Sunday’s Obituary

Sunday’s Obituary – Frank Coulston (1945-1949)

Frank Coulston is my 4th cousin. His parents are George Edward Coulston and Janet Petty. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley – my 3x great grandparents.

Frank was born sometime in the fourth quarter of 1945 and his birth is registered at Nelson in Lancashire.

Sadly Frank had a very short life as the result of a tragic accident. The Barnoldswick & Earby Times of 26 August 1949 reported on the inquest held on Tuesday 23 August (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Frank Coulston - Barnoldswick & Earby Times 26 August 1949.png

Boy Drowned in Lodge

CORONER’S APPRECIATION OF RESCUE EFFORTS

“He was only after tadpoles,” said Mr John Ingham, a witness at the inquest held in Colne Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday on Frank Coulston aged three, of 8 Beech Street, Colne, who was drowned in Castle Hill Lodge on Saturday morning. The East Lancashire Deputy Coroner, Mr R H Rowland, returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”
Mrs Janet Coulston, the boy’s mother, stated that she was in Stafford at the time of the accident and had left the child in the care of his grand-mother.
John Stanford Hall, aged eight, of 9 Maple Street, Colne, told the Coroner that he and his brother were playing with Frank Coulston on the bank of the lodge. “Frank was walking backwards and fell into the water,” he said. Witness added that he ran into a nearby garden for help.
John Ingham, 14 Spruce Street, Colne, told the Coroner that he heard Hall saying “Frank is in the lodge.”
The Coroner: What did you do?
Mr Ingham: I told the boy to run and tell someone, and I dashed straight there. Frank was floating in the water some distance from the side.
The Coroner: You jumped in with your clothes on and got him out? – Yes.
Were you out of your depth? – It was shallow near the bank, but I was out of my depth when I got to him.
In answer to further questions, Mr Ingham said that he tried artificial respiration on the boy, with no success, and later Mr Dennis Quinland who is a qualified ambulance man took over and tried to revive Coulston.
Dennis Quinland, of 43 Lenches Road, stated that there was every appearance that the boy was dead when he saw him.

NOT REGARDED AS TRESPASSING
Police Constable George Mills gave evidence that he arrived soon after Mr Quinland had begun artificial respiration. He said that the lodge was about a quarter of a mile from the boy’s home, and that it was easy to gain access to the water. Quite a number of children played near the lodge, and that was not regarded as trespassing.
Summing up, the Coroner said he was satisfied that the boy fell into the water accidentally, perhaps losing his balance when he was walking backwards. “There is no question of skylarking or of the action of any other person,” he added. “I would like to place on record my appreciation of Mr Ingham’s effort in jumping into the water fully clothed when he was clearly out of his depth. Everyone who has been connected with this accident has acted most creditably.” The Coroner commended John Hall for the way in which he had given evidence, and also mentioned a third person, Mr John Burnett, of 30 Regent Street, Nelson, who had tried to resuscitate the boy.
After the inquest Mrs Coulston asked the Coroner if the lodge could be made safe. The Coroner replied that he was not concerned with that aspect.
Mrs Coulston: Well, who is? Surely something can be done.
The Coroner: I have every sympathy with you, but after all it is your child and he was a quarter of a mile away from home.
Mr T S M Badgery on behalf of the owners of the lodge, also expressed his sympathy, saying that children occasionally got into mischief, often with tragic results.

In December 1949 John Ingham received the Royal Humane Society’s Honorary Testimonial for attempting to save Frank.

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Sunday’s Obituary – Daniel John Burns (1897-1928)

Daniel John Burns is my wife’s 2nd cousin 1x removed. His birth is registered in the first quarter of 1897 in Glamorganshire, Wales. Daniel’s parents are Thomas Burns and Lucy Skelding. The family connection between Daniel and my wife is from William Skelding and Catherine Taylor – my wife’s 2x great grandparents.

Daniel appears in the 1901 and 1911 census returns in Llanbradach, Glamorganshire. He was the last of nine children born to Thomas and Lucy.

In 1911 at the age of 13 Daniel’s occupation as given in the census is “coal miner hewer”.

When WW1 started Daniel enlisted for service at Caerphilly on 11 December 1915. He was initially assigned to the Army Reserve with the 17th Lancers.

On 26 April 1918 Daniel had another medical examination and was subsequently transferred to the Tank Corps with a regimental service number of 313324 on 10 September 1918.

