Thomas Buckley

Black Sheep Sunday – Charles Cantwell & Edna May Cantwell (nee Buckley)

Edna May Buckley is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Ramsden Buckley and Emma Elliott. Our common ancestors are Thomas Buckley and Henrietta Mason – my 3x great grandparents.

Edna May was born in Keighley, West Yorkshire on 7 November 1904. She was the last of six children. In the 1911 census the family were living at 16 Hainworth Lane, Keighley.

Sometime in the second quarter of 1923 Edna May married Charles Cantwell. Charles was born on 8 August 1903 and was also from Keighley.

Before they were married Charles had been in trouble with the police more than once.

In 1918 he appeared in court along with four other young men. They were charged with stealing a cap and a pack of cards, valued at 3s 6d, from the Keighley Bowling Club on 13 December. All five pleaded guilty and Charles was fined ten shillings.

Less than three years into their marriage things were not going well. The following report is from the Leeds Mercury of 27 February 1926.

Charles Cantwell - Leeds Mercury 27 February 1926.png

KEIGHLEY: Red Hot Poker Attack

Alleged to have thrown hot tea over his wife, struck her with a red hot poker, blackened her eyes, and threatened her with a razor, Charles Cantwell, labourer, of Bogthorne, Oakworth, at Keighley yesterday was ordered to pay 20s a week on a separation order.

At the time of the 1939 Register in September that year Charles and Edna May are still together and living at 56 Woodhouse Grove, Keighley. Charles is working as a “scrap iron dealer”

Four and a half months later both Charles and Edna May appear in the Yorkshire Evening Post of 13 February 1940.

Charles Cantwell - YEP 13 February 1940.png

CHASE & FIGHT IN THE BLACKOUT

KEIGHLEY CONSTABLE COMMENDED

Gaol for Man who Stole from Cafe

Charles Cantwell (34), general dealer, Woodhouse Grove, Keighley, was sent to prison for a total of six months when he was charged at Keighley today with stealing knives and forks from Ramsden’s Cafe, and with assaulting Police constable Lodge in the execution of his duty.
His wife, Edna M Cantwell, who was also charged with the theft, was fined £1 in this case, and a further £1 on a charge of obstructing the police.
Richard A Robinson (28), hairdresser, Linnet Street, Keighley, was jointly charged with the theft, but the case against him was dismissed.
Defendants pleaded not guilty.
The Mayor asked that the work of Police constable Lodge in the case be brought to the notice of the proper authority.
Superintendent Atkinson said that about10.30pm on February 1 the defendants went to the cafe and had supper. When they left, a waitress missed three knives and forks, a sugar basin, and a bottle of tomato ketchup from the table. Police constable Lodge saw defendants leave the cafe. Hearing something rattling in Charles Cantwell’s pocket the officer asked him what he had there. Cantwell ran down High Street towards the cross.
Giving chase the officer caught Cantwell in Church Street, where, it was alleged, Cantwell took a bottle of ketchup from his raincoat pocket, struck the constable on the left arm with it, and then threw it away. There was a struggle and both fell. When they got up Cantwell took something else from his pocket and threw it away and the constable heard the sound of breaking crockery. Cantwell then struck and kicked the constable, causing him to lose his hold.
Again Cantwell bolted and again the constable caught him, this time in Low Street. There was another struggle and Mrs Cantwell pulled the constable’s cape over his head and tried to free her husband.
Eventually the constable managed to blow his whistle and it was not until then that Cantwell gave up struggling. The wife, it is alleged, was obstructing the constable all the way. Later a broken sugar basin, Cantwell’s hat, a fork, and a bottle of tomato ketchup were found in the street.
Police constable Lodge said Cantwell had some drink, but he was not drunk.
Answering Mr H Wall (Turner and Wall, Keighley), witness said it was possible that Cantwell might have got rid of the other forks during the chase.

Somebody’s “Joke”

Charles Cantwell told the bench that he was drunk at the time of the alleged offence. He put his raincoat over a chair in the cafe, but he put nothing into the pockets. He suggested that someone might have put the things in his pocket as a joke.
“As far as assaulting the officer goes, it was him that assaulted me,” added defendant.
Robinson said he had no knowledge of anything having been taken. He did not take anything.
Mrs Cantwell had nothing to say.

That is the last newspaper article I have been able to find about either Charles or Edna May. Perhaps six months in prison was the turning point and they had a trouble free existence after that.

Charles died on 22 January 1980 and left a will valued at £9641.

Edna May died on 1 May 1980 and she left a will valued at £15155.

