John Gawthrop

Workday Wednesday – George Robert Newman (1881-1977)

Eva Gawthrop is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are John Thomas Gawthrop and Annie Elizabeth Salisbury. Our common ancestors are John Gawthrop and Sarah Brown – my 4x great grandparents.

Eva was born on 9 May 1899 in Barrow in Furness, Lancashire.

In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2, Eva was living with her sister May Kirkby and family at Holker Street, Barrow in Furness. Eva was working as an “engine tracer (shipping)”. I had to look up the occupation to find out a bit more. The job involved tracing plans for the navy ships which were drawn up by the draughtsmen then photographed onto blueprints for building them. You had to be very accurate as you weren’t allowed to rub out any mistakes. You had a long period of training and supervision (a three year apprenticeship) and a great deal of practice before being allowed to work unsupervised.

Sometime in the March quarter of 1950 Eva married George Robert Newman in Barrow in Furness.

George Robert was a widower. He was born in 1881 and had married Nellie Key in 1908. They had one son, Leslie born in 1914. Nellie died at the age of 66 on18 January 1949.

So Eva and George Robert were a mature couple when they married. In fact George Robert had a long career as a Police officer in Hull, Yorkshire. At the time of his marriage to Eva her had been retired for almost 17 years. I found the following article in the Hull Daily Mail of Thursday 31 August 1933 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Hull Daily Mail - 31 Aug 1933.png

LEAVING HULL POLICE

Officer Who Served in Every Division

Today Hull bids an official farewell to one of its police chiefs, Superintendent George Robert Newman, who has been in the Force for nearly 29 years, and now retires on pension.
Mr Newman can lay claim to having served in each of the police divisions of the city at least once, and in some twice. Further, he has served under four Chief Constables: Major P. Malcolm, Mr George Morley, the late Captain Woods, and the present Chief Constable, Mr T. E. Howden.
Superintendent Newman joined the force in November, 1904, and after being at Wincolmlee station for about two years he was transferred to the Fire Brigade station. Here he remained for 14 years. In 1921 he was promoted to sergeant and transferred to the Central Division as a section sergeant.
In 1923 he again received promotion, this time to station sergeant, and took up duty at Norfolk Street station until 1925, when he was made an inspector and transferred to Wincolmlee. After a year he was again moved to the Central Station, remaining for two years.

IN CHARGE OF DIVISION
In 1928 he was raised to the rank of Chief Inspector, and was placed in charge of Crowle Street until 1929. He was then moved to Gordon Street, and placed in charge of the division. In the same year Mr Newman was appointed as Superintendent, and remained in charge of West Hull until his retirement.
Actually Superintendent Newman has served for 28 years and 9 months. During the past three years he has undertaken prosecutions for the police twice per week.
He is president of the International Police Association and the Police Temperance Society, while he is also interested in the Temporary Home for young people in Hull.
Mr Newman, who has earned the respect of everyone except lawbreakers, will remain in Hull after his retirement.

George Robert passed away at the age of 96 on 15 November 1977. Eva died 15 months later on 21 February 1979 at the age of 79.

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Military Monday – Joseph Thomas Greenwood (1906-1945)

Joseph Thomas Greenwood is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Watson Greenwood and Margaret Alice Gawthrop. Our common ancestors are John Gawthrop and Sarah Brown (my 4x great grandparents).

Joseph was born on 28 March 1906 in Keighley, West Yorkshire. He was the third of five sons for Watson and Margaret. The others were:-

John Willie – 5 April 1898
Sydney – 26 May 1901
Ernest Pickles – 1 August 1907
Fred – 12 February 1909

At some point, I believe in the early 1930’s Watson and Margaret moved to Kent together with some of the boys. In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2 Watson is listed as a “poultry farmer”. The only son still at home was Fred – he was a soldier, home on leave.

Joseph married Dorothy Edna Clarke sometime in the June quarter of 1935. In the 1939 Register Joseph is listed as a “milk roundsman”.

I recently discovered that Joseph was a Corporal with Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. His service number was 1274826. I don’t have any other information about his war service.