After the end of hostilities Daniel was transferred to Class Z Army Reserve on 16 January 1919. The Class Z Reserve was authorised by an Army Order of 3 December 1918. There were fears that Germany would not accept the terms of any peace treaty, and therefore the British Government decided it would be wise to be able to quickly recall trained men in the eventuality of the resumption of hostilities. Soldiers who were being demobilised, particularly those who had agreed to serve “for the duration”, were at first posted to Class Z. They returned to civilian life but with an obligation to return if called upon. The Z Reserve was abolished on 31 March 1920.

Within nine years Daniel would be dead.

As far as I can tell Daniel returned to the coal mines after the war. Sadly though, it appears he started to suffer with mental health issues and was admitted to the Angleton Asylum in Bridgend, Wales around May 1927.

The following article is from the Western Mail on 12 October 1928.

Daniel John Burns - Western Mail 12 October 1928.png

BRIDGEND PATIENTS ACT

The practice of allowing certain patients to be on parole without attendants was defended by Dr. McGregor, assistant medical officer at the Glamorgan County Medical Hospital, Bridgend, at the inquest at Bridgend on Thursday on Daniel John Burns (31), assistant haulier, Llanbradach, who threw himself under an omnibus.

Dr. McGregor explained that patients were only allowed to go out in this way when the medical staff were satisfied that their recovery was practically complete.

The Coroner said no criticism could be levelled at the institution.

The jury returned a verdict of “Suicide during temporary insanity” and exonerated the driver from blame.

Some of the other headlines reporting the events were not quite as moderate. For example the 

Belfast Telegraph said: LUNATIC JUMPS UNDER OMNIBUS

Northern Whig (County Antrim, Northern Ireland) said: LUNATIC JUMPS UNDER BUS

Hull Daily Mail  said: MENTAL PATIENT’S FATAL WALK

I’m left wondering whether it was the impact of war that caused Daniel’s ill health – probably something that wasn’t acknowledged then.

Sunday’s Obituary – George Dacre Crewdson (1890-1943)

Clara Shackleton is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are James Shackleton and Mary Elizabeth Haworth. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane – my 3x great grandparents.

Clara was born on 20 April 1900 and her birth was registered in Burnley, Lancashire.

On 30 August 1922 Clara married George Dacre Crewdson at Holy Trinity Church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

George was born on 8 June 1890 – his birth was also registered in Burnley.

When the 1939 Register was taken on 29 September 1939 George and Clara were living at 7 Church Street, Briercliffe, Burnley. George was employed as a “cotton loom overlooker” and Clara’s occupation was described as “unpaid domestic duties”. Also living with them were two children – Eveline and James. Their first daughter, Irene, was born in 1923 but sadly died the same year.

Within three and half years Clara would be left a widow with two children following the death of George at the age of 52.

The Nelson Leader of 29 January 1943 reported on George’s death as a result of what at first appears to be an innocuous incident at work.

