Clitheroe Advertiser and Times

Wedding Wednesday – Norma Musgrove and Bernard Wearden

Norma Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Joseph Musgrove and Annie Simpson. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

Norma married Bernard Wearden at St James Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire, on 7 July 1954. The following notice was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times two days later.

WEARDEN—MUSGROVE

Mr Bernard Wearden, son of Mr and the late Mrs J Wearden, of 30 Thomas Street, Colne, and Miss Norma Musgrove, daughter of Mr and Mrs J Musgrove, of 58 West View, Clitheroe, were married at St James’s Church, Clitheroe, on Wednesday, by the Rector, the Rev A Lord. Mr G Hitchen, was the organist.

Given away by her father, the bride wore a gown of white silk net over taffeta, trimmed with orange blossom. Her full length embroidered veil was held in place by a wreath of orange blossom, and she carried a bouquet of pink carnations and pink roses.

The bridesmaid was Miss Edith Musgrove, sister of the bride, who wore pink and mauve silk net over pink taffeta, trimmed with lace. She had a pink feathered headdress and carried a bouquet of white carnations.

Mr Malcolm Frankland, friend of the bridegroom, was best man, and Mr Gordon Pinch, was groomsman.

After a reception at the Station Hotel, Mr and Mrs Wearden left for their honeymoon, the bride wearing a light-grey costume with pink and black accessories. They will reside at 9 Atkincoats Road, Colne.

Among the wedding gifts was a silver coffee service from the bride’s workfriends.

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Sports Centre Saturday – Lewis Coles

Lewis Coles is my 3rd cousin. He was born sometime in the fourth quarter of 1938 – his birth was registered at Darwen in Lancashire. Lewis is the second child of Lewis Charles Coles and Irene Fletcher. Our common ancestors are Harrison Musgrove and Jane Rooking – my 2x great grandparents.

In the 1939 Register Lewis’s parents are living at 9 Hollies Road, Blackburn, Lancashire. His father’s occupation is “schoolmaster”.

I know from the newspaper article below that Lewis attended Clitheroe Royal Grammar School, where his father was an English master. It seems that Lewis was a bit of a star at athletics and was awarded the Victor Ludorum Cup in 1955.

This is an extract from the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of Friday 15 July 1955. – taken from the British Newspaper Archives website.

Lewis Coles - Clitheroe Advertiser and Times 15 July 1955.png

Master’s Son Is Grammar School Victor Ludorum

Sixteen-year-old Lewis Coles, of Hollies Road, Wilpshire, son of Mr L C Coles, English master at Clitheroe Royal Grammar School, became this year’s Victor Ludorum at the school’s annual sports at High Moor, on Tuesday.
Coles, who had 11 points, was presented with the Victor Ludorum Cup by a former physical training master at the school, Mr D W Spencer.
He had earlier set up two new school records running 100 yards in 10.6 seconds, and 220 yards in 24.6 seconds.

The following year Lewis was runner up to Colin David Ford – only one point separated them.

If I say so myself I was also pretty nippy as a runner at school and won both the 100 and 220 yards races for my “house”. I also represented the school at West Leeds Schools athletic events. Now I’m lucky if I can manage to run a bath!!

Running Certificate

Wedding Wednesday – Edith May Musgrove and Malcolm Graham Frankland

Edith May Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Joseph Musgrove and Annie Simpson. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

Edith May married Malcolm Graham Frankland at St James Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire on 17 September 1955. Details of the wedding were announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 23 September 1955.

Frankland-Musgrove Wedding.png

FRANKLAND – MUSGROVE

Miss Edith May Musgrove, younger daughter of Mr and Mrs J Musgrove, of 58 West View, Clitheroe, was married at St James’s Church, Clitheroe, on Saturday, to Mr Malcolm Graham Frankland, only son of Mr and Mrs W Frankland, of Victoria Avenue, Chatburn.

Given away by her father, the bride was attired in a gown of white silk net over taffeta, trimmed with orange blossom, with a full-length veil surmounted with a wreath of orange blossom. She carried a bouquet of pink roses and white carnations.

She was attended by her sister, Mrs Norma Wearden, who wore a dress of blue net trimmed with white net and pearls. Her bouquet was of mixed sweet peas.

The best man was Mr M Nixon, a friend of the bridegroom, and the groomsmen were Mr B Wearden, brother-in-law of the bride, and Mr D Frankland, a friend of the groom.

