Sunday’s Obituary

Sunday’s Obituary – Michael John Covington Gooch(1921-1945)

Michael John Covington Gooch is my wife’s 5th cousin 1x removed. His parents are John George Gooch and Beatrice Mabel Covington. Their common ancestors are David Gostelow and Mary Dawson – my wife’s 5x great grandparents.

Michael was born on 6 December 1921 in Bedford, Bedfordshire.

In 1941 Michael joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. His military service number was 132302.

Michael was killed in an aircraft accident on his 24 birthday – 6 December 1945. The following obituary is from the Bedfordshire Times and Independent of Friday 14 December 1945 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Michael J C Gooch - Bedfordshire Times & IndependentAN OLD BEDFORDIAN’S FATAL CRASH

Killed on Twenty-Fourth Birthday

An aircraft accident off the Island of Sylt on Thursday of last week, his twenty-fourth birthday, cost the life of Flight-Lieut. Michael John Covington Gooch, R.A.F.V.R., B.A.F.O., the only son of Mrs. B.M. Gooch, of 13 Pemberley Avenue, Bedford, and the rest of his crew. It is understood that he was piloting his usual Mosquito aircraft while bombing at a low level over the sea, and was seen to crash about a mile away from the island.

An Old Bedfordian, Flight-Lieut. Gooch was at the School from 1933 until 1939, when he joined the staff of the Igranic Electric Company as a pupil engineer. In April 1941 he volunteered for duty with the Royal Air Force, receiving part of his training in Alabama, U.S.A., where he was made a Corporal in the United States Army Air Corps. After a further period of service in Canada, he retuned to this country and completed his training at Cranwell, gaining his wings and a commission. He later gained certificates as a navigator and instructor.
His navigator, Flight-Lieut. M. Holmes, and he were never separated on their tours of operational duty, which lasted until VE Day, and were both killed together.
Flight-Lieut. Gooch was a keen amateur photographer, and took pictures while operating with Coastal Command, many of which were published in the Press and on the screen.
On an armament course at the time of his death, he was one of the first pilots to fire rocket projectiles from an aircraft.

Sunday’s Obituary – Joseph Gostelow (1858-1894)

Joseph Gostelow is my wife’s 3rd cousin 3x removed. His parents are Joseph Gostelow and Eliza White. Their common ancestors are David Gostelow and Mary Dawson – my wife’s 5x great grandparents.

Joseph was born in Spalding, Lincolnshire sometime in the 4th quarter of 1858. He was baptised at the Spalding church of St Mary & St Nicolas on 19 December 1858.

By the time of the 1881 census Joseph was following in the footsteps of his father and his occupation is given as “Master Mariner”.

On 6 Mar 1884 Joseph married Alice Mary Toynton at St Mary & St Nicolas church. Over the next 11 years they had seven sons:-
Harry
Joseph William
Robert
Frederick William
Percy
George
Thompson

Joseph died on 22 December 1894, at the age of 36, when his boat was lost in the North Sea. The following newspaper report is from the Boston Guardian of 12 January 1895 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Joseph Gostelow - Boston Guardian 12 Jan 1895

All hope has been abandoned of the safety of the schooner Mary Jane, Capt. Joseph Gostelow, which left Shields for Fosdyke Bridge on December 21st last with coal for the Spalding Gas Company, and has not been heard of since. She had a crew of four, all Spalding men, all of whom are stated to be single with the exception of the captain, who leaves a widow and four children. Capt. Gostelow was a member of the Boston Shipwreck Society.

None of the sons became mariners.

Sunday’s Obituary -Josephine Irene Seale (nee Gooch) 1927-2006

Josephine Irene Gooch is my wife’s 5th cousin 1x removed. Their common ancestors are David Gostelow and Mary Dawson – my wife’s 5x great grandparents.
The following obituary is available on the Internet.