George Daker Crewdson - Nelson Leader 29 January 1943.png

Fatal Pin-prick

OVERLOOKER’S DEATH FROM SEPTICAEMIA

A pin-prick sustained while handling pickers at Primrose Mill, Harle Syke, was held responsible for the death of George Dacre Crewdson (51), 7 Church Street, Briercliffe, a power loom overlooker employed by the South View Manufacturing Company, when the East Lancashire Coroner (Mr F Rowland) conducted an inquest at Brierfield Town Hall on Wednesday morning.
The widow was represented by Mr Riley; Mr Howarth appeared on behalf of the employers, and Miss Blackburn, H M Inspector of Factories, was also present.
The widow, Mrs Clara Crewdson, said her husband was a healthy man and never had a serious illness. During the evening of Friday January 8th, he complained that the first finger on his right hand was sore, and said he had got something in it at his work, but he did not say when. He explained that he was putting some pickers on and caught his finger on one of these, but whether it was a piece of hide or not which had entered the finger he did not know. Whatever it was, it had burnt in owing to the picker being hot. He bathed the finger in hot water and applied a poultice, but despite further treatment, the infection became worse. He followed his employment until 5.30pm on Wednesday, January 13th, and on the 15th consulted Dr Lamberti, who treated the injury and ordered her husband to go to Victoria Hospital the following day. He paid two visits to the hospital, and ought to have gone there again on the 18th, but he was too ill to do so. Dr Lamberti, and later Dr Munroe, visited him frequently, and on the 21st a surgeon was called in. Despite this attention, however, her husband died last Saturday.
Sam Riley, another overlooker employed at Primrose Mill, said he was in the storeroom during the afternoon of January 11th, and in the course of a conversation Crewdson said he had injured the first finger of his right hand, at the same time holding up the bandaged finger, which was afterwards seen by other employees.
Dr Lamberti said the finger was septic when Crewdson first consulted him on January 15th. It was incised at the hospital, but the man’s condition grew worse, and his death on the 23rd was the result of septicaemia. Witness added that when he first examined the finger he found a small pin-prick between the first and second joints.
Witness agreed with Mr Riley that this could have been caused by a splinter which entered the finger as the man’s hand slid over the picker.
Dr Palin, Police Surgeon for the Brierfield district, said the post-mortem examination revealed the cause of death to be septic pneumonia due to infection from the finger. As the finger was very swollen the point of entry had passed away.
Witness agreed with Mr Riley that the medical history from January 8th onwards was consistent with the man having met with such an injury.
The Coroner said there had been great doubt as to the continuity between the alleged injury and the man’s death, but that had now been cleared away. He was quite satisfied that Crewdson did injure his finger in the way he had said at his work. Evidently it was just a pin-prick, and the man probably did not think at first that it was serious; nevertheless, he and his wife applied the necessary treatment from the outset. The man, being a conscientious workman, continued to follow his employment until he consulted the doctor on the 15th, but by that time septicaemia had got hold, and this caused his death. There was a chain of cause and effect between the injury and the man’s death, therefore the proper verdict was one of “Accidental death”. The Coroner said he did not doubt that the injury was caused while the man was following his employment, and deeply sympathised with the widow.
Mr Howarth expressed the regret of the employers, who recognised that they had lost a conscientious workman, and Mr Riley suitably replied on behalf of the widow.

Clara remarried to Smith Bannister sometime in the fourth quarter of 1946. She passed away in 1966 in Blackpool, Lancashire.

Sunday’s Obituary – Margaret Stowell (1864-1868)

Margaret Stowell is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. her parents are Thomas Stowell and Ann Wroe. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff – my 4x great grandparents.

Margaret was born sometime in the first quarter of 1864 in Burnley, Lancashire. She was the first of at least ten children. Margaret was baptised on 25 March 1864 at St. Paul’s church in Burnley.

Very sadly Margaret only had a short life.

The Burnley Gazette of Saturday 15 August 1868 carried the following story.

Margaret Stowell - Burnley Gazette 15 august 1868.png

SHOCKING ACCIDENT – On Monday a little girl four years of age, named Margaret Stowell, and who resided at Lanshaw Bridge, came to a sad end by being run over with a cart, the wheel passing over her head, and killing her instantaneously. The inquest was held on Wednesday at the Emmett Arms before H U Hargreaves, Esq., coroner, when the jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”

Sunday’s Obituary – Thomas Wilson Critchlow (1895-1945)

Lucy Ellen Burt is my wife’s 4th cousin 1x removed – so not very close then. Her parents are Robert Duncan Burt and Mary Elizabeth Hollins. Lucy and my wife’s common ancestor is John Aspley – my wife’s 4x great grandfather.

Sometime in the third quarter of 1919 Lucy married Thomas Wilson Critchlow – the marriage is registered at Stone in Staffordshire.

In the 1939 Register Thomas and Lucy are living at 111 Wilson Road, Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire. Thomas is working as a grocery store manager.

On Thursday 20 September 1945 Thomas went to a football match and didn’t return home. He went to Stoke City’s Victoria Ground to watch Stoke City and Manchester United.

The Birmingham Daily Gazette of 21 September 1945 published the following brief account.

Thomas Critchlow - Birmingham Daily Gazette 21 September 1945.png

Two Spectators Die at Football Match

Sitting within a few yards of each other in one of the stands at the match between Stoke City and Manchester United last evening two elderly men collapsed and died within a few minutes of each other. They were Thomas Critchlow of Wilson Road, Hanford, Stoke, and Percy Legge, of Blackfriars Road, Newcastle-under-Lyme.

In his will Thomas left effects totalling £2611 12s 1d to Lucy Ellen Critchlow (widow) and Frederick John Davison (rubber factory foreman).

