Burnley Express

Sunday’s Obituary – John Espley (1869-1945)

John Espley is my wife’s 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Joseph Booth Espley and Christiana Boyle. Their common ancestor is Martha Espley – my wife’s 2x great grandmother.

John was born on 5 May 1869 in Macclesfield, Cheshire.

In the 1891 census John was with his uncle & aunt Frederick Espley and Frances Espley in Biddulph, Staffordshire. He was working as an iron turner. By the time of the following census in 1901 John was living in Burnley, Lancashire working as a builders labourer.

On 7 December 1901 John married Sarah Booth at St Matthew the Apostle church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

Sarah was a young widow of 25. Her maiden name was Sarah Baines Turner. She had married Samuel Booth in the first quarter of 1897 in Burnley. Samuel died three years later. This left Sarah on her own with three children under three years old – Betty, Jane and Samuel.

By the time of the 1911 census John and Sarah had six children of their own but sadly two died in infancy. By now John was working in the water department of the Burnley Borough Council.

John was a conscientious employee for the water department and eventually retired from there in 1934. The Burnley Express of Saturday 5 May 1934 reported on his retirement (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

John Espley - Burnley Express 5 May 1934.png

THIRTY-THREE YEARS WITH WATER DEPARTMENT

After completing 33 years service with the Burnley Corporation Water Department, Mr. John Espley, of 14 Hawk Street, enters into a well-earned retirement today. Mr. Espley, who is 65 years of age, has served under three managers, and for over 20 years has been a foreman with the department.
He holds the proud record of never having been late for 32 years. One day, when he had been with the department about 12 months, he arrived five minutes late and was sent home for three days. He has never been late since! Mr. Espley is interested in gardening, with which he occupies much of his spare time.

John’s retirement lasted for eleven years before he died on 4 June 1945. He was buried three days later in Burnley cemetery.

The Burnley Express reported on his death on Saturday 9 June 1945.

John Espley - Burnley Express 9 June 1945.png

MR. JOHN ESPLEY

The death of Mr. John Espley (76) took place at his home, 81 Albert Street, Burnley, on Monday, after a short illness. Mr. Espley, a well-known Fulledge resident, was employed by the Burnley Corporation Water Department for about 33 years, being a foreman for about 20 years. He retired about 11 years ago. The funeral took place at the Burnley Cemetery on Thursday, preceded by a service in the Latter Day Saints’ Chapel, Rosegrove, with which he was connected. Elder John R. Moore and Elder W. Duckworth officiated. Arrangements: Mr. Joseph Harling, 29 Yorkshire Street.

Sarah lived for a further 13 months – she was buried on 29 July 1946 in Burnley Cemetery.

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Wedding Wednesday – Benjamin Gawthrop and Jane Hargreaves

Benjamin Gawthrop is my 1st cousin 3x removed. His parents are Benjamin Gawthrop and Elizabeth Eastwood. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley – my 3x great grandparents.

I have written previously about Benjamin herehere and here.

On 16 May 1895 Benjamin married Jane Hargreaves and the marriage was announced in the Burnley Express on 18 May 1895 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Benjamin Gawthrop & Jane Hargreaves - Burnley Express 18 May 1895.png

MARRIAGE OF A FORMER BURNLEY STUDENT – On Thursday the nuptials of Rev. Benjamin Gawthorpe and Miss Jane Hargreaves were celebrated at Ebenezer Chapel, Colne Road. Mr Gawthorpe, it will be remembered, was one of those young men who went out from Ebenezer Chapel to study for the Baptist pulpit, and secured a place as minister at Heaton Chapel, Newcastle-on-Tyne, where he now officiates. The bride has always been a good worker in connection with the above place, being a member of the chapel and Sunday school choirs; she was, besides, a teacher in the school, and was very much esteemed by her scholars. In the chapel were a large number of relatives and friends who wished the couple every success. The officiating ministers were the Rev. S C Allderidge and the Rev. J J Hargreaves. The best man was the Rev. W H Holdsworth, M.A., and the bridesmaids were the two sisters of the bride. The Rev. R Boothman, of Clitheroe, and the Revs. J Walker and W Smith, of Rawdon College, were also present. The bride was given away by her uncle, Mr Richard Smith. After the ceremony the “Wedding March” was played, and then all the guests, to the number of about 80, sat down to a repast, and then spent the rest of the day in a sociable manner. The couple are the resipients of a great many beautiful presents, among them being a very pretty music stand from the bridegroom’s uncle, Mr Gawthorpe, of Sabden. The honeymoon is being spent at Lytham.

Sunday’s Obituary – George Ernest Jackson and Elizabeth Ann Jackson (nee Gawthrop)

Elizabeth Ann Gawthrop is my 1st cousin 3x removed. Her parents are Israel Gawthrop  and Mary Ann Hargreaves. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley – my 3x great grandparents.

Elizabeth was born on 4 April 1864 at Higham, near Padiham, in Lancashire.

At the age of 25 she married George Ernest Jackson on 19 June 1889 at St Nicholas Church, Sabden, Lancashire.