000324746_20061216_1Seale, Josephine Irene (nee Gooch), died on December 10, 2006, at the Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria, British Columbia with her two sons, Martin and David, by her side. Josephine was born on June 14, 1927, in Spalding, Lincolnshire, the youngest daughter of Harry and Irene Gooch. A local beauty, known for her lovely singing voice, Josephine left Spalding to be educated at Bedford and then the Guild Hall School of Music and Drama in London. She then embarked on a theatrical and cinematic career that was punctuated by her marriage to a dashing, young doctor, Guy Screech. Guy was enlisted in the SAS, a Special Forces unit of the British Army, and the couple was soon off to Malaya where Guy fought the communist insurgency, and Josephine worked as a clerk for military intelligence. Malaya was also where Josephine appeared in her last movie, “A Town Like Alice,” sharing the screen with Peter Finch and Virginia McKenna.
As Josephine frequently reminded Martin in later years, her route to cinematic stardom was cut short by his birth in 1956. By then the family was back in England, and planning to immigrate to Canada. After several years in West Vancouver, and the birth of her second son, David, the family headed back to Malaya. After two more glorious years in the tropics, a brief return to Vancouver, and the end of her first marriage, Josephine settled in Victoria with both of her sons.
Shortly after Josephine’s second marriage to Peter Seale, she moved to a magnificent old house at 1926 Crescent Rd in Victoria, and for many years the house became synonymous with Josephine’s hospitality, and, in particular, her magnificent Boxing Day parties. After she and Peter parted ways, Josephine went to work at the Emergency Department of the Jubilee Hospital, and she continued there until close to retirement age. In her spare time, she returned to her first love, the theatre, and appeared in numerous productions at the Langham Court Theatre. She also traveled back to England on an almost annual basis to spend time with family and friends, particularly her beloved friend Maggie.
In the 1970’s Josephine met the man who brought her substantial happiness in the latter half of her life. Harry Housser was a charming lawyer whose generosity of spirit and love of a good party, perfectly complemented Josephine’s glamour and outgoing personality. Although they were wise enough to maintain separate residences during their 20-year relationship, their bond was strong, and Josephine grieved deeply when Harry died in 1995.
Another challenge faced by Josephine was the loss of a substantial portion of her sight in the early 1990’s. Within a very short period of time Josephine went from somebody who could zip around in her Mini Minor (albeit, in a rather hazardous fashion) to somebody who was forced to listen to her books rather than read them. This resulted in a long-standing relationship with the talking books section of the public library (to whom she was grateful to the end), and a change in lifestyle that she absorbed with courage and grace.
In her early days Josephine was an actress by profession; later on it was by inclination. In combination with her natural eccentricity and personal charm, this made her a welcome, if sometimes controversial, addition to any social gathering. She was fond of casually outrageous opinions about affairs of the day delivered with a mock seriousness designed simultaneously to irritate and amuse. She was a strong and unusual personality that people naturally gravitated to. For all of this she was loved by her family and friends, and will be sorely missed.
Josephine is survived by her sons Martin and David Screech, David’s wife Jean and their children.

Sunday’s Obituary – Olive Mary Kitching (nee Atkin)1891-1956

Olive Mary Atkin is my wife’s 4th cousin 2x removed. Her parents are Edwin William Atkin and Ann Gostelow. Their common ancestors are David Gostelow and Mary Dawson – my wife’s 5x great grandparents.

Olive was born on 15 October 1891 in Friskney, Lincolnshire.

On 20 April 1920 Olive married Frank Kitching. They had three daughters over the next five years:-

Joyce Edith
Margaret Olive
Gwendoline May

Frank’s occupation was a “miller and baker”. In the 1939 Register (taken at the outbreak of WW2) the family were living at The Mill, Friskney, Lincolnshire.

All three daughters married between 1947-1951.

By the end of 1956 their lives would be changed by two tragedies.

