Sunday’s Obituary

Sunday’s Obituary – Phyllis Emma Paley (1916-1922)

Phyllis Emma Paley is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are John Robert Paley and Beatrice Bailes. Our common ancestors are William Paley and Mary Blackey, my 3x great grandparents.

Phyllis was born in Leeds, West Yorkshire, her birth being registered in the September quarter of 1916 under her mother’s name of Bailes.

I found the following article in the Dundee Evening Telegraph of 19 July 1922.

Phyllis Emma Paley - Dundee Evening Telegraph 19 July 1922.png

DROWNED IN SEWAGE TANK

Council’s Insufficient Safeguards for Children

Phyllis Emma Paley (5), Wigton, near Leeds, went into the field to gather flowers. Two hours later she was found dead at the bottom of a sewage tank, the property of Wetherby Urban District Council.

At the inquest Mrs Beatrice Paley, the mother, said the child left the house about 8.30, and when she did not return by ten o’clock witness went to look for her. The door in the boarding that surrounded the tank was open. By means of a fork, John Paley brought up the body from the bottom of the tank.

Paley said that he had been cutting grass round the tank on the same evening, and noticed that the door was open. He shut it and held it fast with a stone used for the purpose. There was also a bolt, but it did not fasten properly. The child had been with him on previous occasions when he was working near the tank, and he had told her not to go near it.

Dr Tempest said the child could easily have removed the stone that held the door. Death was due to suffocation, caused by drowning.

The Coroner, in returning a verdict of “Death by misadventure,” said that though he would say nothing about the legal position of the Wetherby Council, it seemed to him quite clear that sufficient precautions had not been taken to prevent children from going, out of curiosity, inside the enclosure. “It is no use saying the children ought not to go inside these places, because we all know that they will do so.”

I did wonder why the only newspaper report I have been able to find was from a Scottish newspaper and that there doesn’t appear to be any report in the local Leeds papers.

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Sunday’s Obituary – Dent Stowell (1882-1948)

Dent Stowell is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. I have written about Dent before, herehere and here.

Dent was born on 14 July 1882 in Burnley, Lancashire to parents Thomas Stowell and Ann Wroe. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff (my 4x great grandparents).

If you have read my previous posts you will know that Dent had an interesting life :-

  • he served in the Black Watch Regiment in South Africa in the Boer War and in France during WW1, being wounded more than once.
  • he had an unhappy first marriage but found love for a second time with Helen Gordon – however he was found guilty of bigamously marrying Helen in 1918, before finally marrying her legally in 1939.
  • he had eight children from his two marriages.
  • he lived in Canada and in the United States of America.

Dent passed away on 28 March 1948 and I recently discovered the following inquest report in the Burnley Express of 31 March 1948.

Dent Stowell - Inquest 31 March 1948.png

Man’s sudden death during night

“Death from natural causes” was the verdict recorded by the Burnley Deputy Coroner (Mr C Waddington) at an inquest on Monday on Dent Stowell (65), machine operator, of 89 Marlborough Street, who died on Sunday morning.

Mrs Helen Stowell said that her husband had served in the Boer and 1914-18 wars, and in the latter was wounded and badly gassed. His general health had not been good since 1918, but he had never had a serious illness. For the past four months he had complained of chest pains, but would not seek medical advice.

On Friday, the pains became worse, and on Saturday he said the pain felt like a lump in his chest. That evening she gave him a Seidlitz powder in warm water and, later, Indian Brandy in warm water, and they retired about 11.15pm. At 12.15am her husband got out of bed, and put the light out before returning.

Immediately he had got back into bed she heard strange noises coming from his throat, and, on putting on the light, found him struggling for breath. She helped him to sit up, but he collapsed in her arms. She ran out of the house and asked a passer-by to send for the police, who, on arrival, told her her husband had passed away.

Mr R O Davidson, consulting surgeon, said that he had conducted a post-mortem examination, and in his opinion death was due to cardiac failure, due to myocardial degeneration and coronary sclerosis.

After Dent’s death Helen moved to America to be with family who had emigrated there. She lived for another 36 years before passing away in 1984. Helen’s family brought her to England for burial alongside Dent and their son Percy in Burnley Cemetery, Lancashire.

Dent and Helen had thirty years together and I suspect could tell some tales about their experiences and adventures.

Sunday’s Obituary – Thomas Cracknell (1896-1942)

Thomas Cracknell is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Henry Cracknell and Ann Vickerman. Our common ancestors are Anthony Mason and Mary Brayshaw, my 4x great grandparents.

Thomas was born in Leeds, West Yorkshire on 6 October 1896. He was the youngest of six children born between 1887 and 1896. By the time of the 1911 census four of his siblings had died – only Thomas and his brother William Henry were still alive.

I have no more information about Thomas until he married Norah Milner in Wakefield, West Yorkshire sometime in the December quarter of 1924.

Thomas and Norah had one son – Alan Milner, his birth is registered in Wakefield in the September quarter of 1930. At the time the 1939 Register was taken on 29 September the family were living at Romany, Town Street, Middleton, Leeds, West Yorkshire.