George and Elizabeth had three children:-
Harry – born 18 November 1890
Florence Mary – born 20 May 1893
Ernest J – born 7 May 1897

George and Elizabeth lived in Padiham where George was a cotton manufacturer and owned a mill there. When George retired from the business they moved to Lytham St Annes, near Blackpool.

George passed away on 10 July 1933. The Burnley Express of 15 July 1933 carried a brief obituary (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

George Ernest Jackson - Burnley Express 15 July 1933.png

DIED IN RETIREMENT

FORMER PADIHAM MANUFACTURER

Formerly a cotton manufacturer in Padiham for about 22 years, the death occurred at his residence, “The Anchorage,” East Beach, Lytham St. Annes, last Tuesday night, of Mr. George Ernest Jackson. He was a native of Sabden, and was the managing director of the Sabden Calico Printing Company. At Padiham he owned the Industry and Enterprise Mills, and was well-known as a great lover of horses. Retiring 22 years ago, he went to Lytham, and was a member of the Lytham Conservative Club. He was a past president of the Lytham Subscription Bowling Club, and a past captain of Lytham Green Golf Club. Mr. Jackson is survived by a widow, two sons and a daughter.

Elizabeth moved to Ripon after the death of her husband. She died in January 1936 and the Burnley Express reported this on 25 January 1936 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Elizabeth A Jackson (nee Gawthrop) - Burnley Express 25 january 1936.png

DIED IN RIPON – Many people in Padiham will regret to learn of the death at her residence in Ripon of Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Jackson, widow of Mr. George Ernest Jackson, a former well known cotton manufacturer, of Enterprise Mills, Padiham. Mrs. Jackson, who was 70 years of age, had resided in Ripon about three years. She is survived by two sons and a daughter. The interment took place in the family vault in St. Cutherbert’s Churchyard, Lytham.

Wedding Wednesday – Ronald Clifford Brown and Eveline Dacre Crewdson

Eveline Dacre Crewdson is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are George Dacre Crewdson and Clara Shackleton. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane – my 3x great grandparents.

Eveline was born in 1925 – her birth is registered in the third quarter.

On 28 July 1945 Eveline married Ronald Brown at St James Church, Briercliife, Lancashire. Details of the wedding were announced in the Burnley Express on 4 August 1945 (taken from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Brown & Crewdson Wedding - Burnley Express 4 August 1945.png

BROWN – CREWDSON

The Rev A B Dex officiated at the wedding at St James’s Church, Briercliffe, last Saturday, of Miss Eveline Dacre Crewdson, daughter of Mrs and the late Mr George Dacre Crewdson, of 7, Church Street, Harle Syke, and Mr Ronald Clifford Brown, son of Mr and Mrs H Brown, of 9, York Avenue, Swinton, near Manchester.
Given away by her cousin, Mr Ernest Enright, the bride was attired in satin beaute with lace inset, and she carried a bouquet of variegated roses. She was attended by her friend, Miss Dorothy Howarth, of Warrington, and Miss Hazel Hatherley, of Burnley (cousin of the bridegroom), who wore pale pink brocade and carried muffs, with sprays of roses, and by little Miss Maureen Rorke (cousin of the bride), who wore mauve and carried a posy of sweet peas.
Mr George Brown (brother of the bridegroom) was best man, and Mr James Donald Crewdson (brother of the bride) and Pte. George Winstanley, of Marton, Cheshire, were groomsmen.
The organist was Mr Wilfred Nuttall, and the hymns, “The Voice that breathed o’er Eden,: and “Lead us Heavenly Father,” were rendered. The church was decorated with sweat peas, carnations and roses.
Following a reception at the Black Bull Hotel, Lanehead, the newly married couple left for the honeymoon at Blackpool, the bride travelling in a nigger brown coat and dress with green accessories, and hat and shoes to tone. The couple will reside at 9, York Avenue, Swinton.
Among the presents were gifts from the South View Manufacturing Company, Harle Syke, where the bride is employed and from Gardeners’ Diesel Engine Works, Peel Green, Manchester, where the bridegroom is employed.
The bride was formerly a member of St James’s Church choir and a Sunday school teacher. Her father, the late Mr George Crewdson, was well known in Burnley as a tenor vocalist.

Wedding Wednesday – Harold Moor and Edna Proudfoot

Edna Proudfoot is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Arthur Proudfoot and Ellen Ann Myers. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane, my 3x great grandparents.

Edna was born on 26 October 1910 in Burnley, Lancashire.

On 25 April 1933 Edna married Harold Moor at St. Paul’s Church, Nelson, Lancashire – a report of the wedding was published in the Burnley Express the following day.

Harold Moor & Edna Proudfoot wedding.png

Considerable interest was evinced in a pretty wedding which took place yesterday afternoon, in St Paul’s Church, Nelson. The contracting parties were Mr Harold Moor, youngest son of Mr Harold Moor, of 1 Bank Hall Terrace, Burnley, a member of the firm of Messrs T and J Moor, wholesale fruiterers, of Nelson, and Miss Edna Proudfoot, eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs Proudfoot, of 146 Hibson Road, Nelson. The ceremony was performed, in the presence of a large congregation, by the Rev W M V Gregory.

