Author: mike

Sunday’s Obituary – Harrison Musgrove (1858-1911)

Harrison Musgrove is my great grand uncle.  His parents are Harrison Musgrove and Jane Rooking (my 2x great grandparents).

Harrison was born on 29 May 1858 in Kendal, Westmorland.  He remained in Kendal until sometime in the mid 1880’s.  On the 1871 census at the age of 12 his occupation is given as “tobacconist” and in 1881 he was working as a “farm servant indoors”.

Sometime in Q2 1883 Harrison married Jane Harrison in Kendal.  As far as I can tell Harrison and Jane had at least six children:-

Agnes Jane – 1881; Eliza – 1886; Alice – 1888; Elinor – 1892; Rachel – 1894; Elizabeth Ann – 1896

In the 1891 census the family were living near Horton in Ribblesdale and Harrison was working as a “general labourer”.  By 1901 they had moved to Holme, Lancashire and Harrison was now a “limestone quarryman”.

The family continued their regular travels and in 1911 they were living in Halifax, West Yorkshire.  Harrison was employed as a “quarryman”.

I have today found the following article from the Yorkshire Post & Leeds Intelligencer of 15 July 1911.

Harrison Musgrove 1911DEATHS FROM HEAT

A farm labourer, named Harrison Musgrove, aged 45 years, died from the effects of the intense heat on Thursday, at Burton-in-Lonsdale, four miles from Ingleton.  Dr Troughton was able to certify that death was due to heat apoplexy.  Musgrove hailed from Jubilee Street, Halifax, where his wife is now living.

This was the first time I had come across suggestions  that there was a heat wave in the summer of 1911.  I was able to find a report from The Independent newspaper from July 2006 with details about the Long, hot summer: The Great British heatwave of 1911

Harrison Musgrove ProbateHarrison left a will with effects of £5 going to his wife Jane.

 

Military Monday – Ernest J Jackson

Ernest J Jackson is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. He is the son of George Ernest Jackson and Elizabeth Ann Gawthrop. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley – my 3x great grandparents.

Ernest was born about 1897. He had and older brother and sister – Harry Jackson and Florence May Jackson. The family lived in the Padiham area of Lancashire.

Below is a newspaper cutting from the Burnley Express of 11 September 1915.

Ernest Jackson

YOUNG PADIHAM HERO

Mr and Mrs Jackson, of The Anchorage, East Beach, Lytham, had a postcard from their son, Sapper E Jackson, of the Royal Engineers, recently, to say hat he had been wounded in the shoulder by shrapnel, Sapper Jackson took part in the fighting around Hooge, and there it was that he was wounded. The same night that he was wounded he was taken to a dressing station away from the firing line, and subsequently reached the Canadian Hospital at Le Treporte. He is progressing favourably, though the wound is painful. Sapper Jackson pays a tribute to the nurses, who, he says, are kindness itself.

Sapper Jackson has been recommended for the D.C.M. for bravery in carrying his officer, who was wounded, out of danger, under a heavy fire. He is only 18 years of age. He was educated at Sedbergh School, and was a member of the Officers Training Corps there, but preferred going in the ranks to obtaining a commission. He is a son of Mr Jackson, who until two and a half years ago lived in Padiham as a cotton manufacturer, being also interested in the Sadden Printing Co. Sapper E Jackson is a nephew of the late Mr Charles Laycock, of Sabden, and grandson of the late Mr Israel Gawthrop, of Sabden.

His brother, Corpl. H Jackson, is serving in the County Palatine R.F.A., and Miss Jackson has gone for training as a nurse.

Thriller Thursday – Ernest Espley (1884-1956)

Ernest Espley is the brother of my wife’s grandfather.  He was born in 1884 in Biddulph, Staffordshire.  His parents were Frederick Espley and Frances Owen.

I have Ernest on the census returns for 1891 and 1901 in Biddulph.  In 1901 he was working as driver in a coal mine.