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Workday Wednesday – Smith Buckley (1848-1913)

Smith Buckley is my 1st cousin 3x removed. Our common ancestors are Thomas Buckley and Henrietta Mason, my 3x great grandparents. That makes Smith a nephew of my 2x great grandparents James Buckley and Sarah Tattersall.

Smith was born sometime in the first quarter of 1848 in Bingley, West Yorkshire. He was the second of seven children to William Buckley and Mary Heaps.

Sometime in the second quarter of 1867 Smith married Margaret Day in Bradford, West Yorkshire. Over the next 21 years they had seven children.

In the 1871 census Smith is working as a “mechanic”. I know from the following newspaper article that at some point in the next eight years he started working for Geo. Hattersley & Sons as “foreman mechanic”.

On Monday 30 December 1878 Smith was involved in a very nasty accident at work. The Keighley News reported on the event on 4 January 1879.

Smith Buckley - Keighley News 4 January 1879.png

Taken from the British Newspaper Archive website

HAWORTH

A VERY NARROW ESCAPE – A man named Smith Buckley (30), living at Spring Row, Haworth, who works as foreman mechanic for Messrs Geo Hattersley and sons, at Mytholmes Mill, had a marvellously narrow escape from being fatally injured while at work on Monday morning. The mill is partially worked by water-power, and during the recent frost a large water-wheel, which is in constant use, had been stationary. The thaw caused it to move again, the buckets being full of snow, and a segment in one of the chain of wheels was broken. While Buckley and another workman were attending to it, props were used to retain it in position, and as one piece of wood was being substituted for another, the support gave way, and Buckley was caught between the wall and one of the spokes of the revolving wheel. He managed to shift himself into a less perilous position before the next spoke came round, but he was taken round with the wheel four or five times before it came to a stand, only narrowly avoiding a fatal termination to the accident. The inhabitants of Spring Row, which is opposite, saw the whole occurrence. The unfortunate man, whose left leg was shattered below the knee in a shocking manner, was conveyed to the Keighley Cottage Hospital, where Dr. Jack, who attended to him, found amputation at the knee joint necessary. He had also sustained severe bruises all over the body, but there were no other fractures. The case is progressing favourably towards recovery. The injured man has a wife and four children depending on him.

I think it’s fair to say that life was going to be very much more difficult for Smith and his family after the accident and the loss of his leg. So this must have been a very worrying time for them.

I know from another newspaper report that Smith was a member of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers (ASE). The history of the union can be traced back to the formation of the Journeymen Steam Engine, Machine Makers’ and Millwrights’ Friendly Society, in 1826, popularly known as the “Old Mechanics”.

In 1920 the ASE was one of several unions that came together to form the Amalgamated Engineering Union (AEU).

Anyway, back to Smith, and life after his accident.

On the 4 May 1880 the Bradford Observer reported on a meeting the previous evening of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers.

Smith Buckley - Bradford Observer 4 May 1880.png

Taken from the British Newspaper Archive website

THE AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

Yesterday evening, a large meeting was held in the hall of the Mechanics’ Institute, Keighley. The meeting was convened by the members of the Keighley Branch of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers, for the purpose of presenting Mr Smith Buckley, of Haworth, one of their members, who met with an accident which caused the loss of his leg, with the sum of £100. Mr J Summerscales, of Keighley, occupied the chair, and impressed upon his audience the necessity for rendering better support to the Cottage Hospital in the town. Mr John Burnett, general secretary to the London society, spoke of the benefit which trades unions had had in raising the position of the working classes and in improving the trade of the country. Mr D Guile, of London, also addressed the meeting. Mr Henry Mitchell, president of the Bradford Chamber of Commerce, made the presentation, and spoke of the relation of England with foreign countries. The usual complimentary votes brought the meeting to a close.

Over the next thirty years Smith had various occupations listed in the census returns:-

1881 – Beerhouse keeper at the Princess Hotel, Duncan Street, Bradford. He made the newspapers again during his time as landlord for allowing drunkeness on his premises.

1891 – Furniture broker

1901 – Machine fitter

1911 – Textile fitter

I have enormous pride and respect for Smith. It seems as though he was courageous, determined and very hard working.

Smith died at the age of 65 and was buried in Utley Cemetery, Keighley on 9 July 1913.

Military Monday – Clement May (1895-1916)

Military Monday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

We all have ancestors who have served in the military. Military Monday is a place to post their images, stories and records of their service in various branches of the military.