Less than three years later Thomas died on 12 February 1942. Notice of his death was announced in the Yorkshire Evening Post on 14 February.

Thomas Cracknell - YEP 14 Feb 1942.png

CRACKNELL – February 12, at “Romany”, Town Street, Middleton, THOMAS CRACKNELL, Past Provincial Grand Master, Manchester Unity of Oddfellows, Leeds district. Interment Woodhouse Hill Cemetery, Monday, February 16, at 2.30pm. Members are requested to attend.

In his will Thomas left effects valued at £1092 3s 1d to his wife Norah.

The title of Past Provincial Grand Master sounds quite important so I thought I would include a link to information about the Manchester Unity of Oddfellows.

 

Sunday’s Obituary – Ernest Wallbank (1886-1944)

Ernest Wallbank is the husband of my 2nd cousin 2x removed, Sarah Ruston. Sarah’s parents are William Ruston and Ann Gawthrop. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley, my 3x great grandparents.

Ernest was born on 19 November 1886 at Earby, Yorkshire. He married Sarah Rushton sometime in the June quarter of 1908 – the marriage is registered in Skipton, Yorkshire.

Ernest and Sarah had two children – William and Annie.

In the 1911 census Ernest’s occupation is “farmer” and the family are living at Lower Clough Farm near Colne, Lancashire. By the time of the 1939 Register the family are at Higher Clough Farm near Colne and Ernest is a “dairy farmer”.

Ernest passed away on 2 January 1944 – his death was reported in the Barnoldswick & Earby Times on 14 January.

Ernest Wallbank - Barnoldswick & Earby Times 14 Jan 1944.png

Death of Mr Ernest Wallbank.

The funeral took place at Colne Cemetery on Thursday afternoon of last week of Mr Ernest Wallbank, of Higher Clough Farm, near Black Lane Ends, whose death occurred on the 2nd inst., at the age of 58 years. Much regret has been expressed at his passing and sympathy with his widow and the one son and daughter who survive him. Mr Wallbank was well known and highly esteemed, particularly in farming circles. He had many friends in Colne, where he had an extensive milk round. The Rev R A Jones officiated at a service at the house and also at Colne Cemetery. Floral tributes were received from the following: “In loving memory of a dear husband and father,” from his sorrowing wife and daughter; “In loving memory of a dear father,” Willie and Florence; “To dear grandad,” his two little pets, June and Eileen; Linda and John Thomas; Sister Libby; Jim and Mary; Mary, Winnie and Mary; All at Lingah (Crosshills); All at Piked Hedge and Harold; Mrs Rushton and Edith; Mr and Mrs J Driver and family; Linda, Norman and Doreen; Dick and Rennie; All at Hall Hill Farm; Mr and Mrs Crabtree and Allen; Mr and Mrs F Mellin and Mary; Mr and Mrs T Marsh; Mr and Mrs George Cowling, Keith and Elsie; Mr and Mrs S Proctor; Mr and Mrs R Smith and Mr and Mrs J Emmott; The neighbours and friends. Mr R Wood, Skelton Street, Colne, carried out the arrangements.

In his will Ernest left effects totalling £3401 0s 1d to his wife Sarah and son William.

Sunday’s Obituary – Norman Thornton (1912-1937)

Norman Thornton is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. His parents are Thomas Gawthrop Thornton and Ellen Quinliven. Our common ancestors are my 3x great parents Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley.

Norman was born in Keighley, West Yorkshire – his birth is registered in the September quarter of 1912.

I don’t have any information about Norman until his marriage to Mary Burland in Sheffield sometime in the September quarter of 1935.

I recently found the following report in the Sheffield Independent on 22 May 1937

Norman Thornton - 22 May 1937.png

GAS SUICIDE

Pincers Used To Turn Bracket Tap

Suicide during a state of depression due to domestic unhappiness, was the verdict given by Mr Alan P Lockwood, Sheffield Deputy Coroner, on Norman Thornton (24), grocers’ assistant, who was found gassed at his home in the early hours of yesterday morning.

Thornton, who was employed at Glossop Road branch of Sheffield and Ecclesall Co-operative Society, had not been at work this week. The branch had been closed Monday and Tuesday, since when Thornton had not been seen.

Thomas Thornton, 63 Ronksley Road, Shiregreen, said that his son was married in September, 1935, but they had not been happy. They had been separated, but came together again five months ago. His son’s wife had been in a convalescent home for the past fortnight.

Police-sergt, W Parnham said he went with the last witness to his son’s house, and by means of a ladder got to the bedroom. He found the young man dead. He had a flexible gas pipe in his mouth, connected to a gas bracket. Near him were a pair of pincers which he had evidently had to use to turn the tap on.

A sad end to a short life and what seems like an unhappy marriage.

I haven’t yet been able to find what happened to Norman’s wife Mary.

Sunday’s Obituary – Arthur Frederick Lord (1906-1946)

Arthur Frederick Lord is my 4th cousin 1x removed. His parents are Charles Lord and Sarah Lonsdale. Our common ancestors are Isaac Kighley and Ellen Jackson, my 4x great grandparents.

