Elizabeth Ann Turner

Sunday’s Obituary – Mary Patricia Lord (1940-1951)

Mary Patricia Lord is my 2nd cousin. Her parents are John Edward Lord and Marjorie Musgrove. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

Mary was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire. Her birth is registered in the March quarter of 1940.

I already knew that she had died at the very young of eleven. And while researching the newspaper archives for my post about her father (see link above) I came across the following story from the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 24 August 1951.

Mary Patricia Lord - CAT 24 August 1951.png

Inquest Verdicts On Victims Of Clitheroe Accidents

Verdicts of “accidental death” were returned at Blackburn inquests on Friday on 11-year-old Mary Patricia Lord, of 5, Beech Street, Clitheroe, who died from injuries received when she fell from her cycle, and on 68-year-old Samuel Cook, a patient of Clitheroe Hospital, who was knocked down by a car outside the hospital and later died in Blackburn Royal Infirmary.

Described by witnesses as “a very careful rider,” Pat, who was given the cycle as a present when she passed the examination for entrance to Clitheroe Grammar School, lost control when her foot slipped from the pedal, while riding in Peel Street, last Tuesday.

She fell, struck her head on the kerb-edge, and died the following day in Blackburn Royal Infirmary.

The jury returned their verdict without retiring.

So Marjorie (my 1st cousin 1x removed) lost her husband in WW2 after less than five years of marriage and then her daughter at the age of eleven.

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Military Monday – John Edward Lord (1917-1944)

John Edward Lord is the husband of my 1st cousin 1x removed, Marjorie Musgrove. Marjorie’s parents are James Musgrove and Edith Jane Hibble. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

John Edward was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire on 16 December 1917 to parents Edmund and Betty Lord (nee Capstick).

John and Marjorie married on 19 August 1939 at Clitheroe Congregational Church – I posted a newspaper report of their marriage last week – here. They had one daughter, Mary Patricia who was born in 1940.

John served in the 2nd Battalion, Coldstream Guards in WW2. His service number was 2659738.

In the Winter months of 1944 the 2nd Coldstream Guards took part in the Battle for Monte Ornito in the mountains of Italy from 8 February to 20 February. It was in this battle that John lost his life. According to the newspaper reports below John suffered chest wounds on 17th February and died in hospital on 20 February.

Clitheroe Advertiser and Times – 3 March 1944

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GUARDSMAN KILLED IN ACTION

News was received by his wife yesterday that Guardsman John Edward Lord, eldest son of Mr and Mrs E Lord, of 29, Pendle Road, Clitheroe, had been killed in action in Italy. Twnety-five years of age, Guardsman Lord joined the Army shortly after the outbreak of war, leaving his employment as a conductor with the Ribble Motor Services. His brother, Ronald, a member of the local Territorial unit, is a prisoner of war. General sympathy will be accorded his wife and child, who live at 27, Chatburn Road, and his parents, in their sorrow.

 

 

 

 

Clitheroe Advertiser and Times – 10 March 1944

John E Lord - CAT 10 March 1944

Mrs Lord, of Chatburn Road, Clitheroe, has received a letter from a chaplain in which he says that her husband, Guardsman John E Lord, whose death on active service we reported last week, died in hospital on February 20th, after being admitted on the 17th, suffering from chest wounds. “Everything humanly possible was done for him, and he showed great patience and courage.” the chaplain says. “He made a great fight for his life, and died peacefully. He lies buried in a little English cemetery in beautiful country in the Italian hills. A simple wooden cross is placed on his grave.”

Clitheroe Advertiser and Times – 24 March 1944

John E Lord - CAT 24 March 1944.png

 

MEMORIAL SERVICE

A portion of the morning service at Clitheroe Congregational Church, on Sunday, was set apart in remembrance of Guardsman John E Lord, who died of wounds in Italy. At the close of his sermon, the Rev J A Sinclair said: “We are today honouring one and thinking lovingly and gratefully of one who has laid down his life in the hope that it was not in vain. We are not out to glorify war, for war in itself has no glory; but we wish to pay our token of respect and esteem to one of our young men, John Ernest Lord, the fourth on our Honour Roll of those who have passed on. We did not have him long here, having come to us after the closing of Mount Zion Chapel, but long enough to know him fairly intimately. We shall remember him as quiet and unassuming, but willing to give himself courageously and unselfishly that tyranny and oppression might not strut across the earth in all its proud boastfulness and hideousness.”