Clement May is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. His parents are John May and Mary Ellen Buckley. Our common ancestors are Thomas Buckley and Henrietta Mason, my 3x great grandparents.

Clement was born sometime in Q2 of 1895 and was the fourth of at least ten children to John and Mary Ellen May.

There doesn’t appear to be any surviving military service records for Clement. However I have been able to establish that he was a Private in the West Yorkshire (Prince of Wales Own) Regiment. He was in the 16th Battalion and his regimental service number was 32857.

His entry on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) website shows that Clement died of wounds on 13 November 1916.

I have tried to find out which battle he might have been in at the time of his death. The Battle of the Ancre seems to be the most likely.

At the time of his death Clement had £2 12s 3d credit in his military account – authority was given on 3 March 1917 for this to be paid to his father. The in August 1919 a War Gratuity payment of £3 was also paid to the family. The image below is from the Army Register of Soldiers Effects from www.ancestry.co.uk

Clement May - WW1 Effects.png

Clement is buried at the Couin British Cemetery in the Pas de Calais region of France.

The following information is from the CWGC.

Couin Chateau was used as a divisional headquarters from 1915 to 1918.

The British Cemetery was begun in May 1916 by the field ambulances of the 48th (South Midland) Division, and was used by units and field ambulances during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. It was closed at the end of January 1917 because further extension was not possible, and now contains 401 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and three German graves.

The new British Cemetery was opened across the road and was used by field ambulances from January 1917 (with a long interval in 1917-18) to the end of the war. One grave was moved there after the Armistice from a cemetery at Coigneux. It now contains 360 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and two German graves.

Both cemeteries were designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

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Tombstone Tuesday – Thomas Buckley (1795-1880)

This gravestone is in Utley Cemetery, Keighley, West Yorkshire. It is grave number 169 in unconsecrated ground in Section B of the cemetery. I have only just acquired the photograph today courtesy of a Bradford City Council bereavement services officer.

I bought a copy of the National Burial Index at a family history fair last weekend and did a bit of searching. I found some ancestors buried at Utley Cemetery and emailed Bradford Council for any information such as plot numbers or a map.

To my total surprise and gratitude they sent me a reply today about the people I identified plus other related ancestors – and photographs of the headstones. So a huge thanks for a superb service. I have replied and expressed my thanks.

Anyway back to the story.

The plot was bought by Thomas Buckley, my 3x great grandfather. The grave is the resting place of Thomas (1795-1880); his first wife Henrietta Mason (1794-1861); their daughter Mary Barker (1826-1887); and Thomas’s second wife Maria Hindle (1800-1871).

Much of this information is new to me as a result of receiving the photograph and doing a bit of digging this afternoon.

For instance I didn’t know that Thomas and Henrietta had three children who died in infancy. I didn’t know that Thomas had married again after Henrietta died. I discovered this afternoon that he married Maria Hindle in Q3 1866.

When I checked the 1871 census again I noticed that Thomas is shown as married but no wife is there – I hadn’t picked this up before. So I searched for Maria Buckley and found her as an inmate in the Union House.

There is no indication in the census return that she was either deaf-and-dumb, or blind, or a lunatic or an imbecile or an idiot.  However, the 1871 census was taken on 2nd / 3rd April and Maria died just two months later on 2nd June. So I do wonder if she was so poorly that Thomas couldn’t look after her or if there was some other reason why she would be in the Union House.

I need to take a closer look at Thomas and his family and perhaps do an Ancestor Profile post in the future.

In

Memory of

THREE CHILDREN OF

THOMAS & HENRIETTE BUCKLEY,

OF KEIGHLEY, WHO DIED

IN THEIR INFANCY.

THE ABOVE WAS INTERRED

AT THE PARISH CHURCH

 

ALSO OF HENRIETTE

WIFE OF THE ABOVE NAMED

THOMAS BUCKLEY, WHO DIED JUNE 8TH

1861, IN THE 68TH YEAR OF HER AGE.

She lived respected, and died lamented

 

ALSO OF MARIA WIFE OF THE ABOVE

NAMED THOMAS BUCKLEY, WHO DIED JUNE

2ND 1871, IN THE 71ST YEAR OF HER AGE

 

ALSO OF THE ABOVE THOMAS BUCKLEY

WHO DIED MAY 11TH 1880 AGED 85 YEARS

 

ALSO OF MARY WIFE OF WILLIAM BARKER,

AND DAUGHTER OF THE ABOVE THOMAS & HENRIETTE

BUCKLEY, WHO DIED MAY 14TH  1887

AGED 60 YEARS