Wedding Wednesday

Wedding Wednesday – Ellen Gawthrop & John James Pilkington

Ellen Gawthrop is my 1st cousin 3x removed.  She married John James Pilkington on 27 September 1900 at the Wesleyan Chapel in Sabden, Lancashire.

I recently found this report of the wedding in the Burnley Express and couldn’t resist sharing it.  I can’t believe that the report actually includes what appears to be a full list of all the presents!!!

Certainly the happy couple were not going to be short of the odd silver tea spoon.  And perhaps Mr. & Mrs. Bamber were a bit embarrassed by their gift and felt the need to describe the size – a “massive flower stand”.

Ellen Gawthrop wedding 1900

Interesting Wedding – At two o’clock on Thursday afternoon, the Wesleyan Chapel at Sabden, was the scene of a wedding, the bride being Miss Ellen Gawthrop, Sabden, the third daughter of Mr. Israel Gawthrop, the esteemed manager of the  firm of Messrs. James Stuttard and Sons, Sabden, and the bridegroom, Mr. John James Pilkington, of Blackburn, but formerly of Sabden, and son of the late Mr. John Pilkington, Sabden.  Unusual interest was evinced in the wedding by the villagers, and the interesting ceremony, which was performed by the Rev. J. H. Wilkinson, Wesleyan minister, of Padiham, was witnessed by a very large company of friends.  The interior of the chapel had been decorated with choice flowers, etc., and the ceremony was altogether an imposing one.  The bride, who was given away by her father, Mr. Israel Gawthrop, looked exceedingly charming in a rich dress of white alpaca, trimmed with lace, with hat to match.  She was attended by Miss Annie Gawthrop and Miss Bertha Gawthrop, sisters, who were attired in dresses of heliotrope, with grey felt hats, and Miss May Jackson, Padiham, and Miss Clarris Entwistle (nieces), who wore dresses of cream alpaca, with whitehats and shoes to match.  Mr. Frank Entwistle, brother-in-law to the bridegroom, acted as best man.  After the ceremony the wedding party, to the number of about 50, had a drive to Higher Hodder Bridge, where they were entertained to a sumptuous repast.  Mr. and Mrs. Pilkington left in the afternoon, amidst the heartiest good wishes of all, for Scarborough, where they intend to spend the honeymoon.

The following is the list of presents:- Mr. and Mrs. Gawthrop, cheque; Mr. and Mrs. I Gawthrop, dinner service; Mr. and Mrs. Jackson (Padiham), eider down quilt; Mr. and Mrs. Haworth, two door mats; Mr. and Mrs. Wilkinson, silver spirit kettle; Mr. and Mrs. Entwistle, toilet set; Mr. and Mrs. Pilkington, silver coffee pot and cruet; Miss A. Gawthrop and Mr. T. L. Anderton, marble timepiece; Miss B. Gawthrop and Mr. R. Anderton, tea service; Miss Gregson, silver salts in case; Miss Birtwistle and Mr. Dixon (Padiham), one dozen silver tea spoons, Miss Webster, silver cake knife; Mr. and Mrs. Ayrey, oak barometer; Miss Whittles, bedroom slippers and salts; Mrs. Bailey, cushion; Miss Foulds and Miss Birtwell, silk head-rest and tea cosy; Miss McLachlan, hall brushes with mirror; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ingham (Blackburn), half a dozen silver desert spoons and forks; Miss Mary and Master Harry Jackson (Padiham), cheese dish and pickle jar; Mr. and Mrs. Stuttard (Read Hall), travelling clock and cheque; Miss Haworth, one dozen silver tea spoons; Miss Brotherton, brass paper rack; Miss Nuttall, plaques; Mrs. Duerden, set of jugs; Mrs. Fish, one dozen silver tea spoons in case; Mr. and Mrs. Hopkinson, cheque; Mrs. Townsend (Manchester), silver cake basket; Miss Burton, silver cruet and jam spoons; Miss Bradshaw, d’oyleys; Mr. Burton (Fence), timepiece; Mr. and Mrs. Kay (Darwen), mirror in brass frame; Mr. Harry Pilkington (America), silver sugar sifter; Mr. and Mrs. E. Standing, brass photo frame; Mr. and Mrs. H. Barnes (Darwen), picture; Mrs. Harwood (Darwen), silver cake knife; Mr. and Mrs. Bamber, massive flower stand; Miss Whittaker, fruit dish; Mr. and Mrs. Bradshaw (Southport), half a dozen silver tea spoons and tray cloth; Miss Anderton; trinket set; Miss Standing, brass stand; Mr. Rigby (Swinton), half a dozen tea, desert, and table spoons; Miss Gawthrop, drawing-room chair; the Misses Rowland (Blackpool), Dresden vase and afternoon tray cloth; Mrs. Foulds, plaques; Mrs. Roberts, bread-board, knife, etc.

