Author: mike

Joseph Frank Musgrove (1925-1987) – Cycle Accident

Joseph Frank Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. His parents are John Robert Turner Musgrove and Phoebe Scott. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner – my great grandparents.

Joseph was born on 2 November 1925 in Clitheroe, Lancashire. In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2, Joseph was living with his parents and brother at Hayhurst Street, Clitheroe.

In September 1941 Joseph was involved in a motor accident while riding his pedal cycle. Details of the accident were reported in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on Friday 19 September (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Joseph Frank Musgrove (1) - CAT 19 Sept 1941.png

An accident occurred on Friday, at the junction of Duck Street and Shaw Bridge Street, when a pedal cyclist, Joseph Frank Musgrove, a bobbin turner, residing at 32 Hayhurst Street, was knocked down by a motor car driven by John Brandwood, of 4 Rawley Street, Burnley. The unfortunate man’s left arm was fractured, or splintered. After receiving attention from Dr. Cooper he was taken home.

The case came to court on Thursday 25 September 1941 and the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times reported the outcome the next day.

Joseph Frank Musgrove (2) - CAT 26 Sept 1941.png

Collision Sequel

CONFLICT OF EVIDENCE: CASE DISMISSED.

“As there appears to be a conflict of evidence, we have decided to dismiss this case,” said Councillor French, presiding at the Borough Sessions, yesterday, when John Brandwood, a fitter, of 4 Rowley Street, Burnley, was summoned for driving without due care and attention and for failing to conform to a halt sign.
It was stated that defendant’s vehicle collided at the junction of Duck Street and Lowergate with a cycle ridden by Joseph Frank Musgrove (15), bobbin worker, of 32 Hayhurst Street, who was thrown from his machine, fracturing his left arm and bruising his leg.
Evidence was given by Mrs. Ida Gradwell, of Shaw Bridge House, and Thomas Ainsworth, of 44 Shaw Bridge Street, that defendant, who proceeded out of Duck Street, did not stop at the halt sign.
Defendant, who was represented by Mr. C. S. Corder, of Manchester, maintained that he did stop, but not at his usual place, because of the position of two other vehicles, and that Musgrove, who was riding at a fast speed, collided with his vehicle when it was travelling at only two miles an hour.
Corroborative evidence was given by John Wood, 31 Bank House Street, Burnley, and Eric Heyworth, 35 Myers Street, Burnley, who were passengers in defendant’s car.

Seems to me that Councillor French and others on the bench decided to take the easy option here.

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Wedding Wednesday – Dudley Greaves Harrison and Marguerite Thornton

Dudley Greaves Harrison is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. His parents are George Holroyd Harrison and Florence Shaw Hurtley. Our common ancestors are Thomas Hurtley and Hannah Braidley – my 3x great grandparents.

Dudley was born on 2 December 1903 in Leeds, West Yorkshire. He was baptised on 13 March 1904 at St. Michael’s Church, Headingley, Leeds.

Dudley Harrison and Marguerite Thornton

Dudley and Marguerite

On Thursday 16 June 1932 Dudley married Marguerite Thornton at Wetherby Parish Church, Yorkshire. Details of the wedding were announced in the Yorkshire Evening Post on the same day (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Dudley Harrison & Marguerite Thornton - YEP 16 June 1932.png

A WETHERBY BRIDE

Miss Marguerite Thornton and Mr. D. G. Harrison

The wedding took place today, at Wetherby Parish Church, of Mr. Dudley G. Harrison, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. George H. Harrison, of Rydal Bank, Roundhay, Leeds, and Miss Marguerite Thornton, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Thornton, of Brentwood, Wetherby (late of Dewsbury).
Miss Thornton is the lady captain of the Wetherby Golf Club, and Mr. Harrison is associated with the firm of George H. Harrison and Sons, colour printers, of Leeds and London.
The service was choral, and the Rev. G. T. Shettle, vicar of Hunsingore, officiated.
The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a close-fitting gown of cream satin, with an antique Limerick lace veil held in place by clusters of jessamine and myrtle, and carried Harrisii lilies.
Miss Doris Knowles and Miss Anne Himsworth (cousins of the bride), and Miss Dorothea Harrison and Miss Cynthia Harrison (sisters of the bridegroom), attended her in blue taffeta with net puff sleeves, and gold tissue caps, trimmed with rosebuds. They carried bouquets of roses.
There were two child attendants – Master Geoffrey George Russell Harrison and Miss Diana Cynthia Harrison, nephew and niece of the bridegroom. Mr. Leonard Harrison, of Newcastle, was the best man, supported by three groomsmen, Mr. Robert Thornton, Mr. Leslie E. Booth and Mr. A. Gordon McCandlish.
A reception was held at Brentwood, Wetherby, after which the couple left for a motoring tour in the South of England.