John Edward Lord is buried at Minturno War Cemetery in Italy. His grave is marked by a cross with inscription:-

HE DIED THAT WE MIGHT LIVE

The following information is from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website.

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Minturno War Cemetery

On 3 September 1943 the Allies invaded the Italian mainland, the invasion coinciding with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side. Allied objectives were to draw German troops from the Russian front and more particularly from France, where an offensive was planned for the following year. Progress through southern Italy was rapid despite stiff resistance, but by the end of October, the Allies were facing the German winter defensive position known as the Gustav Line, which stretched from the river Garigliano in the west to the Sangro in the east. Initial attempts to breach the western end of the line were unsuccessful and it was not until 17 January 1944 that the Garigliano was crossed, and Minturno taken two days later. The site for the cemetery was chosen in January 1944, but the Allies then lost some ground and the site came under German small-arms fire. The cemetery could not be used again until May 1944 when the Allies launched their final advance on Rome and the US 85th and 88th Divisions were in this sector. The burials are mainly those of the heavy casualties incurred in crossing the Garigliano in January. Minturno War Cemetery contains 2,049 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. The cemetery was designed by Louis de Soissons.

Wedding Wednesday – Marjorie Musgrove and John Edward Lord

Marjorie Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. Her parents are James Musgrove and Edith Jane Hibble. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

Marjorie was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire in 1921.

On 19 August 1939 Marjorie married John Edward Lord at Clitheroe Congregational Church. A report of the wedding was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 25 August 1939.

Marjorie Musgrove & John E Lord wedding.png

LORD — MUSGROVE

On Saturday last, at Clitheroe Congregational Church, the Rev. J. A. Sinclair performed the nuptials of Mr. John Edward Lord, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Lord, of 29 Pendle Road, and Miss Marjorie Musgrove, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. Musgrove, 15 Woone Lane.

The bride, given away by her father, was gowned in blue satin, with tight fitting sleeves and heart shaped neck-line. The veil was surmounted by a halo of flowers, the bouquet being composed of pink carnations, orange blossom and white heather.

The bridesmaids were Miss B. Musgrove (sister) and Miss A. Lord, of Blackburn, the bridegroom’s cousin. They were gowned in pale pink lace over slips of a similar shade, trimmed with pale blue ribbon, the pink veils being surmounted by floral halos. Pink and mauve sweet peas formed the bouquets.

The best man was Mr. R. Lord, and the groomsman Mr. T. Hibble. The church had been specially decorated with pink carnations by Mrs. Ratcliffe, and Mr. A. Taylor was at the organ. As they left the church, bride and bridegroom were presented with a silver horse-shoe by Mrs. Preston.

The bridegroom’s gift to the bride was a gold wristlet watch, and dress rings to the bridesmaids. The bride presented the bridegroom with gold cuff-links. A reception was held at the Starkie Arms Hotel. Mr. and Mrs. Lord are residing at 27 Chatburn Road.

Military Monday – Robert Scott (1908-1941)

Robert Scott is the husband of my grand aunt, Alice Musgrove. Alice’s parents are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner (my great grandparents).

Robert was born in Clitheroe in 1908 to parents Joseph Henry Scott and Isabella Cochrane – his birth is registered in the June quarter. Sometime in the first quarter of 1932 Robert married Alice Musgrove.

In 1938 Robert signed up for service with the Royal Artillery – his service number was 1454063.

When war eventually came Robert was assigned as a Gunner to the 156th (East Lancashire) Battery 52nd Light Anti Aircraft Regiment.

Robert was killed in action on 2 June 1941 in Crete.

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News of his death appeared in The Clitheroe Advertiser and Times in an article on Friday 27 June 1941.

Robert Scott - Clitheroe A&T 27 June 1941

Robert is buried at Suda Bay War Cemetery, Greece. The following information is from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

