Author: mike

Wedding Wednesday – Marjorie Fletcher and James Henry Edmondson

Marjorie Fletcher is my 2nd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Walter Fletcher and Jane Musgrove. Our common ancestors are Harrison Musgrove and Jane Rooking – my 2x great grandparents.

Marjorie was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire – her birth is registered in the June quarter of 1920.

On 29 May 1944 Marjorie married James Henry Edmondson at Low Moor Church, Clitheroe. A report of the ceremony was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 2 June 1944 (image taken from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Marjorie Fletcher & James Henry Edmondson - CAT 2 June 1944.png

EDMONDSON – FLETCHER

Low Moor Church was decorated with flowers gathered by scholars of Ribblesdale Senior School for the marriage, on Monday, of Miss Marjorie Fletcher, youngest daughter of Mr and Mrs W Fletcher, Chester Avenue, Clitheroe, and Mr James Henry Edmondson, eldest son of Mr and Mrs H Edmondson, Bolton-by-Bowland. The bride has been a member of the Ribblesdale School staff for several years, and the bridegroom was also a teacher at that School until a few months ago, when he received an appointment as headmaster at Barnoldswick.
Given away by her father, the bride was gowned in ivory satin and her tulle veil was surmounted by a wreath of orange blossom. She had a bouquet of pink roses. The matron of honour was Mrs J H Turner, sister of the bride, whose dress was of turquoise ninon, with headdress of flowers. Her bouquet was composed of roses. Mr Jack Wolfenden was best man, and the ushers were Mrs P Mitchell and Miss I Dugdale, cousins of the bride.
The ceremony was performed by the Vicar (Rev. I Pugh) and the organist was Mr Alan Crossley, cousin of the bride, who discoursed bridal music and played for the hymns, “The Voice that breathed o’er Eden” and “O Perfect Love.”
After the ceremony, a reception was held at the Pendle Hotel, Chatburn, and the honeymoon is being spent at Blackpool.
The bridegroom’s gift to the bride consisted of pearls, and he gave a silver bracelet to the bridesmaid, receiving gold cuff-links from the bride. Among the gifts was a cheque from members of the Royal Observer Corps, of which the bridegroom is a member; a cheque from Ribblesdale Senior School, scholars of which also sent presents and gave the bride a silver horse-shoe and a half sovereign as she left the Church.

Black Sheep Sunday – Joseph Lockington

Joseph Lockington is my wife’s great grand uncle – in other words a brother of her great grandmother, Susanna. His parents are John Lockington and Susannah Sowden – my wife’s 2x great grandparents.

Joseph was born in Tetney, Lincolnshire – his birth is registered in the June quarter of 1851.

By the time of the1881 census Joseph had moved to Middlesbrough in Yorkshire and was working as a labourer in the iron works. He married Ellen Elizabeth Johnson sometime in the June quarter of 1880 in Middlesbrough.

Unfortunately Joseph found himself in the local paper – the Daily Gazette for Middlesbrough on 21 November 1883 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Joseph Lockington - Daily Gazette for Middlesbrough 21 November 1883.png

CHARGE OF INDECENT ASSAULT AT MIDDLESBROUGH – Joseph Lockington, an iron worker, employed at Messrs Fox, Head, and Co.’s works, was brought up on remand before the Middlesbrough Magistrates this (Wednesday) morning on a charge of committing an indecent assault upon Mrs Martha Usher, the wife of a workman who is also employed at the same place as the accused. The statement of the complainant was that the accused went into her house in Disraeli Street and, in the absence of her husband, seized her round the waist, kissed her, and committed an indecent assault. When the case originally came before the Court Mr Teale, solicitor for the defence, asked for an adjournment till today (Wednesday), in order to call evidence to contradict the statement of the complainant. Several witnesses were now called; and, after hearing their version of the circumstances connected with the affair, the Stipendiary Magistrate (Mr C . J. Coleman) said the evidence was of such a conflicting character that he did not feel justified in convicting the accused. Case accordingly dismissed.

You would be forgiven for thinking there must have been “several witnesses” in the house at the time of the alleged assault – me too. The newspaper story is a bit flimsy when it comes to witness evidence – in fact there isn’t any detail at all to help the reader form an opinion.

As far as I can tell Joseph didn’t make the papers again.

Wedding Wednesday – Edna Fletcher and James Horace Turner

Edna Fletcher is my 2nd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Walter Fletcher and Jane Musgrove. Our common ancestors are Harrison Musgrove and Jane Rooking – my 2x great grandparents.