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Wedding Wednesday – Flapper Girl Identified!

Last June I posted this photograph in the Wedding Wednesday theme and admitted then that I had no idea about the identity of the happy couple.

Well I can now tell you that I solved the mystery – thanks to my cousin in Australia.

The photograph is of George Isaac Dawson and Constance Mabel Austin leaving the church after their wedding ceremony.  I don’t have an exact date but it is mid to late 1920’s.

George Isaac is my grand uncle – my grandfather’s brother.  He was born sometime in Q1 of 1901 in Keighley, West Yorkshire.  In the 1911 census he is living with his parents, James Dawson and Emma Buckley, and his siblings at 91 West Lane, Keighley.

His entry in the GRO birth register is Isaac but he was known as ‘Ike’ to me – at least that’s how my grandfather referred to him.

Anyway, ‘Ike’ emigrated to Australia.  He sailed from London on 15 September 1923 on board the ship Orsova bound for Fremantle, Australia.  Here is his entry in the passenger list.

At the moment I don’t have any information about Constance’s family.

I do know that ‘Ike’ and Constance had their first of four children in 1928.  So within five years of arriving in Australia ‘Ike’ fell in love, married and started a family.

I really admire ‘Ike’s’ sense of adventure – leaving his family in the UK and starting a new life at the other side of the world.  I am also glad that almost 89 years later we are still in contact with our Dawson relatives in New South Wales.

Wedding Wednesday – Who’s that girl?

This is a photograph from my own collection.  I have to admit up front that I don’t know the happy couple.  Well, what I mean is that I know who the groom is but I never met either him or the bride (as far as I know) and I am not related to them.

The photograph is in one of those little fold over covers that you get from photographers.  There is a description on the cover written by my dad – it says

‘Harold Crossland’s wedding.  Dad’s best friend from Rotherham’

The ‘dad’ referred to in the description is my granddad – Joseph Dawson.  He is the chap second from the left – I am guessing that he was ‘best man’.

So I did a search on Find My Past and came up with a couple of possibilities.

There is a marriage in the December quarter of 1943 between Harold Crossland and Marian Jenkinson  in the Rother Valley registration district.

There is also a marriage in the June quarter of 1947 between Harold Crossland and Marian Smith in the Sheffield registration district.

For those who don’t know the area Rotherham and Sheffield are not a million miles apart.  I know that my grandparents lived in Brinsworth (part of Rotherham) for a while and I guess that this is where Joseph made friends with Harold.

Of course the wedding could have been held somewhere else completely and I am way off the mark.

My granddad was born in 1903, so, if I am right then he would be either 40 or 44 when these photographs were taken.  I am really bad at trying to estimate ages – what do you think?

Are there any clues from the style of clothes?

Leave a comment if you think you can help.

Wedding Wednesday – Another Mystery Couple

Here is yet another photograph of a newly married couple and again I have no idea who they are.

There are even less clues than the photograph I posted two weeks ago.  This time there is no photographer name or any indication of location.

The couple look really happy and it seems like they have just enjoyed their reception meal.

I think that the period is maybe late 1940’s or early 1950’s.  I am going to take the advice from readers who commented on my last wedding photograph of a mystery couple and try to research the fashion of the 1940’s and 1950’s.  Also perhaps post it on a family history forum and see what happens.

Anyway, whoever they are I hope that they had a wonderful life together.