During the ceremony, which was conducted by the Rector, the Rev J S Parry, the hymns “Lead us, Heavenly Father” and “The Voice that breath’d o’er Eden” were sung. Mr G Hitchen was organist.

A reception was held at the Station Hotel, Clitheroe, after which the couple left for a honeymoon in Blackpool, the bride wearing a lemon coloured dress and tweed coat, with tan accessories. They will reside at 58 West View, Clitheroe.

Among the numerous wedding gifts were a fruit set and wineglasses from workfriends of the bride at Stonebridge Mill, Chatburn, and a clock and towels from companions of the bridegroom in the 4th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment, TA.

Wedding Wednesday – Albert Kent and Hazel Musgrove

Hazel Musgrove is my aunty – her parents are Fred Ainsworth Stowell Musgrove and Florrie Musgrove.

Hazel was born on 31 January 1925 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

On 5 April 1947 Hazel married Albert Kent at St James Church, Clitheroe. The wedding was announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 11 April 1947.

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Kent - Musgrove 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KENT – MUSGROVE

On Saturday, at St James’s Church, the Rector (Rev Alexander Lord) solemnised the wedding of Mr Albert Kent, only son of Mr and Mrs R Kent, of 10 Brook Street, and Miss Hazel Musgrove, second daughter of Mr and Mrs F Musgrove, of 102 Whalley Road. Mr Ford was organist, and the hymns were “The Voice that breathed o’er Eden” and “Lead us, Heavenly Father.”

The bride, attired in a gown of heavy white satin with embroidered veil surmounted by a coronet of orange blossom and pearls, and carrying a bouquet of daffodils, was given away by her father. In attendance were Miss Nellie Hall (a friend) and Miss Mary Musgrove (sister). The former wore a blue taffeta dress trimmed with pink lace, with head-dress to tone. Her bouquet was of pink tulips. Miss Musgrove’s dress was of a heavy pink satin, with head-dress to tone, and she carried a Victorian posy.

The duties of best man and groomsman were carried out respectively by Mr Vincent O’Neill, the groom’s brother-in-law, and Master S Musgrove, brother of the bride. As the bride left the church she was presented with two silver horse-shoes by Master Robert Griffiths and Miss Patricia Lord.

The reception was held at The Craven Heifer Hotel, and later Mr and Mrs Kent left for their honeymoon at Charnford, Leicestershire. The bride travelled in a grey pinstriped costume and light coat with burgundy accessories.

The bridegroom gave the bride a handbag, his gifts to the bridesmaids being pearl ear-rings and a silver bracelet. The bride’s present to the bridegroom was a wristlet watch. Wedding gifts included an electric iron from No. 3 Shed, Westhead’s Mill, and an electric kettle, etc. from colleagues of the groom on the staff at Coplow.

Mr and Mrs Kent will reside at 95 Whalley Road, Clitheroe.

 

Sunday’s Obituary – Robert Halstead (1880-1957)

Robert Halstead is the husband of my grand aunt, Ellen Musgrove.

I have written about Robert and Ellen before – here – with a report celebrating their golden wedding anniversary in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 20 June 1952.

Robert passed away on 21 January 1957 and his obituary was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 25 January.

Robert Halstead - CAT 25 January 1957.png

Well known among the older generation of Clitheronians, Mr Robert Halstead, of 1 Curzon Street, Clitheroe, died at his home on Monday. He was 76.

Mr Halstead, who was born in the street in which he died, was a keen musician. He was pianist in the band led by the late Mr Joe Margerison and also entertained at concerts at Clitheroe Old People’s Club, of which he was a member. During the war he was organist at the Congregational Church.

He was also interested in football and bowling, and for some years was secretary of the Castle Park Veterans’ Bowling Club.

Mr Halstead, an overlooker until his retirement 10 years ago, ws associated with Moor Lane Methodist Church. He was chief ranger for the Ancient Order of Foresters, Court Royal Castle.

During the first World War he served as a Special Constable and was awarded a medal for long service.

Mr Halstead had not been well for some months, and sympathy is extended to his widow and daughter in their bereavement.

The Rev. J H Fenton officiated at the funeral at Clitheroe Cemetery yesterday.

Travel Tuesday – Annie Procter (nee Musgrove) – Australian Adventure

Annie Musgrove is my grand aunt. She was born on 26 March 1895 in Clitheroe, Lancashire, to parents Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell – my great grandparents.

Annie married Percy Procter in Clitheroe on 14 June 1919.

I have recently found the following the newspaper article in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 13 June 1956 in which they recount Annie’s recent extended stay in Australia….on doctors orders!!