Edna was born on 19 June 1914 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

Edna’a first occupation after leaving high school was as a school teacher. She left home in Clitheroe and moved to Halifax, West Yorkshire. However the lure of home must have been strong because she applied for and was successful in getting a job at Gisburn School in Lancashire. The following brief report is from the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 6 November 1936.

Edna Fletcher - CAT 6 November 1936.png

Appointment Confirmed

Mr Douglas reported that the sub-committee appointed to deal with the vacancy on the Gisburn Council School staff interviewed the candidates, finally recommending the appointment of Miss Edna Fletcher, of Clitheroe, aged 22, who was transferring from Halifax. The meeting formally concurred.

In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2, Edna was living at home with her parents at Chester Avenue, Clitheroe. Her occupation is given as “Teacher elementary school”.

Just short of three years later Edna married James Horace Turner in July 1942. The Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 24 July 1942 carried an announcement of the wedding.

Edna Fletcher & James H Turner - CAT 24 July 1942.png

The wedding took place in Shropshire, on Tuesday week, of Pte. H Turner, youngest son of Mr and Mrs Frank Turner, 66 Pimlico Road, and Miss Edna Fletcher, second daughter of Mr and Mrs Walter Fletcher, Chester Avenue, Clitheroe. Pte. Turner, now serving with the Pioneer Corps, was formerly employed at the Albion Bobbin Works. His bride is a school teacher at Gisburn.

The Clitheroe Advertiser and Times then had another report on 9 October 1942.

Edna Fletcher - CAT 9 October 1942.png

GISBURN SCHOOL PRESENTATION – On Monday last, Miss Dorothy Bleazard, head girl, presented an electric fire to Mrs Turner (nee Miss Edna Fletcher) on behalf of the staff and scholars of Gisburn School on the occasion of her recent marriage.

James and Edna didn’t have any children.

They were married for almost 40 years before Edna passed away on 31 January 1982. James died in the year 2000, his death is registered in the fourth quarter of that year in Birkenhead, Cheshire.

Black Sheep Sunday – James Pearson Lonsdale (1909-1979)

James Pearson Lonsdale is my 4th cousin 1x removed. He was born on 28 March 1909 in Keighley, West Yorkshire. His parents are Thomas Lonsdale and Louisa Pearson. Our common ancestors are Isaac Kighley and Ellen Jackson – my 4x great grandparents.

Unfortunately James found himself in the newspapers two or three times at least.

The first time was in 1928, just a couple of weeks before his nineteenth birthday. On 12 March the Leeds Mercury reported the following story (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

James Pearson Lonsdale - Leeds Mercury 12 March 1928.png

FATAL COLLISION WITH TAXI

Fatal injuries were received at Addingham, on Saturday evening, by John William Hayton (28), of Woodgate Farm, Silsden Moor, as a result of colliding while riding a motor cycle with a taxicab, driven by James Pearson Lonsdale, 12 Gordon Street, Keighley.

The article does not suggest any blame was attached to James and I haven’t found any follow up articles.

By the time of the 1939 Register (taken at the outbreak of WW2) Thomas and Louisa Lonsdale and their children had moved from Keighley to Middlesex.

On 22 January 1944 the Middlesex Chronicle reported on a less serious offence (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

James Pearson Lonsdale - Middlesex Chronicle 22 January 1944.png

NO EXCUSE TO OFFER

James Pearson Lonsdale, 27, Lampton Road, Hounslow, was summoned at Spelthorne Petty Sessions, on Tuesday, for improperly using motor fuel at Church Square, Shepperton, on December 5th. He pleaded guilty.
P.C. Fleet stated that he saw a motor car being driven by defendant and stopped him. Questioned, Lonsdale said he was issued with petrol for journeys between his home and his work at Acton, adding that he had driven over from Hounslow to Shepperton and really had no excuse to offer. Told that the facts would be reported with a view to prosecution, he said: “Must you report it?” The distance between Shepperton and Hounslow was seven miles.
Defendant stated that he was called upon by the W.V.S. under the voluntary car pool system to collect a patient who had been suffering from flu. He acted on a telephone call and did not receive proper instructions for the journey.
Asked by the Chairman (County Alderman H. Fear) why he did not explain to the officer, defendant said he was too aghast at being stopped.
The Chairman: That’s nonsense.
P.C. Fleet said there was another man with Lonsdale, and they both left a hotel.
Defendant was find £2.

Petrol became the first commodity to be rationed in the UK after the start of WW2.

In July 1942, the Ministry for Homeland Security asked the Women’s Voluntary Service (WVS) to run the Volunteer Car Pool (VCP). By 1944, there were over 570 VCP schemes across Britain, involving transporting people to hospital as well as other duties. This evolved into the various services and now takes the form of Community Transport.

