Hull Daily Mail

Workday Wednesday – George Robert Newman (1881-1977)

Eva Gawthrop is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are John Thomas Gawthrop and Annie Elizabeth Salisbury. Our common ancestors are John Gawthrop and Sarah Brown – my 4x great grandparents.

Eva was born on 9 May 1899 in Barrow in Furness, Lancashire.

In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2, Eva was living with her sister May Kirkby and family at Holker Street, Barrow in Furness. Eva was working as an “engine tracer (shipping)”. I had to look up the occupation to find out a bit more. The job involved tracing plans for the navy ships which were drawn up by the draughtsmen then photographed onto blueprints for building them. You had to be very accurate as you weren’t allowed to rub out any mistakes. You had a long period of training and supervision (a three year apprenticeship) and a great deal of practice before being allowed to work unsupervised.

Sometime in the March quarter of 1950 Eva married George Robert Newman in Barrow in Furness.

George Robert was a widower. He was born in 1881 and had married Nellie Key in 1908. They had one son, Leslie born in 1914. Nellie died at the age of 66 on18 January 1949.

So Eva and George Robert were a mature couple when they married. In fact George Robert had a long career as a Police officer in Hull, Yorkshire. At the time of his marriage to Eva her had been retired for almost 17 years. I found the following article in the Hull Daily Mail of Thursday 31 August 1933 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Hull Daily Mail - 31 Aug 1933.png

LEAVING HULL POLICE

Officer Who Served in Every Division

Today Hull bids an official farewell to one of its police chiefs, Superintendent George Robert Newman, who has been in the Force for nearly 29 years, and now retires on pension.
Mr Newman can lay claim to having served in each of the police divisions of the city at least once, and in some twice. Further, he has served under four Chief Constables: Major P. Malcolm, Mr George Morley, the late Captain Woods, and the present Chief Constable, Mr T. E. Howden.
Superintendent Newman joined the force in November, 1904, and after being at Wincolmlee station for about two years he was transferred to the Fire Brigade station. Here he remained for 14 years. In 1921 he was promoted to sergeant and transferred to the Central Division as a section sergeant.
In 1923 he again received promotion, this time to station sergeant, and took up duty at Norfolk Street station until 1925, when he was made an inspector and transferred to Wincolmlee. After a year he was again moved to the Central Station, remaining for two years.

IN CHARGE OF DIVISION
In 1928 he was raised to the rank of Chief Inspector, and was placed in charge of Crowle Street until 1929. He was then moved to Gordon Street, and placed in charge of the division. In the same year Mr Newman was appointed as Superintendent, and remained in charge of West Hull until his retirement.
Actually Superintendent Newman has served for 28 years and 9 months. During the past three years he has undertaken prosecutions for the police twice per week.
He is president of the International Police Association and the Police Temperance Society, while he is also interested in the Temporary Home for young people in Hull.
Mr Newman, who has earned the respect of everyone except lawbreakers, will remain in Hull after his retirement.

George Robert passed away at the age of 96 on 15 November 1977. Eva died 15 months later on 21 February 1979 at the age of 79.

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Sunday’s Obituary – Daniel John Burns (1897-1928)

Daniel John Burns is my wife’s 2nd cousin 1x removed. His birth is registered in the first quarter of 1897 in Glamorganshire, Wales. Daniel’s parents are Thomas Burns and Lucy Skelding. The family connection between Daniel and my wife is from William Skelding and Catherine Taylor – my wife’s 2x great grandparents.

Daniel appears in the 1901 and 1911 census returns in Llanbradach, Glamorganshire. He was the last of nine children born to Thomas and Lucy.

In 1911 at the age of 13 Daniel’s occupation as given in the census is “coal miner hewer”.

When WW1 started Daniel enlisted for service at Caerphilly on 11 December 1915. He was initially assigned to the Army Reserve with the 17th Lancers.

On 26 April 1918 Daniel had another medical examination and was subsequently transferred to the Tank Corps with a regimental service number of 313324 on 10 September 1918.

