Burnley Express

Sunday’s Obituary – George Ernest Jackson and Elizabeth Ann Jackson (nee Gawthrop)

Elizabeth Ann Gawthrop is my 1st cousin 3x removed. Her parents are Israel Gawthrop  and Mary Ann Hargreaves. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley – my 3x great grandparents.

Elizabeth was born on 4 April 1864 at Higham, near Padiham, in Lancashire.

At the age of 25 she married George Ernest Jackson on 19 June 1889 at St Nicholas Church, Sabden, Lancashire.

George and Elizabeth had three children:-
Harry – born 18 November 1890
Florence Mary – born 20 May 1893
Ernest J – born 7 May 1897

George and Elizabeth lived in Padiham where George was a cotton manufacturer and owned a mill there. When George retired from the business they moved to Lytham St Annes, near Blackpool.

George passed away on 10 July 1933. The Burnley Express of 15 July 1933 carried a brief obituary (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

George Ernest Jackson - Burnley Express 15 July 1933.png

DIED IN RETIREMENT

FORMER PADIHAM MANUFACTURER

Formerly a cotton manufacturer in Padiham for about 22 years, the death occurred at his residence, “The Anchorage,” East Beach, Lytham St. Annes, last Tuesday night, of Mr. George Ernest Jackson. He was a native of Sabden, and was the managing director of the Sabden Calico Printing Company. At Padiham he owned the Industry and Enterprise Mills, and was well-known as a great lover of horses. Retiring 22 years ago, he went to Lytham, and was a member of the Lytham Conservative Club. He was a past president of the Lytham Subscription Bowling Club, and a past captain of Lytham Green Golf Club. Mr. Jackson is survived by a widow, two sons and a daughter.

Elizabeth moved to Ripon after the death of her husband. She died in January 1936 and the Burnley Express reported this on 25 January 1936 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Elizabeth A Jackson (nee Gawthrop) - Burnley Express 25 january 1936.png

DIED IN RIPON – Many people in Padiham will regret to learn of the death at her residence in Ripon of Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Jackson, widow of Mr. George Ernest Jackson, a former well known cotton manufacturer, of Enterprise Mills, Padiham. Mrs. Jackson, who was 70 years of age, had resided in Ripon about three years. She is survived by two sons and a daughter. The interment took place in the family vault in St. Cutherbert’s Churchyard, Lytham.

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Wedding Wednesday – Ronald Clifford Brown and Eveline Dacre Crewdson

Eveline Dacre Crewdson is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are George Dacre Crewdson and Clara Shackleton. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane – my 3x great grandparents.

Eveline was born in 1925 – her birth is registered in the third quarter.

On 28 July 1945 Eveline married Ronald Brown at St James Church, Briercliife, Lancashire. Details of the wedding were announced in the Burnley Express on 4 August 1945 (taken from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Brown & Crewdson Wedding - Burnley Express 4 August 1945.png

BROWN – CREWDSON

The Rev A B Dex officiated at the wedding at St James’s Church, Briercliffe, last Saturday, of Miss Eveline Dacre Crewdson, daughter of Mrs and the late Mr George Dacre Crewdson, of 7, Church Street, Harle Syke, and Mr Ronald Clifford Brown, son of Mr and Mrs H Brown, of 9, York Avenue, Swinton, near Manchester.
Given away by her cousin, Mr Ernest Enright, the bride was attired in satin beaute with lace inset, and she carried a bouquet of variegated roses. She was attended by her friend, Miss Dorothy Howarth, of Warrington, and Miss Hazel Hatherley, of Burnley (cousin of the bridegroom), who wore pale pink brocade and carried muffs, with sprays of roses, and by little Miss Maureen Rorke (cousin of the bride), who wore mauve and carried a posy of sweet peas.
Mr George Brown (brother of the bridegroom) was best man, and Mr James Donald Crewdson (brother of the bride) and Pte. George Winstanley, of Marton, Cheshire, were groomsmen.
The organist was Mr Wilfred Nuttall, and the hymns, “The Voice that breathed o’er Eden,: and “Lead us Heavenly Father,” were rendered. The church was decorated with sweat peas, carnations and roses.
Following a reception at the Black Bull Hotel, Lanehead, the newly married couple left for the honeymoon at Blackpool, the bride travelling in a nigger brown coat and dress with green accessories, and hat and shoes to tone. The couple will reside at 9, York Avenue, Swinton.
Among the presents were gifts from the South View Manufacturing Company, Harle Syke, where the bride is employed and from Gardeners’ Diesel Engine Works, Peel Green, Manchester, where the bridegroom is employed.
The bride was formerly a member of St James’s Church choir and a Sunday school teacher. Her father, the late Mr George Crewdson, was well known in Burnley as a tenor vocalist.