 

Wedding Wednesday -Herbert Dyson and Edna Doreen Feather

Edna Doreen Feather is my 4th cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Arthur Feather and Sarah Ethel Ambler. Our common ancestors are Anthony Mason and Mary Brayshaw – my 4x great grandparents.

Edna was born on 1 June 1906 in Keighley, West Yorkshire.

On 21 April 1931 Edna Married Herbert Dyson at Christ Church in Oakworth, Keighley. A report of the wedding was published in the Shipley Times and Express on Saturday 25 April 1931 (image taken from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Herbert Dyson & Edna Doreen Feather - Shipley Times and Express 25 April 1931.png

ECCLESHILL BRIDEGROOM

The wedding took place at Christ Church, Oakworth, on Tuesday afternoon, of Mr Herbert Dyson, youngest son of Mrs Margaret A Dyson, of Eccleshill, and formerly of the Worth Valley, and Miss Edna Doreen Feather, only daughter of Mr and Mrs A Feather, of Lidget, Oakworth. The ceremony was performed by the Rev Robert Tindall.
The bride, who was given away by her father, wore an ankle length gown of golden beige silk lace with a full skirt vandyked to a tight fitting bodice. Her hat was of lime green straw flecked with gold and her shoes of lime green satin. She carried a trailing sheaf of Madame Butterfly roses and asparagus ferns tied with a bow of pale pink ribbon.

Edna and Herbert had two sons. In the 1939 Register (taken at the outbreak of WW2) they were living at Crowther Avenue, Pudsey, West Yorkshire. Herbert’s occupation is given as “Editor”.

Herbert died on 27 December 1974 at the  age of 70. Edna passed away on 22 January 2007 – 100 years of age.

Sunday’s Obituary – William Riley (1860-1929)

William Riley is my 1st cousin 3x removed. His parents are John Riley and Ann Gawthrop. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley (my 3x great grandparents).

William was born in Colne, Lancashire sometime in the last quarter of 1860. He was the first child of John and Ann Riley and he had three younger sisters – Ann, Mary and Margaret.

In the 1861 census the family are living at Garth Holme, Colne.

William’s father, John, died in 1866 at the age of 26. So by the time of the next census in 1871 Ann was a widow with four young children. She was working as a worsted weaver. These would have been really difficult times for Ann and the children.

Not surprisingly, sometime in the June quarter of 1873 Ann married John Hodgson and they had three children. John, Ann and the seven children are together in the 1881 census at Belle Vue, Great & Little Marsden, Lancashire.

In the 1881 census William is listed as a warp dresser – an occupation he would keep until his death.

Just over three years later on the 6 November 1884 William married Ellen Fletcher at St John the Evangelist church Great Marsden. Over the next 16 years they had six children – but sadly two of the first three died in infancy.

At some point around the start of the 20th century William became active in the newly formed Labour Party. He was first elected as an unopposed candidate to Nelson Town Council on Tuesday 10 November 1903 – see report from the Burnley Gazette of 14 November 1903 below (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Riley - Burnley Gazette 14 Nov 1903.png

On Tuesday, another Labour candidate was given a walk-over at Nelson. The vacancy was in Central Ward, and was caused by the elevation of Councillor Reed to the Aldermanic Bench. It was thought that Mr. S. Davies (C), a former member of the Council, would have contested the ward, but, beaten before by the Labour element, he was evidently not inclined to come forward again. The unopposed candidate was Mr. William Riley, warp-dresser. There must be four or five warp-dressers on the Council now.

William remained active in the local community until his death on 11 August 1929.

The Burnley Express published the following obituary on Wednesday 14 August 1929 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Riley - Burnley Express 14 Aug 1929.png

NELSON ALDERMAN’S DEATH

A GREAT HOSPITAL ORGANSIER

By the death of Alderman William Riley, who died at his home, 93 Clayton Street, last Sunday night, Nelson has sustained the loss of one of its best public workers and a gentleman who had earned general respect. He will be long remembered as the first salaried organising secretary of the Reedyford Hospital, a position to which he was appointed in March, 1920, and his duties were to organise the raising of funds for the maintenance of the hospital, which came into vogue during the war, when most useful service was rendered to the wounded soldiers who were temporarily accommodated there. At the time of his appointment there were practically no funds available, and Alderman Riley at once initiated schemes with the object of raising money. He worked out a weekly voluntary contributory scheme for the mills and workshops, with the result that when he resigned early in September of last year, as the result of failing health, there were no fewer than 8000 contributors. The fact that the work people’s contributions were so well maintained during the long period of trade depression was a tribute to his persistent energy and resourcefulness. His position necessitated tact as well as dogged perseverance, but Alderman Riley succeeded admirably in surmounting all difficulties, and, on his resignation, he fully deserved the expression of gratitude for his lengthy and valuable service.