The following story is from the Skegness Standard of Wednesday 4 July 1956 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

HUSBAND’S TRAGIC DISCOVERYSkegness Standard - 4 July 1956

THOUGHT WIFE WAS IN BED: HE FOUND HER DEAD

FRISKNEY INQUEST VERDICT

A story of mental ill-health, aggravated by the tragic death of her daughter, was revealed at the inquest on Friday on Mrs. Olive Mary Kitching, aged 64, of the Mill, Friskney, who was found hanging from the foot of a bed at her home on the previous Tuesday night.

A verdict of “Suicide while the balance of her mind was disturbed” was recorded by the Spilsby Deputy Coroner (Mr. J.C. Walter), who heard how the husband, Mr. Frank Kitching, the local miller, returned home at 10.30pm, thinking his wife was in bed, and had his supper and undressed for bed before making the tragic discovery.

Evidence of identification was given by the husband, who said that when he left home at about 6.25pm on Tuesday his wife seemed all right and in her usual state of health. He retuned home at 10.30pm and saw the evening paper on the mat inside the door.
He read the paper whilst having his supper, his wife having apparently gone to bed.
At about 11.15pm he went upstairs to bed and did not bother to switch on the bedroom light, but got undressed first. Just before getting into bed he noticed that his wife was not in bed, so he looked in the other rooms for her.

“Was Very Upset”

Switching on the light in the back bedroom he saw his wife hanging from the foot of the bed by a scarf which was round her neck.
He lifted her up, untied the scarf and laid her on the floor. She was cold and stiff and he realised she was dead. He telephoned for a doctor and also for Mr. Clow, a neighbour.
Mr. Kitching told the Coroner his wife had had a mental illness some fifteen or twenty years ago. She got better but was very upset again last year when they lost a daughter in tragic circumstances.
She seemed to get over that but the previous Thursday she had told him “I believe I have got that depression coming again.”
She seemed to improve, however, and he thought it would be all right to leave her. She had no physical illness and was very active for her age.
She often went to bed early if he was going out and left him to get his own supper and he thought nothing of it when he returned home that night and found she had gone to bed.

Doctor’s Evidence

Dr. Mary Margaret Trayers, of Wrangle, said she was called to the house at 11.40pm and found Mrs. Kitching in the back bedroom, lying on the floor with a pink scarf round her neck. She formed the opinion that she had been dead about five hours.
In her mouth was a small green handkerchief, which she removed with P.C. Welch’s assistance. There was a mark round her neck caused by the body having been hanging from the bedpost.
Replying to the Coroner, Dr. Trayers said deceased’s feet were not on the floor. The body was almost in a stooping position with the knees bent.
The Coroner asked if one would lose consciousness quickly if there was anything round the neck, and the doctor replied “Yes, and the handkerchief would accelerate that.”

Sleeplessness

She said she had twice attended Mrs. Kitching for depression and sleeplessness. A year ago it was arranged that she should enter a mental hospital as a voluntary patient, but she improved so much that eventually she did not go.
The body bore no marks of violence except that round her neck, and death was due to asphyxiation.
Frank Bentley Clow, produce merchant, of Bentley House, Friskney, said he received a telephone call from Mr. Kitching and ‘phoned the police. He had known Mrs. Kitching for 40 years and she suffered from depression after he daughter’s death. He had never heard her threaten to take her own life.
Another neighbour, Sidney Brant, wheelwright and undertaker, of “Sunniholme.” Friskney, said he had known deceased for fifty years and she had at times suffered from depression and had recently withdrawn from public life.
P.C. Welch said the scarf round Mrs. Kitching’s neck had been knotted to form two loops. She appeared to have dropped back.
Although he searched the house he could find no note.
The Coroner said it was evident that deceased had taken her own life whilst the balance of her mind was disturbed.

So a very said story indeed – bit it left me with an unanswered question. What were the tragic events that lead to the death of Frank and Olive’s daughter?