The bride, who was given away by her father, was prettily attired in a gown of fine lace over crepe suede trimmed in silk velvet. She wore a veil with a wreath of orange blossom and carried a bouquet of lilac. The bridesmaids were Miss Mary Proudfoot, Miss Jean Proudfoot and Miss Nancy Proudfoot (sisters of the bride), and Miss Eleanor Dyson (friend of the bride). They were dressed in Parma violet crapple crepe marocain, with chenille berets to tone. Their bouquets were composed of anemones. The bride’s mother wore a brown and du Barry crapple crepe marocain, and Mrs E A Smalley, of Accrington, sister of the bridegroom, was attired in nigger brown floral crepe de Chine. Both had bouquets of tea roses.

The duties of best man were discharged by Mr A Veevers, friend of the bridegroom, and Mr T Greenwood (friend of the bridegroom) and Mr E A Smalley, of Accrington (brother-in-law of the bridegroom), officiated as groomsmen. After the ceremony a reception was held at Oddie’s Cafe, Scotland Road, Nelson.

The bridegroom is well known in local amateur football, playing centre-forward for the Burnley Grammar School Old Boys, of which team the best man is the captain.

The bride’s gift to the bridegroom was a gold wristlet watch, and the bridegroom’s gift to the bride was a pearl necklace. Diamante brilliant clips were presented by the bridegroom to the bridesmaids. Among the presents was a case of fish eaters and servers from the staff of Messrs T and J Moor.

The honeymoon is being spent touring in the South.

Sunday’s Obituary – Tom Myers (1862-1945)

Tom Myers is the husband of my 1st cousin 3x removed, Mary Ellen Procter. Mary’s parents are William Procter and Nancy Stowell. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

Tom was born about 1862 in Burnley, Lancashire – his birth is registered in the June quarter of that year.

Tom and Mary Ellen were married on 22 April 1884 at St. Peter’s church in Burnley. They had at least seven children between 1885 and 1904.

In the census returns for 1891, 1901 and 1911 Tom’s occupation is described as “barber” or “hairdresser and tobacconist”.

Sadly Mary Ellen died at the relatively young age of 44 early in 1908.

Tom lived for another 37 years passing away on 30 August 1945. The following notice was published in the Burnley Express on 5 September 1945.

Tom Myers - Burnley Express 5 Sep 1945.png

Mr TOM MYERS

Mt Tom Myers, last of four brothers who did so much for the musical life of Burnley, was laid to rest in Burnley Cemetery on Monday. Mr Myers, who was 83, had been residing for the past few years at 294, Scotland Road, Nelson. He was a brother of the late Mr Fred Myers, who was one of the founders and conductors of the old Philharmonic Orchestra in Burnley which afterwards became the nucleus of the Municipal Orchestra.

Sunday’s Obituary – Dent Stowell (1882-1948)

Dent Stowell is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. I have written about Dent before, herehere and here.

Dent was born on 14 July 1882 in Burnley, Lancashire to parents Thomas Stowell and Ann Wroe. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff (my 4x great grandparents).

If you have read my previous posts you will know that Dent had an interesting life :-

  • he served in the Black Watch Regiment in South Africa in the Boer War and in France during WW1, being wounded more than once.
  • he had an unhappy first marriage but found love for a second time with Helen Gordon – however he was found guilty of bigamously marrying Helen in 1918, before finally marrying her legally in 1939.
  • he had eight children from his two marriages.
  • he lived in Canada and in the United States of America.

Dent passed away on 28 March 1948 and I recently discovered the following inquest report in the Burnley Express of 31 March 1948.

Dent Stowell - Inquest 31 March 1948.png

Man’s sudden death during night

“Death from natural causes” was the verdict recorded by the Burnley Deputy Coroner (Mr C Waddington) at an inquest on Monday on Dent Stowell (65), machine operator, of 89 Marlborough Street, who died on Sunday morning.

Mrs Helen Stowell said that her husband had served in the Boer and 1914-18 wars, and in the latter was wounded and badly gassed. His general health had not been good since 1918, but he had never had a serious illness. For the past four months he had complained of chest pains, but would not seek medical advice.

On Friday, the pains became worse, and on Saturday he said the pain felt like a lump in his chest. That evening she gave him a Seidlitz powder in warm water and, later, Indian Brandy in warm water, and they retired about 11.15pm. At 12.15am her husband got out of bed, and put the light out before returning.

Immediately he had got back into bed she heard strange noises coming from his throat, and, on putting on the light, found him struggling for breath. She helped him to sit up, but he collapsed in her arms. She ran out of the house and asked a passer-by to send for the police, who, on arrival, told her her husband had passed away.

Mr R O Davidson, consulting surgeon, said that he had conducted a post-mortem examination, and in his opinion death was due to cardiac failure, due to myocardial degeneration and coronary sclerosis.

After Dent’s death Helen moved to America to be with family who had emigrated there. She lived for another 36 years before passing away in 1984. Helen’s family brought her to England for burial alongside Dent and their son Percy in Burnley Cemetery, Lancashire.

Dent and Helen had thirty years together and I suspect could tell some tales about their experiences and adventures.