Black Sheep Sunday – Amos Clarkson

Amos Clarkson is the husband of my 5th cousin, Phyllis Wilson.

Phyllis was born on 23 March 1911 at Keighley, West Yorkshire. Her parents are Herbert Morris Wilson and Gerty Smith. Our common ancestors are Patrick Tattersall and Mary Gordon – my 4x great grandparents.

Amos was born on 23 March 1908 in Silsden, West Yorkshire.

On 22 April 1933 Amos and Phyllis married at the Parish Church in Silsden. At the time of their marriage Amos was a Police Constable and living at Taylor Street, Batley, West Yorkshire.

Unfortunately Amos found himself in trouble and in prison in 1947. The story was covered in the Daily Mirror on Friday 28 February 1947 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Amos Clarkson - Daily Mirror 28 February 1947.png

11-inch footprint clue puts P.C. in gaol for 3 years

A Policeman with footprints eleven inches long and a stride of twenty-eight inches, is to serve three years’ penal servitude.
He is Police-Constable Amos Clarkson, 38, of the West Riding Constabulary, who lives at Halifax Road, Hightown, Liversedge, Yorks, and sentence was passed on him at Leeds yesterday.
Footprints with diamond hallmarks, found inside the shop from which £25 10s. was stolen, coincided with Clarkson’s, it was stated.
Thirteen days after a robbery in a baker’s shop, police hid in it and were there when Clarkson entered. He ran away when taken in custody.

“I Lost My Head”
Clarkson told the Judge he was not near the shop on the night of the theft. “I lost my head.” he said, when asked why he ran away.
Passing sentence, the Judge said he was painfully conscious of the disaster the verdict meant to Clarkson and his wife and family, but it was impossible for him to take a lenient view.
Clarkson’s wife was carried screaming from the court.

Sunday’s Obituary – John Espley (1869-1945)

John Espley is my wife’s 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Joseph Booth Espley and Christiana Boyle. Their common ancestor is Martha Espley – my wife’s 2x great grandmother.

John was born on 5 May 1869 in Macclesfield, Cheshire.

In the 1891 census John was with his uncle & aunt Frederick Espley and Frances Espley in Biddulph, Staffordshire. He was working as an iron turner. By the time of the following census in 1901 John was living in Burnley, Lancashire working as a builders labourer.

On 7 December 1901 John married Sarah Booth at St Matthew the Apostle church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

Sarah was a young widow of 25. Her maiden name was Sarah Baines Turner. She had married Samuel Booth in the first quarter of 1897 in Burnley. Samuel died three years later. This left Sarah on her own with three children under three years old – Betty, Jane and Samuel.

By the time of the 1911 census John and Sarah had six children of their own but sadly two died in infancy. By now John was working in the water department of the Burnley Borough Council.

John was a conscientious employee for the water department and eventually retired from there in 1934. The Burnley Express of Saturday 5 May 1934 reported on his retirement (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

John Espley - Burnley Express 5 May 1934.png

THIRTY-THREE YEARS WITH WATER DEPARTMENT

After completing 33 years service with the Burnley Corporation Water Department, Mr. John Espley, of 14 Hawk Street, enters into a well-earned retirement today. Mr. Espley, who is 65 years of age, has served under three managers, and for over 20 years has been a foreman with the department.
He holds the proud record of never having been late for 32 years. One day, when he had been with the department about 12 months, he arrived five minutes late and was sent home for three days. He has never been late since! Mr. Espley is interested in gardening, with which he occupies much of his spare time.

John’s retirement lasted for eleven years before he died on 4 June 1945. He was buried three days later in Burnley cemetery.

The Burnley Express reported on his death on Saturday 9 June 1945.