While trying to fill in some gaps in my family history tree I cam across the following brief newspaper story from the Nottingham Journal of Thursday 8 November 1945 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Joseph Thomas Greenwood - Nottingham Journal 8 Nov 1945.png

On his first day back at work after demobilisation from the R.A.F., Joseph Thomas Greenwood (39), married, of Ashford, Kent, collapsed at the wheel of his bus on Wednesday and died within a few moments.

Joseph has an entry on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWG) website. This tells me that he is buried at Charing (Kent County) Crematorium and commemorated on the WW2 memorial there.

In 1950 Dorothy married Leslie John Ronald Potticary in Aldershot, Hampshire.

Sundays Obituary – Susannah Gawthrop (1830-1907)

Susannah Gawthrop (nee Benson) is the wife of my 2nd great grand uncle. In other words she married a brother of my 2x great grandmother (Ellen Gawthrop)

Susannah Benson was born on 16 October 1830 in Cowling, West Yorkshire.

Sometime in the September quarter of 1852  Susannah married Joseph Gawthrop. Over the next twenty years Joseph and Susannah had eight children.

Their first child, John, became a well known Wesleyan Methodist minister. I have written about John before – here and here.

Joseph and Susannah lived in Cowling all their lives. Joseph’s occupation in the census returns from 1861 to 1891 was a farmer at Green Syke, Cowling.

On 25 April 1900 Joseph passed away and was buried three days later at Holy Trinity Church, Cowling.

According to the census return for 1901 Susannah was still living at Green Syke with her youngest son Alfred and his family – Alfred now appears to be running the farm.

Very sadly tragedy struck on Friday 22 November 1907. The Bradford Daily Telegraph published the following story on 25 November.

Susannah Gawthrop (Benson) - Bradford Daily Telegraph 25 November 1907.png

Bradford Daily Telegraph taken from British Newspaper Archives

BURNING FATALITY AT COWLING

OLD LADY’S SAD DEATH

On Friday night Mrs Susannah Gawthrop, of Cowling, was reading a newspaper by candle light, when the paper caught fire.

In a few minutes she was in flames, and sustained severe injuries, being badly burned about the neck, face and arms. Death took place on Saturday night.

Mrs Gawthrop who was in her 76th year, was the mother of the Rev. John Gawthrop, a popular Wesleyan minister at Huntingdon.

The tragic incident has caused quite a sensation in the village, and general sympathy has been extended to the relatives on all hands.

A Coroners Inquest was held at the Cowling Liberal Club on 25 November 1907. The verdict was that death was caused “By misadventure, set fire to her clothing causing death by shock the next day”.

Susannah Gawthrop - Inquest 25 November 1907.jpg

Coroners Notebooks 1852-1909 taken from http://www.ancestry.co.uk

Susannah was buried on 28 November 1907 at Holy Trinity Church, Cowling.

Mining Disaster – James Ernest Gawthrop (1887-1928)

I was recently trawling through the newspaper archives on Find My Past and came across the article below from the Leeds Intelligencer of 17 January 1928.

Leeds Intelligencer 7 January 1928

Leeds Intelligencer
7 January 1928

I soon realised that this looked suspiciously like my relative James Ernest Gawthrop, my 2nd cousin 3x removed. His parents were Thomas Gawthrop and Christiana Hey. Our common ancestors were John Gawthrop and Sarah Brown, my 4x great grandparents.

I already had a bit of information about James – I know for example that he was born in 1887 – his birth is registered in Q3 in Keighley, West Yorkshire. As far as I can tell James was the youngest of nine children.

In the 1901 census, at the age of 13 James was working as a “worsted spinner and doffer”.

Sometime in the summer of 1909 James married Annie Morris in Halifax.

In the 1911 census James and Annie are living in Keighley with their son Benjamin (born in 1910) and James is employed as a “mohair warehouseman”.

They had two more children – Nellie in 1912 and Lewis in 1914. I assume that James served in WW1 but I can’t find any remaining military records for him on either Ancestry or Find My Past.

I already knew that James died in 1928 and his death was registered in Q1 in Hemsworth, Yorkshire. This is supported by the newspaper article in terms of date and location.

