obituary, post obituaries along with other information about that person.

Martin Gawthrop is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Fred Gawthrop and Margaret Ann Slater. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley (my 3x great grandparents).

Martin was born on 4 March 1892 and his birth is registered at Burnley, Lancashire.

He first appears in the 1901 census living with his parents in Embsay, near Skipton, Yorkshire. Ten years later the 1911 census shows the family living at 7 Sawley Street, Skipton. Martin is working as a “cotton warp dresser”.

Early in 1912 Martin married Isabella Brierley. The marriage is registered in Skipton in Q1.

Martin and Isabella had four children:-

Harold – born 3 July 1912
Martin – born 1916
Irene – born 1924
Vera – born 1925

The family are still living in Skipton at the time of the 1939 Register at the outbreak of WW2 and Martin continues to work as a “warp dresser”.

Sadly Isabella died before the end of 1943 at the age of 51 – her death is registered in Q4 at Keighley, West Yorkshire

Martin then remarried about a year later to Sarah Hannah Cooper – this marriage is registered in Skipton in the December quarter 1944.

The following article from the Barnoldswick & Early Times of 13 July 1951 reports on Martin’s death.

barnoldswick-earby-times-13-july-1951

Mr Martin Gawthrop

We regret to report the death of Mr Martin Gawthrop, of 58 Emmott Lane, Laneshawbridge, which occurred on July 7th. Mr Gawthrop was 59. The interment took place at Skipton Cemetery on Tuesday, the Rev W E Burkitt officiating.

Floral tokens were sent by the following:- Mrs M Gawthrop; Mr and Mrs H Gawthrop; Mr and Mrs Lynch; Mr and Mrs Cooper; Mr and Mrs Hodgson; Mr and Mrs Whitaker and Mr Barker; Mr and Mrs Swales and family; Mr and Mrs Varley and Mrs Dobson.

The undertakers were Colne Co-operative Society.

Sarah lived for nearly four more years and eventually passed away at the age of 65 on 23 February 1955 in the Reedyford Hospital, Nelson, Lancashire.

Tuesday’s Tip – Probate Records

Tuesday’s Tip is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

What advice would you give to another genealogist or family historian, especially someone just starting out? Remember when you were new to genealogy? Wasn’t it great to find tips and tricks that worked for others?

Albert Edward Dawson is my 4th cousin 1x removed. His mother was Mary Dawson. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson, my 4x great grandparents.

As far as I can establish there was nothing significant or exceptional about Albert’s life. He was born on 12 January 1906 in Barrowford, Lancashire. In the 1911 census Albert is living at 42 Gordon Street, Colne, Lancashire, with his mother Mary, his widowed grandmother Ann Dawson (nee Hargreaves) and his uncle James (Mary’s brother).

I have a marriage for Albert sometime in the June quarter of 1931 in Burnley, Lancashire, to Doris Ainsworth.

In the 1939 Register Albert and Doris are living at 3 Park Hill, Barrowford, Lancashire. They are both described as a “cotton weaver.”

I haven’t been able to find a death record for Doris. It is possible that she remarried at some point. But I can’t find a matching record for a marriage either – so she remains a mystery for now.

However I have found a death for Albert Edward Dawson in Staincliffe, West Yorkshire, in the December quarter of 1972.

Straightforward on the face of it. However, my tip is to always check the probate records to see if there is a will. This can sometimes be very useful – you might find information about other relatives who are beneficiaries of the will; you might find that your relative died in a particular hospital or at home; you might find details of their last address; you should find some information about the value of the estate; and you might find other interesting information.

Which is precisely what happened in the case of Albert Edward Dawson. Below is the entry from the England & Wales National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations) from www.ancestry.co.uk

albert-edward-dawson-probate

You will see that I now have the last known address of Albert at the time of his death – 1 Park Lane Cottages, Cowling, Keighley. Also that he was last known to be alive on 23 October 1972 and his dead body was found on 30 October 1972.

I don’t know the circumstances of his death or where his body was found.

There doesn’t appear to be anything in the newspaper archives at www.findmypast.co.uk. I have been to the library at Skipton to search their newspaper archives because some of the local papers are not included in the Find My Past records.

So far I haven’t been able to find any report of Albert going missing or of his dead body being found in suspicious circumstances or otherwise.

However I only know that there is something unusual about his death because of the information available from the probate records. So remember that the probate records can be a valuable genealogy resource.

Sunday Snap – Cononley Gala

This is a photograph taken probably sometime in the 1950’s or 1960’s I think. The woman in the long “short’ pants is my great aunt Jessie Brown (nee Hurtley).

I can’t be sure but I believe the picture was probably taken at the time of the Cononley Gala. They are carrying collecting tins and are no doubt intent on fleecing gala visitors of their hard earned cash!!!

Cononley is a small village in Airedale, Yorkshire about three miles south of Skipton. The village is an important place in my family history. During his childhood my dad spent many happy times here staying with his aunts and uncles.

Here is a link to the Cononley Village Website. The 2012 village gala was held yesterday and you can see photographs from last year on the website.