Author: mike

Wedding Wednesday -Ernest Welch and Bertha Easton

Bertha Easton is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are Robert Fraser Easton and Christiana Astin. Our common ancestors are Robert Astin and Nancy Dyson – my 3x great grandparents.

Bertha was born on 25 August 1892 – her birth is registered in Burnley, Lancashire.

On 9 October 1922 Bertha married Ernest Welch at the Bethesda Congregational Church in Burnley. Details of the wedding were announced in the Burnley News on 14 October 1922 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Bertha Easton & Ernest Welch - Burnley News 14 October 1922.png

BURNLEY WEDDINGS

WELCH – EASTON

An interesting wedding took place at Bethesda Congregational Church on Monday last, the contracting parties being Mr Ernest Welch, only son of Mrs Welch, and the late Mr C Welch, of Waterloo Road, and Miss Bertha Easton, eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs R F Easton, of 16 Lansdowne Street. The ceremony was performed by the Rev J W Ffoulkes.
The bride was daintily attired in saxe-blue crepe de chine, and wore a pan velvet hat to match. She carried a bouquet of lilies and white chrysanthemums. She was attended by her sister, Miss Dorothy Easton, who carried a bouquet of white and bronze chrysanthemums. The bride’s brother, Mr Edward Easton, performed the duties of best man.
After the ceremony lunch was served at the home of the bride’s parents, and later the newly married couple left for Morecambe, where the honeymoon is being spent.

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Military Monday – Harry Pemberton (1884-1914)

Harry Pemberton is the husband of my 1st cousin 2x removed Marion Hurtley.

Marion was born in Keighley, West Yorkshire to parents John Hurtley and Elizabeth Moore. Our common ancestors are James Hurtley and Hannah Dinsdale – my 2x great grandparents.

Harry was born in Kirkstall, Leeds, West Yorkshire in 1884.

According to the military records available online Harry enlisted for service with the Prince of Wales Own (West Yorkshire) Regiment on 14 July 1902 – his service number was 6458. I assume that he was assigned to the army reserve at that time.

Harry and Marion married sometime in the June quarter of 1908. In the 1911 census they were living at 25 Backhouse Terrace, Kirkstall, Leeds.

Britain declared war on Germany on 4 August 1914. I’m not sure when Harry was mobilised to France – but I do know that within 12 weeks of war being declared he died of wounds on 23 October 1914.

According to the register of Soldiers’ Effects Harry had £3 8s 3d in his account at the time of his death. This was paid to Marion on 12 March 1915. Subsequently Marion received a War Gratuity of £5 from 5 June 1919.

Harry is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial in Belgium.

The following information and image is from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission(CWGC) website – http://www.cwgc.org

Ploegsteert Memorial

The PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL commemorates more than 11,000 servicemen of the United Kingdom and South African forces who died in this sector during the First World War and have no known grave. The memorial serves the area from the line Caestre-Dranoutre-Warneton to the north, to Haverskerque-Estaires-Fournes to the south, including the towns of Hazebrouck, Merville, Bailleul and Armentieres, the Forest of Nieppe, and Ploegsteert Wood. The original intention had been to erect the memorial in Lille. Most of those commemorated by the memorial did not die in major offensives, such as those which took place around Ypres to the north, or Loos to the south. Most were killed in the course of the day-to-day trench warfare which characterised this part of the line, or in small scale set engagements, usually carried out in support of the major attacks taking place elsewhere. It does not include the names of officers and men of Canadian or Indian regiments (they are found on the Memorials at Ypres, Vimy and Neuve-Chapelle) and those lost at the Battle of Aubers Ridge, 9 May 1915, who were involved in the Southern Pincer (the 1st, 2nd, Meerut and 47th Divisions – they are commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial). BERKS CEMETERY EXTENSION, in which the memorial stands, was begun in June 1916 and used continuously until September 1917. At the Armistice, the extension comprised Plot I only, but Plots II and III were added in 1930 when graves were brought in from Rosenberg Chateau Military Cemetery and Extension, about 1 Km to the north-west, when it was established that these sites could not be acquired in perpetuity. Rosenberg Chateau Military Cemetery was used by fighting units from November 1914 to August 1916. The extension was begun in May 1916 and used until March 1918. Together, the Rosenberg Chateau cemetery and extension were sometimes referred to as ‘Red Lodge’. Berks Cemetery Extension now contains 876 First World War burials. HYDE PARK CORNER (ROYAL BERKS) CEMETERY is separated from Berks Cemetery Extension by a road. It was begun in April 1915 by the 1st/4th Royal Berkshire Regiment and was used at intervals until November 1917. Hyde Park Corner was a road junction to the north of Ploegsteert Wood. Hill 63 was to the north-west and nearby were the ‘Catacombs’, deep shelters capable of holding two battalions, which were used from November 1916 onwards. The cemetery contains 83 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and four German war graves The cemetery, cemetery extension and memorial were designed by Harold Chalton Bradshaw, with sculpture by Gilbert Ledward. The memorial was unveiled by the Duke of Brabant on 7 June 1931.