Wedding Wednesday – Harold Moor and Edna Proudfoot

Edna Proudfoot is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Arthur Proudfoot and Ellen Ann Myers. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane, my 3x great grandparents.

Edna was born on 26 October 1910 in Burnley, Lancashire.

On 25 April 1933 Edna married Harold Moor at St. Paul’s Church, Nelson, Lancashire – a report of the wedding was published in the Burnley Express the following day.

Harold Moor & Edna Proudfoot wedding.png

Considerable interest was evinced in a pretty wedding which took place yesterday afternoon, in St Paul’s Church, Nelson. The contracting parties were Mr Harold Moor, youngest son of Mr Harold Moor, of 1 Bank Hall Terrace, Burnley, a member of the firm of Messrs T and J Moor, wholesale fruiterers, of Nelson, and Miss Edna Proudfoot, eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs Proudfoot, of 146 Hibson Road, Nelson. The ceremony was performed, in the presence of a large congregation, by the Rev W M V Gregory.

The bride, who was given away by her father, was prettily attired in a gown of fine lace over crepe suede trimmed in silk velvet. She wore a veil with a wreath of orange blossom and carried a bouquet of lilac. The bridesmaids were Miss Mary Proudfoot, Miss Jean Proudfoot and Miss Nancy Proudfoot (sisters of the bride), and Miss Eleanor Dyson (friend of the bride). They were dressed in Parma violet crapple crepe marocain, with chenille berets to tone. Their bouquets were composed of anemones. The bride’s mother wore a brown and du Barry crapple crepe marocain, and Mrs E A Smalley, of Accrington, sister of the bridegroom, was attired in nigger brown floral crepe de Chine. Both had bouquets of tea roses.

The duties of best man were discharged by Mr A Veevers, friend of the bridegroom, and Mr T Greenwood (friend of the bridegroom) and Mr E A Smalley, of Accrington (brother-in-law of the bridegroom), officiated as groomsmen. After the ceremony a reception was held at Oddie’s Cafe, Scotland Road, Nelson.

The bridegroom is well known in local amateur football, playing centre-forward for the Burnley Grammar School Old Boys, of which team the best man is the captain.

The bride’s gift to the bridegroom was a gold wristlet watch, and the bridegroom’s gift to the bride was a pearl necklace. Diamante brilliant clips were presented by the bridegroom to the bridesmaids. Among the presents was a case of fish eaters and servers from the staff of Messrs T and J Moor.

The honeymoon is being spent touring in the South.

Sunday’s Obituary – Tom Myers (1862-1945)

Tom Myers is the husband of my 1st cousin 3x removed, Mary Ellen Procter. Mary’s parents are William Procter and Nancy Stowell. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

Tom was born about 1862 in Burnley, Lancashire – his birth is registered in the June quarter of that year.

Tom and Mary Ellen were married on 22 April 1884 at St. Peter’s church in Burnley. They had at least seven children between 1885 and 1904.

In the census returns for 1891, 1901 and 1911 Tom’s occupation is described as “barber” or “hairdresser and tobacconist”.

Sadly Mary Ellen died at the relatively young age of 44 early in 1908.

Tom lived for another 37 years passing away on 30 August 1945. The following notice was published in the Burnley Express on 5 September 1945.

Tom Myers - Burnley Express 5 Sep 1945.png

Mr TOM MYERS

Mt Tom Myers, last of four brothers who did so much for the musical life of Burnley, was laid to rest in Burnley Cemetery on Monday. Mr Myers, who was 83, had been residing for the past few years at 294, Scotland Road, Nelson. He was a brother of the late Mr Fred Myers, who was one of the founders and conductors of the old Philharmonic Orchestra in Burnley which afterwards became the nucleus of the Municipal Orchestra.