Further research revealed that their daughter Margaret Olive had married Terence Rogers in 1947. I discovered the following article in the Cheshire Observer of Saturday 28 May 1955 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

NO TRACE OF HANDBRIDGE WOMANCheshire Observer - 28 May 1955

Who Has Been Missing Since 10th May

There is still no trace of 32-years-old Mrs. Margaret Olive Rogers, of 19 Eaton Avenue, Handbridge, who has been missing from her home since 7.15am on Tuesday, May 10th.
Mrs. Rogers’s description is as follows: Height, 5ft. 3in.; slim build; pale complexion (looks ill); operation scars on front of throat; fair hair and blue eyes.
She was wearing a light green skirt and blouse, a black cardigan, a grey belted overcoat, nylon stockings, and red, flat-heeled shoes.

I couldn’t find any other newspaper reports about the disappearance.

Sadly I was able to find an entry in the National Probate Calendar which confirms that Margaret Olive was last seen alive on 10 May 1955 and her dead body was found on 31 May 1955 at Cheese Wharf, Sealand Road, Chester.

National Probate Calendar

A very sad story indeed for this Sunday Obituary post.

Sunday’s Obituary – William Riley (1860-1929)

William Riley is my 1st cousin 3x removed. His parents are John Riley and Ann Gawthrop. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley (my 3x great grandparents).

William was born in Colne, Lancashire sometime in the last quarter of 1860. He was the first child of John and Ann Riley and he had three younger sisters – Ann, Mary and Margaret.

In the 1861 census the family are living at Garth Holme, Colne.

William’s father, John, died in 1866 at the age of 26. So by the time of the next census in 1871 Ann was a widow with four young children. She was working as a worsted weaver. These would have been really difficult times for Ann and the children.

Not surprisingly, sometime in the June quarter of 1873 Ann married John Hodgson and they had three children. John, Ann and the seven children are together in the 1881 census at Belle Vue, Great & Little Marsden, Lancashire.

In the 1881 census William is listed as a warp dresser – an occupation he would keep until his death.

Just over three years later on the 6 November 1884 William married Ellen Fletcher at St John the Evangelist church Great Marsden. Over the next 16 years they had six children – but sadly two of the first three died in infancy.

At some point around the start of the 20th century William became active in the newly formed Labour Party. He was first elected as an unopposed candidate to Nelson Town Council on Tuesday 10 November 1903 – see report from the Burnley Gazette of 14 November 1903 below (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Riley - Burnley Gazette 14 Nov 1903.png

On Tuesday, another Labour candidate was given a walk-over at Nelson. The vacancy was in Central Ward, and was caused by the elevation of Councillor Reed to the Aldermanic Bench. It was thought that Mr. S. Davies (C), a former member of the Council, would have contested the ward, but, beaten before by the Labour element, he was evidently not inclined to come forward again. The unopposed candidate was Mr. William Riley, warp-dresser. There must be four or five warp-dressers on the Council now.

William remained active in the local community until his death on 11 August 1929.

The Burnley Express published the following obituary on Wednesday 14 August 1929 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Riley - Burnley Express 14 Aug 1929.png

NELSON ALDERMAN’S DEATH

A GREAT HOSPITAL ORGANSIER

By the death of Alderman William Riley, who died at his home, 93 Clayton Street, last Sunday night, Nelson has sustained the loss of one of its best public workers and a gentleman who had earned general respect. He will be long remembered as the first salaried organising secretary of the Reedyford Hospital, a position to which he was appointed in March, 1920, and his duties were to organise the raising of funds for the maintenance of the hospital, which came into vogue during the war, when most useful service was rendered to the wounded soldiers who were temporarily accommodated there. At the time of his appointment there were practically no funds available, and Alderman Riley at once initiated schemes with the object of raising money. He worked out a weekly voluntary contributory scheme for the mills and workshops, with the result that when he resigned early in September of last year, as the result of failing health, there were no fewer than 8000 contributors. The fact that the work people’s contributions were so well maintained during the long period of trade depression was a tribute to his persistent energy and resourcefulness. His position necessitated tact as well as dogged perseverance, but Alderman Riley succeeded admirably in surmounting all difficulties, and, on his resignation, he fully deserved the expression of gratitude for his lengthy and valuable service.