Annie Procter - CAT 13 January 1956.png

BACK HOME AFTER 7 YEARS IN AUSTRALIA

A grand sunny climate, but….

“Follow the doctor’s advice” might well be the moral of this story of a rejuvenated 61-year-old Mrs Annie Procter, who recently arrived back in Clitheroe, after seven years in Australia.

It was in August, 1948, that Mrs Procter was advised by her doctor to go and live with her married daughter in Australia – for health reasons.

And so Mrs Procter set out on her first sea trip – a voyage across the world. And what a rough trip it turned out to be, too. But Mrs Procter enjoyed the buffetings of the ship in the rough waters of the Indian Ocean – much to the disgust of her less fortunate fellow passengers.

Her destination was Moorabbin, a suburb of Melbourne, where she lived with her daughter, Betty, now Mrs B Eastwood, and family. Mrs Procter spent five years at the seaside town of Parkdale, where the climate proved entirely to her liking.

In fact, the improvements in Mrs Procter’s health was so rapid, that six months after landing in Australia she started work in the mending department of a woollen mill at Bentleigh, near Moorabbin, and continued working without a break until coming back to this country.

BEHIND TIMES

Her general opinion of Australia? “Well behind the times,” says Mrs Procter. “They have a lot to learn, yet.”

Climate? – No complaints, naturally, in view of its recuperative powers.

Housing? – The drawback with new housing estates is that drainage and sewerage is not carried out until years after the completion of the building. Consequently, tenants are faced with ankle-deep mud covering the unmade roads after rain.

Litter? – Australians are definitely not litter-conscious.

Licensing laws? – Peculiar. The present hours, 9am to 6 pm are responsible for queer happenings.

Such as the occasion when a young couple, friends of Mrs Procter, went to a ball. In their car they took a zipped bag filled with bottles – a portable bar for use during the evening.

It is quite a common sight to see hotels besieged by workers (who finish at 5pm) and the same people emerging at 6pm carrying liquid refreshment to be enjoyed at home.

Cost of living? – The biggest drain on people’s wages out there is clothing and furnishings, which are exceedingly costly.

Mrs Procter, who is living with her sister and brother-in-law, Mr and Mrs Robert Halstead, at their grocery shop in Curzon Street, greatly enjoyed the voyage back to England – “an absolute contrast to the outward trip” – calling at various ports en route, including Naples where she visited the ruins of Pompeii.

Though she has decided to settle down for the time being in Clitheroe, Mrs procter still feels the urge to travel. And no wonder. “After the Australian trip, I feel 20 years younger,” she says.

An interesting personal reflection on life in Australia 50+ years ago.

Here is what Wikipedia has to say about Moorabbin in Australia now.

Wedding Wednesday – Ellen Musgrove and Robert Halstead

Ellen Musgrove is my grand aunt – in other words my grandad’s sister. Her parents are Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell, my great grandparents.

Ellen was born on 21 February 1881 in Clitheroe, Lancashire. Robert Halstead was born on 31 October 1880, also in Clitheroe.

Ellen and Robert were married on 21 Jun 1902.

On the occasion of their golden wedding anniversary in 1952 the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times published the following article on 20 June.

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Clitheroe Couple Married 50 Years

A quiet family celebration at home tomorrow will mark 50 years of married life for Mr and Mrs Robert Halstead, of 1 Curzon Street, Clitheroe.

Mr Halstead, who is 71, is well known to many Clitheronians. He was born in Curzon Street, next door to his present home, and has lived in the street all his life – except for seven years after his marriage, when he resided in Monk Street, just around the corner.

He has always taken an interest in music, and was organist at the Congregational Church, Clitheroe, for five years during the war. He was pianist at the Sunday meetings of the old P.S.A. in Clitheroe, and will be remembered my many as pianist in a dance band led by Mr Joe Margerison.

AT THE MILL

Mr Halstead, who, like his wife, worked at Foulsykes Mill for a number of years, had latterly been employed at Sun Street Mill, as an overlooked. He retired in 1947.

He is associated with Moor Lane Methodist Church, and is an enthusiastic member of the Castle Park Veterans’ Bowling Club, with whom he has played on several occasions.

His wife, Mrs Ellen Halstead, formerly Miss Musgrove, was employed as a weaver at Foulsykes Mill many years ago, and later ran the mixed business at their home.

Mr and Mrs Halstead, who were married at the old Baptist Chapel in Shaw Bridge by the Rev L J Shackleford, have one daughter and one grandchild.