In May 1941, the Commonwealth force in Crete was organised in five widely separated defence areas along the north coast – around the three airfields at Iraklion, Rethymnon and Maleme, and at Suda Bay and the port of Chania. The Germans launched their attack on 20 May with airborne troops. The airfield at Maleme was quickly captured and used for landing German reinforcements. On 23 May, the remainder of the Maleme position had to be given up and its defenders fell back to Chania. On 26 May, the Allied line west of Chania was broken. Suda Bay became indefensible and the troops from these two positions, with the remainder of the Maleme garrison, withdrew across the island to Sfakion, where many of them were evacuated by sea on the nights of the 28 – 31 May. The airborne attacks on the Iraklion and Rethymnon positions on 20 May were repulsed. Iraklion was successfully defended until the night of 29/29 May when the garrison was evacuated by sea. Orders for the Rethymnon garrison to fight its way southward for evacuation did not arrive, and it was overwhelmed on 31 May. Of the total Commonwealth land force of 32,000 men, 18,000 were evacuated, 12,000 were taken prisoner and 2,000 were killed. The site of Suda Bay War Cemetery was chosen after the war and graves were moved there by 21st and 22nd Australian War Graves Units from the four burial grounds that had been established by the German occupying forces at Chania, Iraklion, Rethymnon and Galata, and from isolated sites and civilian cemeteries. There are now 1,500 Commonwealth servicemen of the Second World War buried or commemorated in the cemetery. 776 of the burials are unidentified but special memorials commemorate a number of casualties believed to be buried among them. The cemetery also contains 19 First World War burials brought in from Suda Bay Consular Cemetery, 1 being unidentified. There are also 7 burials of other nationalities and 37 non-war burials.

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Suda Bay War Cemetery, Greece

Sunday’s Obituary – John Turner (1876-1926)

John Turner is my great grand uncle – he is the brother of my great grandmother Elizabeth Ann Musgrove (nee Turner). His parents are Thomas Turner (1848-1916) and Mary Jane Carradice (1854-1917) – my 2x great grandparents.

John was born in Kendal, Westmorland and his birth is registered in the March quarter of 1876. He was baptised on the 2 April 1876.

In the 1881 and 1891 census returns John is living with his parents and siblings in Settle, Yorkshire. In 1891 at the age of 14 his occupation is described as “hawker”.

John married Elizabeth Ann Gornall sometime in Q4 1900 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

In the 1901 census John and Elizabeth are living at 50 Taylor Street, Clitheroe with his older sister Elizabeth Ann and her husband Joseph Musgrove (my great grandparents). John is working as a general labourer.

Ten years later Johns still working as a general labourer and in the 1911 census John and Elizabeth are living at 13 Grimshaw Street, Clitheroe together with five children:-

Mary Ellen – born 1901
Catherine – born 1902
Annie – born 1905
Maria – born 1906
James – born 1907

They also had two other children who died as babies – John Thomas in 1903 and Elizabeth in 1909.

John and Elizabeth went on to have four more children:-

Winifred – born 1912
Ivy – born 1913
George Henry – born 1914
Florence – born 1915

As far as I can tell Elizabeth Ann died sometime in early 1919 at the age of 37 – her death is registered in Q1 in Clitheroe. I don’t know what happened to all the children at that time – some were still very young. I can only guess that they were cared for by relatives or even entered the workhouse.

I found the following newspaper article in the Lancashire Evening Post of 18 January 1926 detailing the circumstances of John’s death. It’s sometimes difficult to know that you have the right person in newspaper articles, especially with a fairly common name as John Turner. However the report says that he was living at 2 Marlborough Street, Clitheroe. This was the address of his parents in the 1911 census – so I am confident that I have the right person.

lancashire-evening-post-18-january-1926

THE ROADSIDE DEATH AT WORSTON

The body found in the snow on the roadside at Worston on Saturday, has been identified as that of John Turner, cattle drover, aged about 50, who had been living as 2, Marlborough Street, Clitheroe. He left that address about seven o’clock on Saturday and was found at nine o’clock, it being thought that the severe cold had caused his collapse. The facts of the case were reported to the coroner, who considers an inquest unnecessary.

On this day … 31st May

1795 … John Dawson was born in Cowling, West Yorkshire to parents John Dawson and Ann Watson.  He is my 3rd great grand uncle.

1838 … John Dawson was born in Cowling, West Yorkshire to parents John Dawson and Elizabeth Benson.  He is my 1st cousin 4x removed.

1873 … Elizabeth Ann Turner was born in Kendal, Westmorland to parents Thomas Turner and Mary Jane Carradice.  She is my great grandmother.

On this day … 12th April

1873 … Jane Rooking died in Kendal, Westmoreland.  She was my 2x great grandmother

1874 … Ann Benson was born.  She was my 2nd cousin 2x removed.  Her parents were Charles Benson and Ann Smith

1893 … Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner were married at Settle Register Office in North Yorkshire.  They were my 1x great grandparents

1918 … Kathleen Musgrove was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire.  Her parents were Fred Ainsworth Stowell Musgrove and Florrie Musgrove.  She was my aunt

1933 … Ellen Musgrove (nee Stowell) died in Clitheroe, Lancashire.  Her parents were John Stowell and Ann Astin.  She was my great grandmother