Alderman Riley, who was 68 years of age, had also had extensive service on the Nelson Town Council, of which he originally became a member in the Labour interest in 1903. After ten intervening years he was again elected as a representative of Southfield Ward, retaining his position as a councillor until 1927, when he was promoted to the Aldermanic Bench. As a public representative, he was ever a zealous and conscientious worker, and at the time of his death he was a member of the General Purposes, Finance, Gas, Water, and Baths, Watch, Parks, and Free Library, and Electricity, Light Railway, and Omnibuses Committees. 

He was formerly a warp dresser, and was a member of the committee of the Nelson and District Warp Dressers’ Association. He was connected with the Baptist cause at Carr Road Church, with which he had a long association.

I think that is a fitting tribute to someone who gave many years to public service.

Sunday’s Obituary – Walter Fletcher (1883-1952)

Walter Fletcher was the husband of Jane Musgrove – my 1st cousin 2x removed.

I have previously written about their marriage here and Jane’s obituary here.

Walter was born on 8 August 1883. He lived in Clitheroe, Lancashire all his life. He was active in many areas of community life as reflected in the obituary below from the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 15 February 1952 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Walter Fletcher - CAT 15 February 1952.png

MR WALTER FLETCHER

Clitheroe lost one of its best known personalities by the sudden death on Saturday of Mr Walter Fletcher, of 7 Chester Avenue. Mr Fletcher was among spectators at the football match at Shaw Bridge when he collapsed and died whilst the crowd stood in silence in memory of King George.
Mr Fletcher, who was 68, was a native of Clitheroe, and until his retirement two years ago had been wages clerk at Jubilee Mill for more than 40 years.
He was a prominent figure in local music circles, and in the early days of the cinema he acted as pianist for the silent films, drawing on a remarkable memory to match his music to the action. He was also a concert and dance band pianist, prominent in many social events for a long period.
In addition to his musical talents, Mr Fletcher was also an artist of some repute, a clever cartoonist and with pleasing water colours to his credit. He often designed stage settings and painted the scenery required for local amateur shows.
Mr Fletcher was keenly interested in sport. Bowls provided his favourite pastime, and he was at one time captain of the bowling team of Clitheroe Cricket, Bowling and Tennis Club, in which he took a great interest. His membership of the Clitheroe Sports (Fishing) Club reflected a keen interest in angling, and he was also one of Clitheroe Football Club’s best known supporters, rarely, if ever, missing a home match.
For many years he was a member of Clitheroe Conservative Club and of the R.A.O.B., and during the war he held the rank of inspector in the Clitheroe branch of the Special Constabulary.
A widower, Mr Fletcher leaves three married daughters, who will have sympathy in their bereavement.
Directors and members of the staff of Jubilee Mill and representatives of the R.A.O.B. were among those attending the funeral at St. Mary’s Cemetery on Wednesday. The Rev. C J Guildford officiated.

Sunday’s Obituary – Esther Ann Salt (nee Espley) 1866-1935

Esther Ann Espley is my wife’s 3rd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are John Espley and Emma Gibson. Their common ancestor is John Aspley – my wife’s 4x great grandfather.

Esther was born on 12 December 1866 – her birth is registered in Leek, Staffordshire. Esther’s mother Emma Gibson came from Spalding in Lincolnshire. So eighteen months after Esther’s birth the family travelled over 100 miles to Lincolnshire where Esther was baptised at a small village called Cowbit – about three miles from Spalding – on 14 June 1868.

Just over twenty years later, on 17 July 1888 Esther married Alfred Salt at Saints Philip & James, Milton, Staffordshire. Over the next 22 years Alfred and Esther had 11 children.