Ploegsteert Memorial View 1.jpg

Black Sheep Sunday – Vera Dawson (nee Mills)

Raymond Dawson is my 1st cousin 1x removed. His parents are Harry Dawson and Leah Owen. Our common ancestors are James Dawson and Emma Buckley – my great grandparents.

Raymond was born on 15 November 1923 in Keighley, West Yorkshire.

Sometime in the September quarter of 1952 Raymond married Vera Mills in Nelson, Lancashire.

About six years later Raymond and Vera appeared in The Nelson Leader on Friday 19 September 1958 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Vera Dawson - Nelson Leader 19 September 1958.png

Man Struck by Car “Thrown in Air”

LEARNER DRIVER IS FINED AT NELSON

Because the pavement was overgrown and not fit to walk on at a point in Barkerhouse Road, Nelson, two couples were walking in the roadway at 10.40 p.m. on Saturday, June 28th. The two husbands were walking together and their wives were some distance behind.
Prosecuting at Nelson Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, Superintendent J.A. Lancaster alleged that the man on the outside, Ronald Howarth, a shop manager, of 137 Cleaver Street, Burnley, was struck from behind by a car, “thrown in the air,” and fell on the bonnet striking his head on the windscreen, which was shattered.
The learner driver of the car, Vera Dawson (35), of 2 Oak Villas, Edith Street, Nelson, was find £5 with £5 7s. 5d. costs and had her licence endorsed for driving without due care and attention. Pleading “not guilty,” Mrs. Dawson told the court that she thought she had passed the two men safely. Mr. Howarth suddenly seemed to turn into the car.
Mr. Howarth, who said he was walking close to the pavement on the outside of Mr. John K. Probert, of 246 Barkerhouse Road, Nelson, told how he was struck from behind. “The next thing I remember was picking myself up off the road,” he said. He was taken to Victoria Hospital at Burnley, where he received treatment for lacerations to the back of the head.
Mr. Probert, who also gave evidence, said it was impossible to walk on the pavement on the near side of the road, and that there was no pavement at all on the other side. He saw a bus approaching up the hill towards them, and then the first indication of anything behind them was “a bump – a crash.” Mr. Howarth was carried by the car from five to 10 yards and dropped into the gutter by the side of the road. The car carried on for quite a distance beyond the point where the accident occurred, probably 20 yards.
Both witnesses agreed with Mr. J. Parry (defending) that if they had been obeying the Highway Code they would not have been walking on that side of the road, but pointed out that there was no refuge at all on the opposite side.
Evidence was given by both wives. Mrs. Howarth said that the car had gone round them, but had not pulled out far enough to get round her husband. She could see there was going to be an accident and shouted, but her husband did not hear and he did not move at all.
Mrs. Probert said that Mr. Howarth seemed to be lifted up on the bonnet of the car. She did not hear the car’s horn sound, and saw no reason why the car should not have pulled out.
Inspector T. Lunn told the court that, facing in the direction of Nelson, the nearside footpath at that point was overgrown and that it was not possible to walk on it.
In a statement by the defendant, which was read in court, she said that because an oncoming bus was level with the men she could not swing out very far. As she passed, one of the men seemed to “step out” and she heard breaking glass.
She told the court that she thought she had passed the men safely, and had no recollection of bringing the car nearer the side of the road after passing the ladies. Asked why she had travelled so far after the accident, she said she thought she had touched the accelerator instead of the brake. She had been startled by shattering glass. Mrs. Dawson, who had been learning to drive for three weeks at that time, said she had only taken over control of the car a few yards before the accident, was only in second gear and travelling between five and 10 miles per hour.
A statement by her husband, Mr. Raymond Dawson, who was in the car with her, was also read. In it he said that as the car drew level with the men the outside one “appeared to turn out, pivoting towards us.” In court, he said he thought the car was safely past until the man appeared to half turn and hit the windscreen with his shoulder. He saw no reason to interfere with his wife’s driving until the accident had happened and she put her foot on the accelerator.
On behalf of his client, Mr. Parry submitted that the people walking in the road were not obeying all the rules laid down in the Highway Code and were apparently making no effort to see if there was any traffic coming behind them. He maintained that there was sufficient conflict of evidence to justify the case being dismissed.