By 1911 Ernest had a complete change of career and location.  He was now employed as a Police Constable and living in the West Derby area of Liverpool.

1911 Census

1911 Census

A trawl through the newspaper archives on Find My Past produced the following article from the Manchester Courier on 26 August 1905.

Manchester Courier

Manchester Courier

All in a days work for a brave “bobby”.

Arthur Edward Espley & Emma Esther Espley – Census Mystery

Arthur Edward Espley is my wife’s 2nd cousin 2x removed. He was born on 22 Jul 1877 to parents Henry Espley and Ellen Hannah Clewley.

Arthur married Emma Esther Bowker on 3 January 1899 in Chorlton, Lancashire.

As far as I can tell Arthur and Emma had three children:-

Arthur Edward Espley – about March 1899
James Henry Espley – 2 February 1900
William Ernest Espley – 6 October 1901

It seems that things went badly for Arthur and Emma fairly quickly and there is a newspaper article in the Lichfield Mercury on 6 April 1900.

Lichfield Mercury

Lichfield Mercury

DOMESTIC DIFFERENCES

Arthur Edward Espley, Old Barracks, Birmingham Road, Lichfield, who did not appear, was summoned by his wife, Emma Espley, who complained of his cruel treatment and applied for a separation order. The complainant, whose face was discoloured, stated that her life with the defendant had been an unhappy one. He had frequently struck her, and on some occasions she had struck back. About a fortnight ago her husband struck her between the eyes, bumped her on the ground, and called her very bad names. She said that if she was what he called her he had better have the child, and she put the baby in his arms. Her husband went away a fortnight ago. She had no money and was afraid to live with her husband. P.C. Slack, who lives near the parties, also gave evidence, and the Bench made an order that the wife should have the custody of the two children, and that the defendant should pay her 8s a week.

I have not been able to trace any of the family on the 1901 census. Neither can I find Arthur Edward Espley (the husband) on the 1911 census.

However Emma is on the 1911 census under the name of Emma Minshall. She is living with William Minshall as his wife of 12 years. There are also five children:-

Arthur Minshall – age 12
William Minshall – age 10
James Minshall – age 8
Florrie Minshall – age 4
Emma Minshall – age 2

1911 Census

1911 Census

I believe the three boys are the children from Emma’s marriage to Arthur Edward Espley – although the ages of James and William are the opposite way around.

The only marriage for Emma to William Minshall took place in 1923 and is registered in Q3 in Stockport, Cheshire.

So it seems that if the 1911 census is to be believed then Emma and William started living together not long after Emma separated from Arthur Edward Espley.

At the moment I am still unable to find a death record for Arthur Edward Espley nor can I find an emigration or military record.

Emma E Minshall died in 1953 – registered in Q1 in Stockport, Cheshire – her age is given as 78.

If anyone can provide any information about this family please let me know!!!

Sunday’s Obituary – Ellen Hurtley (1858-1934)

My great grandmother Ellen Hurtley (nee Paley) died on this day in 1934 at the age of 75.

Ellen is one of my ancestors with missing information because I can’t find a registered birth for her. I know from census returns and from her death certificate that she was born about 1859. I have searched the GRO records both online and on microfiche at Leeds Library. I am fairly confident that there is no birth registered [UPDATED].  Well what do I know!!  One of my regular readers, Richard Thornton, has emailed me with details of a birth registered in Skipton Q3 1858 for Ellen Saley – I’ll be ordering the certificate today.

Ellen’s parents were James Paley and Mary Anne Spink. They had at least six other children and I have been able to find registered births for five of those children. The other missing birth is for Mary Paley.

Thankfully I made a breakthrough recently!!!

I discovered a baptism record for Ellen Paley and Mary Paley on 3 December 1858 at Conistone in the Yorkshire Dales. Ellen and Mary were twins.