Sunday’s Obituary – Dent Stowell (1882-1948)

Dent Stowell is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. I have written about Dent before, herehere and here.

Dent was born on 14 July 1882 in Burnley, Lancashire to parents Thomas Stowell and Ann Wroe. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff (my 4x great grandparents).

If you have read my previous posts you will know that Dent had an interesting life :-

  • he served in the Black Watch Regiment in South Africa in the Boer War and in France during WW1, being wounded more than once.
  • he had an unhappy first marriage but found love for a second time with Helen Gordon – however he was found guilty of bigamously marrying Helen in 1918, before finally marrying her legally in 1939.
  • he had eight children from his two marriages.
  • he lived in Canada and in the United States of America.

Dent passed away on 28 March 1948 and I recently discovered the following inquest report in the Burnley Express of 31 March 1948.

Dent Stowell - Inquest 31 March 1948.png

Man’s sudden death during night

“Death from natural causes” was the verdict recorded by the Burnley Deputy Coroner (Mr C Waddington) at an inquest on Monday on Dent Stowell (65), machine operator, of 89 Marlborough Street, who died on Sunday morning.

Mrs Helen Stowell said that her husband had served in the Boer and 1914-18 wars, and in the latter was wounded and badly gassed. His general health had not been good since 1918, but he had never had a serious illness. For the past four months he had complained of chest pains, but would not seek medical advice.

On Friday, the pains became worse, and on Saturday he said the pain felt like a lump in his chest. That evening she gave him a Seidlitz powder in warm water and, later, Indian Brandy in warm water, and they retired about 11.15pm. At 12.15am her husband got out of bed, and put the light out before returning.

Immediately he had got back into bed she heard strange noises coming from his throat, and, on putting on the light, found him struggling for breath. She helped him to sit up, but he collapsed in her arms. She ran out of the house and asked a passer-by to send for the police, who, on arrival, told her her husband had passed away.

Mr R O Davidson, consulting surgeon, said that he had conducted a post-mortem examination, and in his opinion death was due to cardiac failure, due to myocardial degeneration and coronary sclerosis.

After Dent’s death Helen moved to America to be with family who had emigrated there. She lived for another 36 years before passing away in 1984. Helen’s family brought her to England for burial alongside Dent and their son Percy in Burnley Cemetery, Lancashire.

Dent and Helen had thirty years together and I suspect could tell some tales about their experiences and adventures.

Wedding Wednesday – Alban Arthur Birch and Connie Jackson

Alban Arthur Birch is my wife’s 3rd cousin. His parents are Arthur Birch and Sarah Fitzgerald. Their common ancestor is Martha Espley, my wife’s 2x great grandmother.

Alban was born in Burnley, Lancashire on 5 August 1916. He was the only child of Arthur and Sarah Birch.

On Alban’s 23rd birthday he married Connie Jackson at St James Church, Briercliffe, Lancashire.

The wedding was reported in the Burnley Express on 12 August 1939.

Burnley Express 12 Aug 1939.png

Briercliffe St. James’s Church was the scene of a pretty wedding last Saturday morning between Mr Alban Arthur Birch, son of Mr and Mrs A Birch, of 200, Burnley Road, Accrington, and Miss Connie Jackson, only daughter of Mr and Mrs T S Jackson, of 12, Burnley Road, Briercliffe. The bride, who was given away by her father, was charmingly attired in a gown of white satin with veil of embroidered net held in place by orange blossom. She carried a bouquet of pink roses and lillies of the valley. She was attended by a matron of honour, Mrs M Jones, of London, friend of the bride, and a bridesmaid, Miss Gwen Dewhurst, cousin of the bride, who wore dresses of lavender taffeta with head-dresses and shoes to tone, and carried bouquets of pink carnations. The best man was Mr James Hargreaves, friend of the bridegroom, while Mr Eliot Andrews and Mr B Spencer (friends of the bridegroom) were groomsmen. Mr G Dewhurst was the usher. The ceremony was performed by the Rev A B Dex, MA, who also rendered appropriate organ music. A reception luncheon was held at Storey’s Cafe, and afterwards the newly-wedded pair left for a honeymoon in Scotland, the bride travelling in a moss green coat with black accessories. Among numerous presents received were some from the staff of W H Dean and Son, where the bride and bridegroom are employed. Mr and Mrs Birch will reside at 1, Bedfordshire Avenue, Burnley.