 

Wedding Wednesday – Joseph Lynn Cuffley and Georgina Paley Aisbitt

Georgina Paley Aisbitt is my 2nd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Matthew Gullford Aisbitt and Rhoda Paley. Our common ancestors are James Paley and Mary Ann Spink – my 2x great grandparents.

Georgina was born on 24 August 1920 and her birth was registered in the East Ward district of Westmorland.

Sometime in the first quarter of 1944 Georgina married Joseph Lynn Cuffley and a report of the wedding was published in the Penrith Observer of 22 February (image taken from (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Cuffley & Aisbitt Wedding - Penrith Observer 22 February 1944.png

CUFFLEY – AISBITT, AT KIRKBY STEPHEN

The marriage took place at Kirkby Stephen, conducted by the Rev C F Cardale, of Mr Joseph Lynn Cuffley and Miss Geanie Aisbitt, only daughter of Mr and Mrs M Aisbitt, The Crescent, Kirkby Stephen.
The bride was given away by her father and wore a white satin beaute dress, with train, her veil being held in place by a spray of silk camelias. She wore white shoes and carried a bouquet of pink carnations with a “lucky” horseshoe. Miss Ethel Madden, who was her bridesmaid, was attired in a figured taffeta turquoise dress with short matching veil and gold shoes. Her bouquet was of tulips. Sergeant Conrad Maurar, Australian Air Force, was best man. Mr Donald Aisbitt (bride’s brother) was the usher.
After the reception in the Temperance Hall, Mr and Mrs Cuffley went to Morecambe for their honeymoon, the bride travelling in a blue wool marocain dress, blue camel hair coat with shoes and hat to tone. The bridegroom’s gift to the bridesmaid was a handbag.
The bridegroom has been in the Forces for 31/2 years as a despatch rider in the R.E. The bride attended Kirkby Stephen Grammar School. She studied for the teaching profession, which she intends to continue at St Hild’s College, Durham. For the past three years she has been on the staff of Havelock Junior School, Sunderland, from which she received a handsome mirror. The children of her own class combined to give her a brush and comb tray.

Sunday’s Obituary – Benjamin Lawrence (1904-1916)

Benjamin Lawrence is my wife’s 2nd cousin 1x removed. His parents are John Lawrence and Frances Maria Pritchard. The common link between them is William Darby and Maria Bingham – my wife’s 2x great grandparents.

Benjamin was born in Worcestershire in 1904 – he was baptised on Boxing Day 1904 at Lye, Worcestershire.

In the 1911 census the family had moved to Barnsley, South Yorkshire. Benjamin’s father, John, was a coal miner, so he presumably had to move there to get work.

John and Frances had lost two children while they were living in Worcestershire:-

John Leslie born in 1901 – died in 1904
Florrie May born in 1908 – died in 1909

Very sadly tragedy would strike again in 1916.