Ellen & Mary Paley Baptism - Burnsall 1858

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have been able to find Ellen on all the census returns from 1861 to 1911. She was at home with her parents in 1861 and 1871. Then in 1881 she was working as a “domestic servant” at 4 Water Street, Skipton for Margaret Cooper (widow).

Ellen married James Hurtley on 5 February 1885 in the parish church at Rilstone, near Skipton. They were living in Flasby at the time of the 1891 census then in Silsden (1901) and finally Cononley in 1911.

James and Ellen had at least seven children:-

Rhoda – Abt December 1885
Jim – Abt March 1887
Jessie – Abt June 1889
Maggie – Abt March 1892
Nellie – 9 September 1894
Tom – Abt September 1897
Alice – 29 October 1900 (my grandmother)

It also seems that Ellen had a daughter before she married James Hurtley – Annie Paley (birth registered September1881). I haven’t yet obtained a birth certificate for Annie so haven’t been able to confirm whether or not a father is shown.

Ellen’s death certificate shows that she died at home – 58 Main Street, Cononley and that her daughter Jessie Brown was present at death.

Below is a photograph of Ellen Hurtley (nee Paley) and my grandmother Alice Dawson (nee Hurtley).

Ellen Hurtley & Alice Dawson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research Projects

I’ve neglected my blog for over 12 months and it’s now time to devote some attention with hopefully new inspiration.

My own family tree research has slowed down considerably to the point where I seem to be just chipping away at brick walls all the time. So over the last year I have been busy doing genealogy research for other people. I must admit I find that very interesting and satisfying. It can also be challenging at times especially when things do not go as expected.

I had two particularly interesting research projects.

The first involved tales of Scandinavian heritage – so my ultimate goal was to prove or disprove the family tales.

I was able to trace the origin of the British ancestral roots back to people in the 1861 census. This included the then head of the family with an occupation of Master Mariner and birth place of Gothenburg, Sweden. There were six children, three with a birth place listed as Russia and three born in Liverpool.

It was fairly easy to track the family right up to the 1911 census – although not without some difficulties. The problems were mainly around incorrect name transcriptions in the two main online indexes.

The family name was BRUNSTRUM. However the 1861 census had been indexed as BRUMSTRUM and the family name in the GRO marriage records for the father was BRAMSTOM.

The 1871 census was to be found under BRUNSTROM. There were two more children now – one birth was recorded as BRUNSTROM and one as BRUNSTMOM.

In the 1881 census the manuscript entry looks BRUNSTON but has been indexed as BRIMSTON.

In 1891 the census entry has been indexed as BRANSTROM.

There is a marriage in 1900 and the name now becomes BRUNSTON in the GRO record. Although the census entry the following year is under BRIMSTON.

Finally in 1911 the name is still BRUNSTON and it has been indexed as that.

The research had a bit of a sad end with a newspaper article reporting the death of the great grandfather of the person I was doing the research for and one of his sons in a tragic accident.

John Percy Brunston

John Percy Brunston

The second interesting project was very recently.

I did some research for someone in Australia who has an interest my wife’s family name of Espley. In particular she wanted to trace a death for her great grandmother. Should be straightforward right!!

I started by checking the BMD records and sure enough there was no death registered. I checked various spellings of the name all without success.

OK not a problem – maybe she had remarried. No, there was no marriage recorded.

Perhaps she had emigrated? I checked the available passenger lists online – no trace.

Winifred Frances EspleyI decided to check the newspaper archives on Find My Past. Breakthrough at last.

There were various newspaper articles in the Gloucestershire Echo about the person I was looking for – she was sent to prison in 1939 for two bigamous marriages.

This revelation came as a complete shock to the person I was doing the research for.

Both of these research projects provide valuable lessons.

First of all never completely trust the transcribed indexes – always double check with the original document images wherever possible.

Secondly the discovery of information while perhaps interesting as part of the research can sometimes be tragic and also shocking for the person getting the results.