Black Sheep Sunday – Dent Stowell (1882-1948) – part 2

Black Sheep Sunday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Black Sheep Sunday simply create a post with the main focus being an ancestor with a “shaded past.”

This is the second part of a three blog post series about Dent Stowell, my 2nd cousin 3x removed. Here’s a link to part one from last week – Military Monday

So to recap we left the story when Dent had been demobbed following the end of WW1.

I was then able to find Dent in the 1939 Register, completed at the start of WW2. He is living at 1 Grove Street, Burnley, Lancashire with his wife Helen.

Now then this is where my problem starts – in 1907 he was married to Rose Ann Cairns. Now here he is living with Helen. So what has happened over the twenty years since he was demobbed.

I began by searching the available records on http://www.ancestry.co.uk and http://www.findmypast.co.uk.

I got several results. There was an entry in the UK incoming passenger lists and some newspaper articles.

Let’s start with one of the newspaper articles – they are mostly the same. This transcript is from the Burnley Express of 22 April 1933.

Burnley Express 22 Apr 1933WARTIME ROMANCE SHATTERED

ALLEGED BIGAMY SEUQEL TO                      SOLDIERS MARRIAGE

BURNLEY MOTOR DRIVER’S AMAZING COURT REVELATIONS

Remarkable allegations that during his leaves from France during the war, in which he was wounded thrice, his wife “chased him back before his time was up, told him she did not want to see him again, and wished the Germans would kill him next time out”, were made by an ex-Service man who appeared before the magistrates in the Burnley Police Court, last Wednesday, on a charge of alleged bigamy.

The accused, Dent Stowell (50), described as a motor driver, and living at 15 Tunnel Street, Burnley, was stated to have been three times wounded while serving in France during the war with the famous Scottish regiment, the Black Watch. In a statement at the close of the evidence against him, Stowell said the Burnley woman to whom he was originally married “chased him back” every time he came home on leave from France, telling him she “did not want to see him again,” and wishing the Germans “would kill him next time out.”

Committed for Trial

Stowell, who was committed to Manchester Assizes for trial, was alleged to have married Helen Gordon, at Carlisle Parish Church, on January 27th, 1918, while his wife, a Burnley woman, whom he had married at St Matthew’s Church, Burnley, on January 5th, 1907, was still alive. It was stated that there were three surviving children of the Burnley marriage, and that Stowell had four children by the other woman.

Mr E S Smith, of the Town Clerk’s Department, appearing for the prosecution, said the alleged bigamy was a “war story.” The Burnley marriage was witnessed by William Gilbert and his wife, Anastasia Gilbert, then residing at Fielden Street, Burnley. After the marriage the couple went to live at the home of the husband’s sister, Mrs Brotherton, St. Matthew Street. Afterwards they lived at various Burnley addresses, and ultimately at 2 Zion Street, where Mrs Stowell resided. Prisoner at the outbreak of war was a reservist in the Black Watch Regiment, and he was sent to Perth, Scotland, to join up there. He was drafted to France, and in October, 1914, came home wounded for the first time. He lived with his wife at Burnley while at home then, and also on coming home on leave on several occasions. He was again wounded more than once, and on the last occasion was transferred, after recovery, to the Mechanical Transport Section, and stationed in London. After the Armistice he returned to his wife in Burnley, and later was again with his regiment. Then, owing to his being missing from his depot, his wife’s Army allowance was stopped for a time. He returned to his regiment , and his wife again received her payments.

Sailed for Canada

About Easter, 1919 (Mr Smith continued), Mrs Stowell had a letter from him, stating that he was expecting his discharge from the Army. But he did not return home, and she found that he had sailed for Canada. It was discovered that prior to his coming home for the last time to his wife in Burnley he had gone through a form of marriage at Carlisle, the ceremony taking place at the Parish Church there on January 27th, 1918. He was then fully aware that his lawful wife was alive.