The following report is from the Sheffield Daily Telegraph of Monday 1st January 1917 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Benjamin Lawrence - Sheffield Daily Telegraph 1 January 1917.png

Benjamin Lawrence (12) left his home, 133 Barnsley Road, Stairfoot, on Saturday afternoon, and a little later was found drowned in a ditch by the side of Barnsley Road. He was lying face downwards in four or five inches of water, and artificial respiration proved of no avail.

It’s hard to imagine the effect all these deaths of their children would have had on John and Frances.

Wedding Wednesday – Mary Musgrove and Laurence O’Hagan

Mary Musgrove is my aunty. Her parents are Fred Ainsworth Stowell Musgrove and Florrie Musgrove – my maternal grandparents.

Mary married Laurence O’Hagan on 15 September 1956 in Clitheroe, Lancashire. The wedding was announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on Friday 21 September 1956 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

 

O’HAGAN – MUSGROVE

The wedding took place at SS. Michael and John’s Church, Clitheroe, on Saturday of Mr. Laurence O’Hagan, third son of Mr. and Mrs. P. O’Hagan, of 8 The Crescent, Clitheroe, and Miss Mary Musgrove, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. Musgrove, of 102 Whalley Road, Clitheroe.
The bride, given away by her father, wore a gown of white lace over tulle. Her bouquet was of white roses.
Mrs. Alice Dawson, sister of the bride, was matron of honour, and the Misses Lynn Dawson and Carol Musgrove, nieces of the bride, and Miss Patricia O’Hagan, niece of the bridegroom, were the bridesmaids.
Mrs. Dawson wore a gown of lemon-coloured net over taffeta and the bridesmaids dresses were of lemon-coloured organza over taffeta. They carried Victorian posies of mixed flowers.
Mr. P. O’Hagan, the bridegroom’s brother was best man, the bride’s brothers, Messrs. Harry and Tom Musgrove, sharing the duties of groomsman.
The Rev. Father F. Hannan, S.J., officiated at the ceremony and Mr. K. Sherliker was at the organ.
After a reception at the Station Hotel, Clitheroe, Mr. and Mrs. O’Hagan left for a honeymoon at Blackpool, the bride travelling in a tweed coat with tan accessories.
Mr. and Mrs. O’Hagan will reside at 1 Derby Street, Clitheroe.

 

Sunday’s Obituary – Jeffrey Jacques (1937-1950)

Jeffrey Jacques is my 5th cousin. His parents are Allan Jacques and Mary Elizabeth Williamson. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson – my 4x great grandparents.

Jeffrey was born in 1937 – his birth is registered at Skipton, Yorkshire in the third quarter. Sadly Jeffrey died with “tragic suddenness” on 7 December 1950 at the age of 13. The Barnoldswick & Earby Times reported his death on 15 December 1950 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Jeffrey Jacques - Barnoldswick & Earby Times 15 December 1950.png

Master Jeffrey Jacques

The death occurred with tragic suddenness on Thursday evening week, of Master Jeffrey Jacques, aged 13 years, younger son of Mr. and Mrs. Alan Jacques, of Cragside Farm, Cowling. The death took place at the Keighley Victoria Hospital, where Jeffrey had been admitted earlier in the day in a grave condition. Widespread sympathy has been felt and expressed with Mr. and Mrs. Jacques, and their elder son, Brian, in their sad bereavement. Jeffrey was a likeable lad, very cheerful, and of a sunny disposition. Very fond of outdoor life, he was happiest when out and about on the farm with his father. He was a scholar at the Keighley Boys Grammar School and at the Cowling Methodist Sunday School. At the funeral, which took place on Monday, a contingent of Jeffrey’s form-mates, with their Form Master, and accompanied by the Headmaster of the Keighley Boys Grammar School, Mr. Hind, were present at the Cowling Methodist Church. Services at the house and at the Cowling Methodist Church were conducted by the Rev. Joffre R. Smith, and among the many floral tributes was one from the Keighley Boys Grammar School, and one from the Cowling Methodist Sunday School. A memorial service will be held on Sunday morning at the Cowling Methodist Church.