The final score in the match in case you were wondering was Stoke City 1 v Manchester United 2.

In 1939 at the outbreak of WW2 the Football League was cancelled. In its place were formed War Leagues and cups, based on geographical lines rather than based on previous league placement. However, none of these were considered to be competitive football, and thus their records are not recognised by the Football League and thus not included in official records.

In the 1945/46 season, when Thomas died at the match, Stoke City ended the season in 13th place in Football League North with 42 points. Manchester United finished in 4th place with 49 points. League winners were Sheffield United with 60 points and bottom of the league in 22nd place was……Leeds United with 25 points.

Sadly Thomas Critchlow and Percy Legge were not the only people to die at a Stoke City match in the 1945/46 season.

On 9 March 1946 Stoke City were playing Bolton Wanderers in the Sixth Round of the FA Cup at Burnden Park, Bolton, Lancashire.

The Burnden Park disaster was a human crush which resulted in the deaths of 33 people and injuries to hundreds of Bolton fans. It was the deadliest stadium related disaster in British history until the Ibrox Park disaster in 1971.

Sunday’s Obituary – Robert Halstead (1880-1957)

Robert Halstead is the husband of my grand aunt, Ellen Musgrove.

I have written about Robert and Ellen before – here – with a report celebrating their golden wedding anniversary in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 20 June 1952.

Robert passed away on 21 January 1957 and his obituary was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 25 January.

Robert Halstead - CAT 25 January 1957.png

Well known among the older generation of Clitheronians, Mr Robert Halstead, of 1 Curzon Street, Clitheroe, died at his home on Monday. He was 76.

Mr Halstead, who was born in the street in which he died, was a keen musician. He was pianist in the band led by the late Mr Joe Margerison and also entertained at concerts at Clitheroe Old People’s Club, of which he was a member. During the war he was organist at the Congregational Church.

He was also interested in football and bowling, and for some years was secretary of the Castle Park Veterans’ Bowling Club.

Mr Halstead, an overlooker until his retirement 10 years ago, ws associated with Moor Lane Methodist Church. He was chief ranger for the Ancient Order of Foresters, Court Royal Castle.

During the first World War he served as a Special Constable and was awarded a medal for long service.

Mr Halstead had not been well for some months, and sympathy is extended to his widow and daughter in their bereavement.

The Rev. J H Fenton officiated at the funeral at Clitheroe Cemetery yesterday.

Sunday’s Obituary – Susannah Musgrove (1856-1869)

Susannah Musgrove is my great grand aunt – a sister of my great grandfather Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove.

Susannah was born on 2 August 1856 at Over Darwen, Lancashire. She was the first of five children born to my 2x great grandparents John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth.

I had known for a long time that Susannah died young at the age of 12. However I have only just found a newspaper article with details of the circumstances of her death. This report is from the Preston Herald of 6 February 1869.

Susannah Musgrove - Preston Herald 6 February 1869.png

A GIRL KILLED AT THE BELGRAVE PAPER STAINING WORKS

On Monday afternoon a fatal accident happened to a girl named Susannah Musgrove, aged 12 years, daughter of Mr John Musgrove, who was employed as a short time tearer in connection with the block printing department. It appears that she had been to school on Monday afternoon, and on returning called at the print shop to see if her master was there, and was seen playing about in the room on the second floor. About 5.40pm a man named Joseph Riding had occasion to use the hoist, which is in one corner of the room, and used for the purpose of raising goods from one room to another. As the hoist did not descend lower than the second floor, the man Riding went to see what was the cause. On getting there he found the deceased laid down on her belly on the floor, with her head underneath the hoist. The hoist was at once raised, but the unfortunate girl was dead. She must have been in the act of looking down the hoist way into the lower room, and therefore could not see the hoist when descending. An inquest will be held on the body.

You know sometimes you just wonder how much tragedy one family can have.

Susannah’s grandfather, Joseph Musgrove (my 3x great grandfather) died in 1858 as the result of a fall at home when he dislocated his neck. I blogged about this here.

John Musgrove, Susannah’s father, committed suicide in 1884 – see blog post here.

Of the five children that were born to John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth only two survived to adulthood – Thomas and Joseph.

Susannah died as the result of the accident. Her brother George died on the day he was born 20 August 1857. And another brother, James, died at three months old in 1868.

So sad.