Mrs Rose Ann Stowell, of 2 Zion Street, Burnley, stated that she was living there with her son. She spoke to having married accused at St Matthews Church, Burnley, on the date alleged, and she identified a certificate produced as being that of the marriage. Her maiden name was Cairns. They first lived with her husband’s sister at 76 St. Matthew Street. There were three children of the marriage alive, the youngest being now 21. They lived together happily until the commencement of the war, when he was sent to Perth to join his regiment, the Black Watch. He afterwards went to France and was wounded three times, on each occasion coming to their home in Burnley, and being transferred after his last wound to London. He came home on Armistice night and stayed two or three days. About Christmas that year her allowance was stopped by the Army authorities owing to accused’s absence for a time from his regiment. During that period, however, she received letters from him through his depot, though he was not there.

Husband’s Allegations

About Easter, 1919 (witness went on), she received a letter from prisoner stating that he was expecting to be discharged. He did not, however come home.

Have you seen him since? – Not till now.
Did you know where he had gone? – He had gone to Canada.
How did you know that? – He wrote to me for about 12 months.

Witness denied a suggestion by prisoner that the last time he was home from the Army she was running about public houses.

Prisoner: Didn’t you tell me to get back to my regiment and say that you didn’t want to see me any more alive? – and didn’t I say, “You never will see me again”? – as you never have done.

Witness: That is not the case.

Witness agreed that prisoner sent money to her and the children for the first 12 months after he went to Canada.

Prisoner: Didn’t I ask you if you would send the children to me, I would book their passages? – Yes

You would not let them come? – Why should I? They were my children.

Witness denied that she went drinking with the money prisoner sent her. She also denied a suggestion by the prisoner that she was living with a man.

Mrs Ann Anastasia Gilbert, widow, 224 Lowerhouse Lane, stated that she was present along with her husband, now dead, as a witness at prisoner’s marriage in St Matthew’s Church in 1907. On March 3rd this year she accompanied a detective officer to the Superintendent Registrar’s Office, Nicholas Street, and identified the original entry of the marriage, a copy of which was now produced.

Met in 1917

Helen Gordon, whom prisoner was alleged to have bigamously married, stated that she was now living with Stowell at 15 Tunnel Street, Burnley. She had four children, of whom he was the father.

In 1917 (winess proceeded) she was working on munitions at Carlisle, and in June of that year she met Stowell. He was then a soldier in the Black Watch, and he told her he was a single man of Scottish nationality.

Did he ask you to keep company with him? – Yes.

They went through the form of marriage at Carlisle Parish Church on January 27th, 1918. (Witness identified a certificate produced.)

Stowell afterwards went to France, and she (witness) joined the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps and was sent to London. There she was joined later by Stowell on his being stationed in London.

In April, 1919, on his being discharged from the Army, Stowell (witness continued) sailed for Canada. She did not accompany him then, but went about three months afterwards. They lived in Canada about nine months, and then went to Detroit, United States, remaining there till January 26th, this year. She was with prisoner all that time. They returned to England on the instructions of the American emigration authorities, arriving in England on February 9th. They lived together at 194, Scalegate Road, Carlisle, till they came to Burnley.

“Drinking and Fighting”

Detective Sergeant Pullen said a warrant was issued for Stowell’s arrest on April 13th. He saw him on Tuesday this week at 15 Tunnel Street, where he was residing with his sister. He told him he had a warrant for his arrest, and Stowell replied, “Sure, when will it be tried?” When charged at the police office, he replied, “I have nothing to say.”

When asked, in the usual form, if he had anything to say, Stowell, from the dock, said: “I lived with her eight years after marriage, and was parted twice in that eight years through drinking and fighting. Every time I came on leave I had to go back before my time was up. She chased me back. I thought it impossible to live with her after the war, because she was telling me she did not want to see me again in life, and wishing the Germans would kill me next time out. She told my sister she was happy with the man she was living with now, and she did not want me back, and I don’t intend to go back.”

Prisoner was asked by the chairman of the magistrates (the Mayor) if he had been living happily with the other woman. He replied that he done so for 14 years.

Stowell was, as stated, committed for trial at Manchester Assizes. He applied for, and was allowed, bail, in his surety of £10, and another of the same amount. A friend of accused came forward as surety, and he was released.

Look out for the third and final instalment next week.