Alderman Riley, who was 68 years of age, had also had extensive service on the Nelson Town Council, of which he originally became a member in the Labour interest in 1903. After ten intervening years he was again elected as a representative of Southfield Ward, retaining his position as a councillor until 1927, when he was promoted to the Aldermanic Bench. As a public representative, he was ever a zealous and conscientious worker, and at the time of his death he was a member of the General Purposes, Finance, Gas, Water, and Baths, Watch, Parks, and Free Library, and Electricity, Light Railway, and Omnibuses Committees. 

He was formerly a warp dresser, and was a member of the committee of the Nelson and District Warp Dressers’ Association. He was connected with the Baptist cause at Carr Road Church, with which he had a long association.

I think that is a fitting tribute to someone who gave many years to public service.

Strictly Ballroom – Arthur & Mary Louisa Cambage

Mary Louisa Myers is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are Tom Myers and Mary Ellen Procter. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane – my 3x great grandparents.

Mary Louisa was born on 2 May 1899 in Burnley, Lancashire. Sometime in the September quarter of 1922 she married Arthur C Cambage in Burnley.

Now no one could ever accuse me of being able to dance – I have two left feet and no sense of rhythm or coordination whatsoever.

I’m very glad to say that was not the case for Arthur and Mary Cambage – in fact you could say they were the Fred and Ginger of their day in Britain.

According to the newspaper article below Arthur was “the outstanding personality in dancing, not only locally but in many parts of the country, for years”. Either by himself or with Mary he gave dancing demonstrations and was also in demand as a judge at both amateur and professional competitions.

In the 1939 Register Arthur and Mary lived at 19 Broadway, Fleetwood, Lancashire. Arthur was employed by Fleetwood Corporation as Entertainments Manager. Before moving to Fleetwood Arthur had been organising manager at the Nelson Entertainments Company.

The Nelson Leader of 24 January 1936 reported on Arthur and Mary’s impending move to Fleetwood.

Arthur Cambage - Nelson Leader 24 January 1936.png

LEAVING NELSON

MR A C CAMBAGE SECURES IMPORTANT POSITION

MANAGER AT FLEETWOOD’S NEW HALL

Scores of friends and literally thousands of people who know him by sight if not by name will be interested to know that Mr Arthur C Cambage, the organising manager for the Nelson Entertainments Company, Imperial Ballroom, is leaving Nelson shortly to take up the position of manager of the new Marine Hall and sun parlour and colonnades at Fleetwood.
Mr Cambage has been at the Imperial for the last six years, and for several years before was the manager of the Empress Ballroom, Burnley. Undoubtedly Mr Cambage has been the outstanding personality in dancing, not only locally but in many parts of the country, for years. He alone, or accompanied by his wife, has given demonstrations of dancing in London and other big cities, and at one time he was also in great demand as an adjudicator at both amateur and professional dancing competitions. Mr Cambage has also been well-known as a teacher of dancing, a profession which his father and mother were expert in for many years, and his departure from this district will bring an end to the Cambage family’s connection with local entertainments since 1902.
Mrs Arthur Cambage’s departure from the district will also be felt by many organisations in which she has been interested, and particularly the Burnley Garrick Club. She has played many leading roles for the club in productions privately and at the Victoria Theatre, Burnley, and about three years ago she was invited by Col. Robert Loraine to go to London to take part in his productions. Mrs Cambage has also appeared on the concert platform as a pianist, and her fame as a ballroom dancing expert is also well-known.
The position Mr Cambage has secured is regarded as one of the plums of the profession. The Marine Hall at Fleetwood was only opened in November last, and is one of the finest of its kind in the country, the ballroom being most modern and up-tp-date.
Mr and Mrs Cambage will take with them the good wishes of everyone who know them.

So as well as being an extremely accomplished dancer Mary Louisa played the piano and was a leading actress.

Arthur and Mary Louisa spent about eight years in Fleetwood before Arthur took over as manager of the Excel Hotel in Garstang, Lancashire.

Away from the world of entertainment Arthur served in the Army in WW1 for over three years, mostly in France and Belgium. During WW2 he joined the Home Guard in Fleetwood as a private in May 1940, eventually rising to Major and Commanding Officer in May 1944.

Arthur and Mary Louisa both died in 1966.