Esther passed away on Friday 24 May 1935. Details of her funeral were published in the Tamworth Herald on Saturday 1 June 1935 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Esther Ann Salt (nee Espley) - Tamworth Herald 1 June 1935.png

FUNERAL – The funeral took place in the Amington Cemetery on Wednesday, the Rev. H. Chamberlain officiating, of Mrs. Alfred Salt, who passed away on Friday, at School Lane, Amington, aged 68 years. She was highly respected, having resided in Amington for over 35 years. The chief mourners were: Mr. Alfred Salt (widower); Messrs. John William Salt, Alfred Salt, Albert Salt, Joseph Salt, Frederick George Salt (sons); Mesdames J. Smith, S. Chappell, A.W. Chappell, Mrs. G. Hill (daughters); Mr. and Mrs. A. Allcock (brother and sister-iin-law); Mrs. L. Kelsey (sister-in-law, Hanley); Messrs. J. Smith, S. Chappell, G. Hill (sons-in-law); Mrs J. W. Salt (daughter-in-law); and Mr. W. Kelsea (nephew, of Hanley). There was a large number of beautiful floral tributes from the family, the neighbours, and the Amington Liberal Workingmen’s Club, of which Mr. Alfred Salt, jun., is the secretary. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr. H. Starkey, of Tamworth.

Sunday’s Obituary – Charles Neville (1877-1955)

Charles Neville (often spelt as Nevill in official records) is the husband of my wife’s 2nd cousin 2x removed, Sarah Jane Espley.

Sarah’s parents are Henry Espley and Ellen Hannah Clewley. The link with Sarah is from my wife’s 3x great grandparents James Espley and Martha Silvester.

Charles was born on 1 June 1877 in Lichfield, Staffordshire. He married Sarah Jane sometime in the fourth quarter of 1897 in Lichfield.

Charles passed away on 17 September 1955. The Lichfield Mercury carried his obituary on Friday 23 September 1955 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Charles Neville - Lichfield Mercury 25 September 1955.png

Former Member of Bower Committee

LICHFIELD DEATH OF MR. C. NEVILLE

A native of the city Mr. Charles Neville (78), 137 Sandford Street, Lichfield died on Saturday.
Mr. Neville was born in Beacon Street, but at an early age his parents moved to Sandford Street where he had resided ever since. A painter and journeyman, Mr. Neville had been employed by Lichfield City Council and after retiring four years ago he obtained a situation on the maintenance staff of the Wiltell Works in St. John Street.
Mr. Neville was a keen supporter of local football and was trainer for the Lichfield Phoenix club when they played on a ground at Gaia Fields. He had also served in a similar capacity with Lichfield United, whose ground was at the Barn Field in St. John Street. His interest in the sport never waned and up to the time of his death he followed the St. Chad’s club going to most of the away matches. For many years he was a member of the Greenhill Bower committee and rendered good service particularly with the decoration of tableaux.
Mr. Neville is survived by his wife, four daughters and five sons. The funeral took place at Christ Church on Wednesday, the vicar (Rev. G. H. Maydew), officiating.

Sunday’s Obituary – John Espley (1869-1945)

John Espley is my wife’s 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Joseph Booth Espley and Christiana Boyle. Their common ancestor is Martha Espley – my wife’s 2x great grandmother.

John was born on 5 May 1869 in Macclesfield, Cheshire.

In the 1891 census John was with his uncle & aunt Frederick Espley and Frances Espley in Biddulph, Staffordshire. He was working as an iron turner. By the time of the following census in 1901 John was living in Burnley, Lancashire working as a builders labourer.

On 7 December 1901 John married Sarah Booth at St Matthew the Apostle church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

Sarah was a young widow of 25. Her maiden name was Sarah Baines Turner. She had married Samuel Booth in the first quarter of 1897 in Burnley. Samuel died three years later. This left Sarah on her own with three children under three years old – Betty, Jane and Samuel.

By the time of the 1911 census John and Sarah had six children of their own but sadly two died in infancy. By now John was working in the water department of the Burnley Borough Council.

