Travel Tuesday

Travel Tuesday – Annie Procter (nee Musgrove) – Australian Adventure

Annie Musgrove is my grand aunt. She was born on 26 March 1895 in Clitheroe, Lancashire, to parents Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell – my great grandparents.

Annie married Percy Procter in Clitheroe on 14 June 1919.

I have recently found the following the newspaper article in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 13 June 1956 in which they recount Annie’s recent extended stay in Australia….on doctors orders!!

Annie Procter - CAT 13 January 1956.png

BACK HOME AFTER 7 YEARS IN AUSTRALIA

A grand sunny climate, but….

“Follow the doctor’s advice” might well be the moral of this story of a rejuvenated 61-year-old Mrs Annie Procter, who recently arrived back in Clitheroe, after seven years in Australia.

It was in August, 1948, that Mrs Procter was advised by her doctor to go and live with her married daughter in Australia – for health reasons.

And so Mrs Procter set out on her first sea trip – a voyage across the world. And what a rough trip it turned out to be, too. But Mrs Procter enjoyed the buffetings of the ship in the rough waters of the Indian Ocean – much to the disgust of her less fortunate fellow passengers.

Her destination was Moorabbin, a suburb of Melbourne, where she lived with her daughter, Betty, now Mrs B Eastwood, and family. Mrs Procter spent five years at the seaside town of Parkdale, where the climate proved entirely to her liking.

In fact, the improvements in Mrs Procter’s health was so rapid, that six months after landing in Australia she started work in the mending department of a woollen mill at Bentleigh, near Moorabbin, and continued working without a break until coming back to this country.

BEHIND TIMES

Her general opinion of Australia? “Well behind the times,” says Mrs Procter. “They have a lot to learn, yet.”

Climate? – No complaints, naturally, in view of its recuperative powers.

Housing? – The drawback with new housing estates is that drainage and sewerage is not carried out until years after the completion of the building. Consequently, tenants are faced with ankle-deep mud covering the unmade roads after rain.

Litter? – Australians are definitely not litter-conscious.

Licensing laws? – Peculiar. The present hours, 9am to 6 pm are responsible for queer happenings.

Such as the occasion when a young couple, friends of Mrs Procter, went to a ball. In their car they took a zipped bag filled with bottles – a portable bar for use during the evening.

It is quite a common sight to see hotels besieged by workers (who finish at 5pm) and the same people emerging at 6pm carrying liquid refreshment to be enjoyed at home.

Cost of living? – The biggest drain on people’s wages out there is clothing and furnishings, which are exceedingly costly.

Mrs Procter, who is living with her sister and brother-in-law, Mr and Mrs Robert Halstead, at their grocery shop in Curzon Street, greatly enjoyed the voyage back to England – “an absolute contrast to the outward trip” – calling at various ports en route, including Naples where she visited the ruins of Pompeii.

Though she has decided to settle down for the time being in Clitheroe, Mrs procter still feels the urge to travel. And no wonder. “After the Australian trip, I feel 20 years younger,” she says.

An interesting personal reflection on life in Australia 50+ years ago.

Here is what Wikipedia has to say about Moorabbin in Australia now.

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Travel Tuesday – Luther Espley (1915-1989)

Travel Tuesday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

Do you have images, quotes or stories about trips your ancestors or family took during their lives? Or have to ventured out on travels to your ancestral homeland as part of your genealogy research?

Luther Espley is my wife’s 2nd cousin 1x removed. He was born on 20 April 1915 in Burnley, Lancashire, to parents John Espley and Sarah Booth.

Luther married Edna Adelaide Currin in Burnley on 11 May 1940 and they had one son, John in 1945.

The family decided to emigrate to Los Angeles, California, in 1947 – following in the footsteps of Luther’s step-sister Jenny Booth.

Luther passed away on 11 January 1989, and Edna on 1 August 1993, both in Los Angeles.

I have just come across the following article from the Burnley Express of 8 March 1947 about their impending departure.

Burnley Express - 8 March 1947.pngGoing Where The Sun Will Shine

To seek sunshine, a better standard of living and better prospects for the future, Mr Luther Espley, his wife, Mrs Edna Espley, and their 19-months-old son, John, will leave England in three weeks’ time for California, where they will live near Los Angeles.

Mrs Espley and the baby leave this week-end for Liverpool, and the family will sail from Southampton in ss America on March 28th. In America they will join Mr Espley’s sister, who went to live there 22 years ago. Now Mrs Jeny Holden, she was well known in Burnley as a tailoress in Briercliffe Road, where she took a shop after having been employed at Primrose Bank Institution. In Burnley she will be remembered as Jenny Booth. Mrs Holden, who came to Burnley on a visit 10 years ago, is connected with the Lancashire Society of Los Angeles.

Mr Espley is at present employed in the Water Department testing office. He joined the department on leaving school. Being a local Territorial he was called up with the 52nd LAA Regiment, RA, on the outbreak of war, and served in France, being evacuated at Dunkirk. Later he served with the Eighth Army throughout the desert campaign, and was released from the Forces in December, 1945.

“During my travels,” he says, “I was attached to the American Fifth Army in Italy for a long time, and their descriptions of life in America fitted in with what I am looking for. We are going because we think living conditions are better there, and there will be better opportunities and prospects, especially for the youngster. And there’s plenty of sunshine all the year round.”

I have lots of admiration for Luther, Edna and John, especially for their adventurous spirit. I hope that they enjoyed their new life in California.