John Espley - Burnley Express 9 June 1945.png

MR. JOHN ESPLEY

The death of Mr. John Espley (76) took place at his home, 81 Albert Street, Burnley, on Monday, after a short illness. Mr. Espley, a well-known Fulledge resident, was employed by the Burnley Corporation Water Department for about 33 years, being a foreman for about 20 years. He retired about 11 years ago. The funeral took place at the Burnley Cemetery on Thursday, preceded by a service in the Latter Day Saints’ Chapel, Rosegrove, with which he was connected. Elder John R. Moore and Elder W. Duckworth officiated. Arrangements: Mr. Joseph Harling, 29 Yorkshire Street.

Sarah lived for a further 13 months – she was buried on 29 July 1946 in Burnley Cemetery.

Workday Wednesday – George Robert Newman (1881-1977)

Eva Gawthrop is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are John Thomas Gawthrop and Annie Elizabeth Salisbury. Our common ancestors are John Gawthrop and Sarah Brown – my 4x great grandparents.

Eva was born on 9 May 1899 in Barrow in Furness, Lancashire.

In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2, Eva was living with her sister May Kirkby and family at Holker Street, Barrow in Furness. Eva was working as an “engine tracer (shipping)”. I had to look up the occupation to find out a bit more. The job involved tracing plans for the navy ships which were drawn up by the draughtsmen then photographed onto blueprints for building them. You had to be very accurate as you weren’t allowed to rub out any mistakes. You had a long period of training and supervision (a three year apprenticeship) and a great deal of practice before being allowed to work unsupervised.

Sometime in the March quarter of 1950 Eva married George Robert Newman in Barrow in Furness.

George Robert was a widower. He was born in 1881 and had married Nellie Key in 1908. They had one son, Leslie born in 1914. Nellie died at the age of 66 on18 January 1949.

So Eva and George Robert were a mature couple when they married. In fact George Robert had a long career as a Police officer in Hull, Yorkshire. At the time of his marriage to Eva her had been retired for almost 17 years. I found the following article in the Hull Daily Mail of Thursday 31 August 1933 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Hull Daily Mail - 31 Aug 1933.png

LEAVING HULL POLICE

Officer Who Served in Every Division

Today Hull bids an official farewell to one of its police chiefs, Superintendent George Robert Newman, who has been in the Force for nearly 29 years, and now retires on pension.
Mr Newman can lay claim to having served in each of the police divisions of the city at least once, and in some twice. Further, he has served under four Chief Constables: Major P. Malcolm, Mr George Morley, the late Captain Woods, and the present Chief Constable, Mr T. E. Howden.
Superintendent Newman joined the force in November, 1904, and after being at Wincolmlee station for about two years he was transferred to the Fire Brigade station. Here he remained for 14 years. In 1921 he was promoted to sergeant and transferred to the Central Division as a section sergeant.
In 1923 he again received promotion, this time to station sergeant, and took up duty at Norfolk Street station until 1925, when he was made an inspector and transferred to Wincolmlee. After a year he was again moved to the Central Station, remaining for two years.

IN CHARGE OF DIVISION
In 1928 he was raised to the rank of Chief Inspector, and was placed in charge of Crowle Street until 1929. He was then moved to Gordon Street, and placed in charge of the division. In the same year Mr Newman was appointed as Superintendent, and remained in charge of West Hull until his retirement.
Actually Superintendent Newman has served for 28 years and 9 months. During the past three years he has undertaken prosecutions for the police twice per week.
He is president of the International Police Association and the Police Temperance Society, while he is also interested in the Temporary Home for young people in Hull.
Mr Newman, who has earned the respect of everyone except lawbreakers, will remain in Hull after his retirement.

George Robert passed away at the age of 96 on 15 November 1977. Eva died 15 months later on 21 February 1979 at the age of 79.

Sunday’s Obituary – Alfred Chadwick (1871-1874)

Alfred Chadwick is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. His parents are Benjamin Towler Chadwick and Susannah Jane Lister. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff (my 4x great grandparents).

Alfred’s mother, Susannah, is my 1st cousin 4x removed. She was born in Burnley, Lancashire sometime in the March quarter of 1849 to parents Richard Lister and Jane Stowell.

In the 1861 census Susannah and her sister Mary Ellen were pupils at the Servants School in Casterton, near Kendal, Westmorland. Perhaps being trained for a life in service. That sort of life didn’t happen for Susannah, but I’m not sure the alternative was much better for her.