John was a conscientious employee for the water department and eventually retired from there in 1934. The Burnley Express of Saturday 5 May 1934 reported on his retirement (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

John Espley - Burnley Express 5 May 1934.png

THIRTY-THREE YEARS WITH WATER DEPARTMENT

After completing 33 years service with the Burnley Corporation Water Department, Mr. John Espley, of 14 Hawk Street, enters into a well-earned retirement today. Mr. Espley, who is 65 years of age, has served under three managers, and for over 20 years has been a foreman with the department.
He holds the proud record of never having been late for 32 years. One day, when he had been with the department about 12 months, he arrived five minutes late and was sent home for three days. He has never been late since! Mr. Espley is interested in gardening, with which he occupies much of his spare time.

John’s retirement lasted for eleven years before he died on 4 June 1945. He was buried three days later in Burnley cemetery.

The Burnley Express reported on his death on Saturday 9 June 1945.

John Espley - Burnley Express 9 June 1945.png

MR. JOHN ESPLEY

The death of Mr. John Espley (76) took place at his home, 81 Albert Street, Burnley, on Monday, after a short illness. Mr. Espley, a well-known Fulledge resident, was employed by the Burnley Corporation Water Department for about 33 years, being a foreman for about 20 years. He retired about 11 years ago. The funeral took place at the Burnley Cemetery on Thursday, preceded by a service in the Latter Day Saints’ Chapel, Rosegrove, with which he was connected. Elder John R. Moore and Elder W. Duckworth officiated. Arrangements: Mr. Joseph Harling, 29 Yorkshire Street.

Sarah lived for a further 13 months – she was buried on 29 July 1946 in Burnley Cemetery.

Sunday’s Obituary – Alfred Chadwick (1871-1874)

Alfred Chadwick is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. His parents are Benjamin Towler Chadwick and Susannah Jane Lister. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff (my 4x great grandparents).

Alfred’s mother, Susannah, is my 1st cousin 4x removed. She was born in Burnley, Lancashire sometime in the March quarter of 1849 to parents Richard Lister and Jane Stowell.

In the 1861 census Susannah and her sister Mary Ellen were pupils at the Servants School in Casterton, near Kendal, Westmorland. Perhaps being trained for a life in service. That sort of life didn’t happen for Susannah, but I’m not sure the alternative was much better for her.

On 11 October 1868 Susannah married Benjamin Towler Chadwick at St James church, Burnley. As far as I can tell they had six children – but sadly four of them died in infancy, including Alfred.

The following article is from the Burnley Gazette of 2 January 1875 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Alfred Chadwick - Burnley Gazette 2 Jan 1875.png

A CHILD BURNED TO DEATH – An inquest was held at the Borough Hotel, Burnley, on Saturday morning, before Mr. H. U. Hargreaves, coroner, on the body of Alfred Chadwick, a boy aged 31/2 years, who died on Friday last from the effects of burns which he received on Wednesday the 23rd instant. — Susannah Jane Chadwick, wife of Benjamin Chadwick, of Piccadilly Road, said her husband was a lawyer’s clerk. The deceased was her son, and was burnt on Wednesday, the 23rd instant., about ten minutes to two o’clock. Witness had left the boy in the back kitchen, where she had lighted a fire for the use of a washerwoman, and had not been out of the place above a minute when she heard a scream; and on going to see what it was she found the boy lying on his face and his pinafore on fire. She had previously placed some clothes on a clothes “horse” in front of the fire, but they were not touched by the fire, and the boy had crept underneath. She wrapped a sheet around him immediately and put the fire out. The boy told her that his brother, who was in the kitchen with him, had given him a stick, and that he had gone underneath the “winter-hedge” and put it into the fire. The brother, who was a little older, told his mother that he did not notice the deceased to be on fire until he screamed, and then he called out to his mother. The elder brother denied having given deceased a stick. The deceased was burnt on the face, left arm, and knees, and his death occurred on Friday morning between seven and eight o’clock. — Dr. Smithwaite attended the deceased. —The jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was accidentally burned to death.

This must surely have been a terrible time for the whole family.

Susannah then died at the relatively young age of 41 on 23 May 1890 and I do wonder whether she ever got over the tragic death of Alfred.