Arthur was born on 20 January 1906 in Rochester, Kent. In the 1911 census he is living at 190 High Street, Rochester.

As far as I can establish Arthur joined the Merchant Navy as a cadet in June 1921. His identity certificate number was 209328 (see below) and he was serving on the SS Gothic Star (Official No. of ship 108793).

Arthur F Lord - Cadet Certificate.png

I don’t have a comprehensive record of Artur’s service in the Merchant Navy but I do know that he obtained a Certificate of Competency as Second Mate on 11 May 1927.

Arthur F Lord - 2nd Mate Certificate.png

On one of his stays back in the UK Arthur married Hazel Walkem sometime in the March quarter of 1934 in Woolwich, London. Later that year their only child, David, was born on 28 December, also in Woolwich.

When the 1939 Register was taken in September that year Hazel and David are living at Lee Mount, Shoreditch Road, Taunton, Somerset. Arthur doesn’t appear in the register – he was presumably away at sea.

Moving forward seven years to 1946 we find Arthur working as a Chief Officer aboard Screw Steamer Rembrandt – a ship built by Lithgows Ltd in Glasgow, Scotland. The Rembrandt was launched as a cargo ship on 30 August 1940, its first owner was the Bolton Steam Shipping Co. Ltd in London.

201608302116290.2. Capetan-antonis ex Rembrandt 1940-8-30

Screw Steamer Rembrandt

Now this is where my story about Arthur Frederick Lord reaches its conclusion. According to the Deaths at Sea Register Arthur disappeared on 19 November 1946 sometime between 11.30am and 4.00pm. He was presumed to have fallen overboard. The latitude and longitude co-ordinates given in the register – Latitude 36º 26´N : Longitude 18º 19´E – put the ship in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea – somewhere between Greece and Malta and North of Lybia.

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Arthur F Lord - Death at Sea (2).png

Arthur F Lord - Death at Sea (3).png

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In his will Arthur left effects totalling £1241 11s 3d to Albert Leslie Binns, chartered accountant. This was his brother-in-law, husband of his sister Florence May.

Arthur F Lord - Probate.png

Sunday’s Obituary – Joseph Musgrove (1866-1933)

Joseph Musgrove is my great grandfather. He was born on 1 December 1866 in Kendal, Westmorland, to parents Harrison Musgrove and Jane Rooking.

Joseph was the youngest of eight children. He was baptised on 21 April 1867 in Kendal. Less than a year later his father (Harrison) died on 16 April 1868. Then when Joseph was six years old his mother (Jane) died on 12 April 1873.

I guess that Joseph would have been looked after by his older siblings after the death of their parents. And in the 1881 census he is boarding with his eldest sister Agnes and her husband David Hutchinson at Albert Hill in Settle, West Yorkshire.

By the time of the next census on 5 April 1891 Joseph was back in Westmorland working as an agricultural labourer and living on a farm in Duke Street, Holme – about 10 miles south of Kendal.

Just over two years later Joseph married Elizabeth Ann Turner on 12 April 1893 at Settle Register Office.

Not sure what it is about the month of April but all the previous significant events happened in that month!!!

Anyway, Joseph and Elizabeth journeyed south to Clitheroe in Lancashire – stopping off on their way for three or four years at Horton in Ribblesdale, West Yorkshire, where Joseph worked in the limestone quarry. Their first three children were born and baptised here.

At this time the family lived at Foredale Cottages – in the photograph below you can see the cottages on the hillside below the quarry.

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In the 1901 and 1911 census returns Joseph is still working as a limestone quarryman – now at the local Clitheroe quarry.

Over a period of about 20 years Joseph and Elizabeth had ten children:-

John Robert Turner Musgrove – born 2 November 1891
Thomas Musgrove – born cMarch 1894
Florrie Musgrove – born 6 January 1897
Mary Elizabeth Musgrove – born 22 August 1899
James Musgrove – born 9 April 1901
Joseph Musgrove – born cSeptember 1903
Leah Musgrove – born 28 July 1905
Isabel Musgrove – born 12 July 1906
Alice Musgrove – born 23 August 1910
Joseph Musgrove – born 23 October 1912

Sadly Joseph developed stomach cancer and he died at home on 30 September 1933. He was buried at Clitheroe Cemetery on 4 October 1933.

The archives for the Clitheroe Advertiser & Times have recently been added to the British Newspaper Archives website. I just discovered the following obituary.

Joseph Musgrove - Clitheroe Advertiser Sep 1933.png

A further death we have to record is that of Mr Joseph Musgrove, of 28 Russell Street. Mr Musgrove, who was sixty-six years of age, died on Sunday after a brief illness. Since the war Mr Musgrove had carried on business as a general dealer and was particularly well known among the farming community, his business bringing him into contact with farmers at the Clitheroe Auction Mart. A native of Kendal he had lived in Clitheroe for forty years, and for more than twenty years resided in Salford. At one period he was employed as a quarryman at Bold Venture Quarries. He leaves a widow, three sons and five daughters. The interment took place at St Mary’s Cemetery on Wednesday, the Rev S E Harper officiating.