Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove

Sunday’s Obituary – Susannah Musgrove (1856-1869)

Susannah Musgrove is my great grand aunt – a sister of my great grandfather Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove.

Susannah was born on 2 August 1856 at Over Darwen, Lancashire. She was the first of five children born to my 2x great grandparents John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth.

I had known for a long time that Susannah died young at the age of 12. However I have only just found a newspaper article with details of the circumstances of her death. This report is from the Preston Herald of 6 February 1869.

Susannah Musgrove - Preston Herald 6 February 1869.png

A GIRL KILLED AT THE BELGRAVE PAPER STAINING WORKS

On Monday afternoon a fatal accident happened to a girl named Susannah Musgrove, aged 12 years, daughter of Mr John Musgrove, who was employed as a short time tearer in connection with the block printing department. It appears that she had been to school on Monday afternoon, and on returning called at the print shop to see if her master was there, and was seen playing about in the room on the second floor. About 5.40pm a man named Joseph Riding had occasion to use the hoist, which is in one corner of the room, and used for the purpose of raising goods from one room to another. As the hoist did not descend lower than the second floor, the man Riding went to see what was the cause. On getting there he found the deceased laid down on her belly on the floor, with her head underneath the hoist. The hoist was at once raised, but the unfortunate girl was dead. She must have been in the act of looking down the hoist way into the lower room, and therefore could not see the hoist when descending. An inquest will be held on the body.

You know sometimes you just wonder how much tragedy one family can have.

Susannah’s grandfather, Joseph Musgrove (my 3x great grandfather) died in 1858 as the result of a fall at home when he dislocated his neck. I blogged about this here.

John Musgrove, Susannah’s father, committed suicide in 1884 – see blog post here.

Of the five children that were born to John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth only two survived to adulthood – Thomas and Joseph.

Susannah died as the result of the accident. Her brother George died on the day he was born 20 August 1857. And another brother, James, died at three months old in 1868.

So sad.

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Travel Tuesday – Annie Procter (nee Musgrove) – Australian Adventure

Annie Musgrove is my grand aunt. She was born on 26 March 1895 in Clitheroe, Lancashire, to parents Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell – my great grandparents.

Annie married Percy Procter in Clitheroe on 14 June 1919.

I have recently found the following the newspaper article in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 13 June 1956 in which they recount Annie’s recent extended stay in Australia….on doctors orders!!

Annie Procter - CAT 13 January 1956.png

BACK HOME AFTER 7 YEARS IN AUSTRALIA

A grand sunny climate, but….

“Follow the doctor’s advice” might well be the moral of this story of a rejuvenated 61-year-old Mrs Annie Procter, who recently arrived back in Clitheroe, after seven years in Australia.

It was in August, 1948, that Mrs Procter was advised by her doctor to go and live with her married daughter in Australia – for health reasons.

And so Mrs Procter set out on her first sea trip – a voyage across the world. And what a rough trip it turned out to be, too. But Mrs Procter enjoyed the buffetings of the ship in the rough waters of the Indian Ocean – much to the disgust of her less fortunate fellow passengers.

Her destination was Moorabbin, a suburb of Melbourne, where she lived with her daughter, Betty, now Mrs B Eastwood, and family. Mrs Procter spent five years at the seaside town of Parkdale, where the climate proved entirely to her liking.

In fact, the improvements in Mrs Procter’s health was so rapid, that six months after landing in Australia she started work in the mending department of a woollen mill at Bentleigh, near Moorabbin, and continued working without a break until coming back to this country.

BEHIND TIMES

Her general opinion of Australia? “Well behind the times,” says Mrs Procter. “They have a lot to learn, yet.”

Climate? – No complaints, naturally, in view of its recuperative powers.

Housing? – The drawback with new housing estates is that drainage and sewerage is not carried out until years after the completion of the building. Consequently, tenants are faced with ankle-deep mud covering the unmade roads after rain.

Litter? – Australians are definitely not litter-conscious.

Licensing laws? – Peculiar. The present hours, 9am to 6 pm are responsible for queer happenings.

Such as the occasion when a young couple, friends of Mrs Procter, went to a ball. In their car they took a zipped bag filled with bottles – a portable bar for use during the evening.

It is quite a common sight to see hotels besieged by workers (who finish at 5pm) and the same people emerging at 6pm carrying liquid refreshment to be enjoyed at home.

Cost of living? – The biggest drain on people’s wages out there is clothing and furnishings, which are exceedingly costly.

Mrs Procter, who is living with her sister and brother-in-law, Mr and Mrs Robert Halstead, at their grocery shop in Curzon Street, greatly enjoyed the voyage back to England – “an absolute contrast to the outward trip” – calling at various ports en route, including Naples where she visited the ruins of Pompeii.

Though she has decided to settle down for the time being in Clitheroe, Mrs procter still feels the urge to travel. And no wonder. “After the Australian trip, I feel 20 years younger,” she says.

An interesting personal reflection on life in Australia 50+ years ago.

Here is what Wikipedia has to say about Moorabbin in Australia now.

Wedding Wednesday – Ellen Musgrove and Robert Halstead

Ellen Musgrove is my grand aunt – in other words my grandad’s sister. Her parents are Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell, my great grandparents.

Ellen was born on 21 February 1881 in Clitheroe, Lancashire. Robert Halstead was born on 31 October 1880, also in Clitheroe.

Ellen and Robert were married on 21 Jun 1902.

On the occasion of their golden wedding anniversary in 1952 the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times published the following article on 20 June.