On 11 October 1868 Susannah married Benjamin Towler Chadwick at St James church, Burnley. As far as I can tell they had six children – but sadly four of them died in infancy, including Alfred.

The following article is from the Burnley Gazette of 2 January 1875 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Alfred Chadwick - Burnley Gazette 2 Jan 1875.png

A CHILD BURNED TO DEATH – An inquest was held at the Borough Hotel, Burnley, on Saturday morning, before Mr. H. U. Hargreaves, coroner, on the body of Alfred Chadwick, a boy aged 31/2 years, who died on Friday last from the effects of burns which he received on Wednesday the 23rd instant. — Susannah Jane Chadwick, wife of Benjamin Chadwick, of Piccadilly Road, said her husband was a lawyer’s clerk. The deceased was her son, and was burnt on Wednesday, the 23rd instant., about ten minutes to two o’clock. Witness had left the boy in the back kitchen, where she had lighted a fire for the use of a washerwoman, and had not been out of the place above a minute when she heard a scream; and on going to see what it was she found the boy lying on his face and his pinafore on fire. She had previously placed some clothes on a clothes “horse” in front of the fire, but they were not touched by the fire, and the boy had crept underneath. She wrapped a sheet around him immediately and put the fire out. The boy told her that his brother, who was in the kitchen with him, had given him a stick, and that he had gone underneath the “winter-hedge” and put it into the fire. The brother, who was a little older, told his mother that he did not notice the deceased to be on fire until he screamed, and then he called out to his mother. The elder brother denied having given deceased a stick. The deceased was burnt on the face, left arm, and knees, and his death occurred on Friday morning between seven and eight o’clock. — Dr. Smithwaite attended the deceased. —The jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was accidentally burned to death.

This must surely have been a terrible time for the whole family.

Susannah then died at the relatively young age of 41 on 23 May 1890 and I do wonder whether she ever got over the tragic death of Alfred.

Sunday’s Obituary – Dorothy Pickles (nee Hutchinson) 1864-1942

Dorothy Pickles (nee Hutchinson) is the wife of Frederick Pickles – my 2nd cousin 3x removed.

Frederick was born on 2 January 1863 in Cowling, West Yorkshire, to parents John Pickles and Elizabeth Dawson. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson (my 4x great grandparents).

Frederick Pickles and Dorothy Hutchinson married on 6 November 1886 at Holy Trinity church, Cowling. They had two children:-

Norman Edward – born 21 December 1891
Edith May – born 4 November 1895

In the 1911 census Dorothy was described as a “baker and confectioner”. She carried on this business for many years.

Frederick died on 3 August 1918 at the age of 55. He was buried at Holy Trinity, Cowling five days later.

Dorothy lived for a further 24 years until her death on 24 August 1942. She too was buried at Holy Trinity, on 27 August 1942.

The Barnoldswick and Earby Times reported Dorothy’s passing on Friday 28 August 1942 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Death of Mrs. Dorothy Pickles
Much regret has been expressed in the village at the death, which took place suddenly on Monday morning, of Mrs Dorothy Pickles, of Queen Street, Cowling. The deceased lady was 77 years of age, and she had carried on business as a baker and confectioner in Queen Street Dining Rooms for many years. On Monday morning she was following her usual business when she collapsed and died. She was a member of the well-known Cowling family of Hutchinson, who had occupied Fold Farm, Cowling, for many years. She was one of eleven children, and the eldest of seven daughters. Actively interested in the Methodist cause throughout her life, she was associated with the Walton Street Methodist Church. She was also an advocate of the Liberal cause and was a member of the Women’s Liberal Association. Her late husband, Mr. Fred Pickles, who died 24 years ago, was a well-known musician, being an organist and a pianist of some repute. The funeral took place yesterday and the Rev. S. P. Hadley conducted a service at the house and the Rev. E. Betenson performed the last rites at the Cowling Parish Church, where the interment took place. Mrs. Pickles is survived by one son and one daughter, these being Mr. Norman Pickles, of Sutton, and Mrs. Harry Dracup, of Keighley.

In her will Dorothy left effects totalling £1261 3s 2d to her son Norman Edward Pickles and to her daughter Edith May Dracup and her son-in-law Harry Dracup.