However there is one obvious discrepancy – the newspaper report says that “Gawthrop leaves a widow and eight children”. That clearly doesn’t agree with the information I already had. So what’s going on? I decided to do a bit more digging.

I found a death record for Annie Gawthrop registered in Keighley in Q2 of 1914. That was the same quarter that the birth of Lewis was registered. Had Annie died in child birth? That’s certainly a possibility.

Next I found another marriage for James E Gawthrop – this time to Maud M Morris registered in Q2 1919 in Halifax. OK, same surname as Annie and same location as the marriage to Annie. Is this just a coincidence? A bit more digging required I think.

Searching the 1891 and 1901 census returns for Halifax and things started to look a bit clearer.

Below is the 1901 census clearly showing Annie Morris (14) and Maud M Morris (10) – sisters. Interestingly there are two other siblings called Nellie and Lewis – the same names that James and Annie gave two of their children. Their other son Benjamin was probably named after James’s grandfather Benjamin Gawthrop.

Morris Census - 1901

So I am as confident as I can be that I now understand what happened here.  James married his sister-in-law.

James and Maud it seems had five children between 1919 and 1925, all registered in Barnsley, South Yorkshire:-

Margaret and Hilda – December 1919
Doreen – March 1921
Betty – March 1923
Ada – June 1925

After James died on 3 January 1928 Maud Mary married William Martin sometime in Q4 1928, this marriage is registered in Barnsley. There is a death record for Maud M Martin registered in Halifax in Q2 1957.

So without any certificates I can’t confirm any of this but it makes for an interesting story anyway.

I suspect that after Annie died in 1914 maybe James was called up for service in WW1. Perhaps Benjamin, Nellie and Lewis went to live with Annie’s parents in Halifax while James was away. When James came back home romance blossomed between him and Maud Mary. The rest as they say is history!!

Military Monday – Jack Gawthrop (1899-1918)

Jack Gawthrop is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Benjamin Gawthrop and Emily Ann Thurlow. Our common ancestors are John Gawthrop and Sarah Brown, my 4x great grandparents.

Jack was born about 1899 – his birth is registered at Hendon, Middlesex in the March quarter of that year.

Unfortunately I haven’t been able to find any remaining records of Jack’s military service either on http://www.ancestry.co.uk or http://www.findmypast.co.uk. I did find some details on http://www.forces-war-records.co.uk and on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website, http://www.cwgc.org.

I know that Jack served as a Private in the 2nd Battalion of the Prince of Wales’s Own West Yorkshire Regiment. His service number was 52976.

Jack died of wounds on 2 April 1918 serving in France and Flanders and he is buried at Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension.

The following information is from the CWGC website.

For much of the First World War, Abbeville was headquarters of the Commonwealth lines of communication and No.3 BRCS, No.5 and No.2 Stationary Hospitals were stationed there variously from October 1914 to January 1920. The communal cemetery was used for burials from November 1914 to September 1916, the earliest being made among the French military graves. The extension was begun in September 1916.



During the early part of the Second World War, Abbeville was a major operational aerodrome, but the town fell to the Germans at the end of May 1940. On 4 June, an attempt was made by the 51st Division, in conjunction with the French, to break the German bridgehead, but without success. Towards the end of 1943, eight large ski shaped buildings appeared near Abbeville. These proved to be storage units for flying bomb components and they were heavily bombed by Commonwealth air forces. Abbeville was retaken on 4 September 1944 by Canadian and Polish units.



Abbeville Communal Cemetery contains 774 Commonwealth burials of First World War and 30 from the Second. The Extension contains 1,754 First World War burials and 348 from the Second.



The Commonwealth sections of both cemetery and extension were designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension

Sunday’s Obituary – John Gawthrop (1853-1924)

I first wrote about John Gawthrop last October.  He is my 1st cousin 2x removed.

John became a Wesleyan Minister and since last October I discovered that the Methodist archives are held at the John Ryland’s University Library in Manchester.  I did some research about the material held at the library.  Unfortunately there are no records of John’s sermons or any other personal papers.

However I was able to access his entry in the Methodist Who’s Who.  I was also able to get a list of all the places he served as a minister from something called the Hill’s Arrangements.  Finally I was able to obtain a copy of his obituary from the 1924 Methodist Conference minutes.