After the end of hostilities Daniel was transferred to Class Z Army Reserve on 16 January 1919. The Class Z Reserve was authorised by an Army Order of 3 December 1918. There were fears that Germany would not accept the terms of any peace treaty, and therefore the British Government decided it would be wise to be able to quickly recall trained men in the eventuality of the resumption of hostilities. Soldiers who were being demobilised, particularly those who had agreed to serve “for the duration”, were at first posted to Class Z. They returned to civilian life but with an obligation to return if called upon. The Z Reserve was abolished on 31 March 1920.

Within nine years Daniel would be dead.

As far as I can tell Daniel returned to the coal mines after the war. Sadly though, it appears he started to suffer with mental health issues and was admitted to the Angleton Asylum in Bridgend, Wales around May 1927.

The following article is from the Western Mail on 12 October 1928.

Daniel John Burns - Western Mail 12 October 1928.png

BRIDGEND PATIENTS ACT

The practice of allowing certain patients to be on parole without attendants was defended by Dr. McGregor, assistant medical officer at the Glamorgan County Medical Hospital, Bridgend, at the inquest at Bridgend on Thursday on Daniel John Burns (31), assistant haulier, Llanbradach, who threw himself under an omnibus.

Dr. McGregor explained that patients were only allowed to go out in this way when the medical staff were satisfied that their recovery was practically complete.

The Coroner said no criticism could be levelled at the institution.

The jury returned a verdict of “Suicide during temporary insanity” and exonerated the driver from blame.

Some of the other headlines reporting the events were not quite as moderate. For example the 

Belfast Telegraph said: LUNATIC JUMPS UNDER OMNIBUS

Northern Whig (County Antrim, Northern Ireland) said: LUNATIC JUMPS UNDER BUS

Hull Daily Mail  said: MENTAL PATIENT’S FATAL WALK

I’m left wondering whether it was the impact of war that caused Daniel’s ill health – probably something that wasn’t acknowledged then.

Wedding Wednesday – Edith Stephenson and Ernest Northcote Morfitt

Edith Stephenson is my wife’s 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are Charles Stephenson and Emma Ramsey. Their common ancestors are Jospeh Lockington and Jane Slight, my wife’s 3x great grandparents.

Edith married Ernest Northcote Morfitt on 27 Jun 1907 and a report of the ceremony was published in the Hull Daily Mail.

Hull Daily Mail - 27 June 1907.pngPRETTY WEDDING AT STONEFERRY

A very pretty wedding, in which Stoneferry seemed greatly interested, took place this afternoon at St Saviour’s Church, Wilmington. The bridal parties were Miss Edith Stephenson, only daughter of Mr and Mrs C Stephenson, 144, Cleveland Street, and Mr Ernest Northcote Morfitt, of King’s Mill, eldest son of Mr and Mrs J Morfitt.

A bright, fully choral service had been arranged, as the bride has been closely associated with music, and as a compliment Mr Alvan B Young, LLCM, presided at the organ.

The bride was attired in a white silk eolienne dress, which was trimmed with orange blossom and very delicate lace. She also wore a bridal veil of orange blossom, and carried a shower bouquet composed of sweet peas and carnations.

There were four bridesmaids – Miss May E Morfitt, Miss Beatrice Lee – dressed in cream eolienne with crinoline hats, and they carried shower bouquets. Miss Fanny Morfitt and Miss Smailes were dressed in white silk with Napoleon hats. They carried baskets of flowers. The bride was given away by her father, and the bridegroom was accompanied by Mr W E Smailes as best man.

The Rev E V Dunn, the vicar, who conducted the service, was assisted by the Rev H J Boon.

Both the bride and the bridegroom are greatly respected in Stoneferry, and the church was full of well wishers. At several of the houses bunting was out, and flags were flying. The bride is a music teacher, and has many pupils.

The chancel of the church and the altar were adorned with flowers. A reception, at which there were about 300 guests, was afterwards held at the Oddfellows’ Hall. Both the bride and the bridegroom were the recipients of many presents.

Edith and Ernest had one child – George Ernest, born on 12 March 1908.

Sadly the couple only had eleven years of married life before Edith passed away on 15 December 1918.

Ernest remarried about eight years later to Elsie M Tasker – the marriage is registered in the December quarter of 1926.