The library have strict rules about using the material from the archives.  Whilst I was permitted to photograph the documents I am not allowed to publish or share them.  I can however transcribe the documents.

According to the Hill’s Arrangements published in 1922 show that John began his ministry in 1886 and finished in 1922.  Here is the list of all the places he worked.

Year Place Length of time
1886 Halifax 3 years
1889 Bedford 3 years
1892 Coventry 3 years
1895 Louth 3 years
1898 Leeds Mission 1 year
1899 Kirkby Stephen 4 years
1903 Huntingdonshire Misc. 4 years
1907 Louth 3 years
1910 Gainsborough 3 years
1913 Gloucester 6 years
1919 Bristol 3 years
1922 Huntingdonshire Misc.

The John Ryland’s library have a 1914 copy of the Methodist Who’s Who and I was able to photograph the entry for John Gawthrop.  I also found the 1912 Who’s Who at www.archive.org which I was able to download as a PDF document.

John died on 19 May 1924 and his obituary is recorded in the minutes of the Methodist Conference held later that year.

Obituary

John Gawthrop: born at Cowling in Yorkshire in 1853.  His conversion filled him with an intense love for every kind of Christian evangelism.  He became a local preacher, and for six years served as a Lay Evangelist.  He was accepted as a Candidate, and after a term at Headingley College entered the Ministry in 1886.  He served six years as District Evangelist, and throughout his life spent himself utterly in the work of saving souls.  His name is held dear by very many in all parts of the country whom he led to Christ.  In 1922 he was obliged to retire through ill-health to Great Paxton, near St. Neots.  He was unable to preach, but loved God’s house greatly.  His light burned and shone even in his affliction.  The last months were spent in much pain till on May 19, 1924, he passed home in the seventy-second year of his age and the thirty-eighth of his ministry.

I am glad that I have been able to find out a bit more about John and to share it with you.

Amanuensis Monday – Preacher John Gawthrop

Religion in the village of Cowling, West Yorkshire is likely to be the subject of a future post.   However it provides me with something to write about for Amanuensis Monday this week.   My Dawson ancestry is firmly rooted in Cowling.   My 2xgreat grandfather, John Dawson married Ellen Gawthrop on 8th April 1844 in the Parish Church of Kildwick.

So I am connected to John Gawthrop by marriage. He is my 1st cousin 3x removed.

John was born c1853 and he married Elizabeth Thornton in 1890.   As far as I have been able to determine they had at least two children – Elsie and John.

On the 1871 census John was living with his parents and working as a weaver.   In 1881 he was still with his parents but his occupation had changed to a local mission preacher.   By 1891 John was away doing mission work and he and Elizabeth are shown as visitors at an address in Gravenhurst, Bedfordshire.   His occupation is shown as Wesleyan Minister. In 1901 John, Elizabeth and their two children were living in Kirkby Stephen, Cumberland.

I guess it’s a sign of how much they moved about the country that Elsie was born c1892 in Northampton and John was born c1896 in Foleshill, Warwickshire.

OK, that just about sets the scene!

John became active as a preacher during the period known as Revivalism. These revivial services were well attended and John was a regular and popular preacher at the Ickornshaw Chapel.   This article refers to John as:-

a typical product of the revivalist era and whose unorthodox methods and powerful personality made him one of the most successful mission workers of his day.   He gained a high place in the Wesleyan ministry, conducting several large missions in various cities and serving as pastor of important churches throughout the country”.

This article from the Cumberland & Westmorland Herald of November 2000 includes a look back to 100 years ago and tells the story of John speaking in Kirkby Stephen and complaining that “there were no young men in the Wesleyan societies.   At Dent Head, Blencarn and Milburn, where he had just held missions, there was not a single young man and scarcely a young woman to be seen.   It was a shame that the devil should have the cream of the young people”.

I get the impression that John was a bit of firebrand and I would love to be able to get copies of some of his sermons if they still exist.   Writing this post has motivated me to see if the Methodist Church have any records remaining of John Gawthrop and his work.   So I may be talking about him again if I am successful.