Ellen Musgrove & Robert Halstead Golden Wedding.png

Clitheroe Couple Married 50 Years

A quiet family celebration at home tomorrow will mark 50 years of married life for Mr and Mrs Robert Halstead, of 1 Curzon Street, Clitheroe.

Mr Halstead, who is 71, is well known to many Clitheronians. He was born in Curzon Street, next door to his present home, and has lived in the street all his life – except for seven years after his marriage, when he resided in Monk Street, just around the corner.

He has always taken an interest in music, and was organist at the Congregational Church, Clitheroe, for five years during the war. He was pianist at the Sunday meetings of the old P.S.A. in Clitheroe, and will be remembered my many as pianist in a dance band led by Mr Joe Margerison.

AT THE MILL

Mr Halstead, who, like his wife, worked at Foulsykes Mill for a number of years, had latterly been employed at Sun Street Mill, as an overlooked. He retired in 1947.

He is associated with Moor Lane Methodist Church, and is an enthusiastic member of the Castle Park Veterans’ Bowling Club, with whom he has played on several occasions.

His wife, Mrs Ellen Halstead, formerly Miss Musgrove, was employed as a weaver at Foulsykes Mill many years ago, and later ran the mixed business at their home.

Mr and Mrs Halstead, who were married at the old Baptist Chapel in Shaw Bridge by the Rev L J Shackleford, have one daughter and one grandchild.

Sunday’s Obituary – Mary Alice Musgrove (1887-1952)

Mary Alice Musgrove is my grand aunt – in other words my grandad’s sister. Her parents are Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell, my great grandparents.

Mary was born on 14 December 1887 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

I have Mary in all the census returns from 1891 to 1911 and in the 1939 Register. I can see from these documents that Mary was employed all her working life as a “cotton weaver”.

Mary passed away on 31 October 1952.

The following two articles were published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 7 November 1952.

Mary Alice Musgrove Obituary 1.png

Neighbour’s Find

When Miss Mary Alice Musgrove (65), of 11 Brownlow Street, Clitheroe, did not go to work as usual on Friday morning, neighbours became worried and at lunch time one of them broke into the house and found her lying dead at the foot of the stairs, still in her night attire.

Miss Musgrove lived alone and was employed as a weaver at Sun Street Mill.

A post mortem was held but an inquest was found to be unnecessary.

 

Mary Alice Musgrove Obituary 2.pngMISS M A MUSGROVE

The cremation took place at Skipton on Wednesday of Miss Mary Alice Musgrove of 11 Brownlow Street, Clitheroe, who died suddenly, after a short illness, at her home on Friday. In accordance with her wish, her ashes were later scattered on Pendle Hill.

Miss Musgrove, who was 65, was employed for most of her working life at Jubilee Mill. She worked for some time at Foulsykes Mill, and, since it closed 10 years ago, she had been a weaver at Sun Street Mill.

Her two brothers and two sisters will have deep sympathy in their loss.

Wedding Wednesday – Joseph Musgrove and Bridget Maria Grainger

Joseph Musgrove is my great grand uncle (the brother of my great grandfather Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove).

Joseph was born on 13 April 1864 to parents John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth (my 2x great grandparents).

On 16 May 1891 Joseph married Bridget Maria Grainger in Clitheroe, Lancashire. Bridget had been born on 23 February 1867 in Devon.

On the 9 May 1941 the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times published an article celebrating the golden wedding anniversary of Joseph and Bridget.

Joseph and Bridget Musgrove Golden Wedding.png

FAMILY OF ELEVEN

REARED ON £1 A WEEK

GOLDEN WEDDING MEMORIES OF MR. & MRS. J. MUSGROVE

An insight into conditions of life which obtained fifty or more years ago was given in an interview by Mr and Mrs Joseph Musgrove, of 66 Wilkin Street, Clitheroe, who will celebrate their golden wedding on Monday next. They were married on May 12, 1891, at St James’s Church, by the curate, the Rev Mr Ince.

STARTED WORK WHEN SIX!

Seventy-seven years of age and a native of Darwen, Mr Musgrove came to Clitheroe at the age of six and a half years, and started work in the spinning room at Messrs Dewhurst’s Salford Bridge Mills on attaining his eighth year. He was employed full time at eleven. When sixteen, he went to the print works at Barrow, but left there in 1896 to enter the employ of Clitheroe Corporation highways department, continuing for thirty years, except for a break of six years during which he worked as a mason’s labourer.

All his life, Mr Musgrove has taken a keen interest in both football and cricket, rarely missing a match either at Shaw Bridge or at Chatburn Road. For fifty-six years he has been identified with Court “Royal Castle” (No. 8549) of the Ancient Order of Foresters, and still holds the post of senior door beadle. For eleven years he was one of the borough’s halberdiers. “We had to buy our own top hats and white gloves in those days,” he said, adding: “There were none o’these fancy cloaks and three-cornered hats!”

SIXPENCE A WEEK!

Mrs Musgrove, whose maiden name was Miss Bridget Maria Grainger – she is a sister of the late Mr Luke Grainger, formerly of West View – was born seventy-four years ago near Taunton, Somerset, and came to Clitheroe at the age of sixteen. She learnt to weave at Salford Bridge Mill, where Mr Musgrove learnt spinning, but she had not had charge of two looms long when the mill closed down, and she was accordingly out of work for some time.

“Of course, I had been working for years before I came to Clitheroe,” she said. “Maybe you won’t believe me when I tell you that when eight years old, my wage was sixpence a week.”

Mrs Musgrove added the information that this remuneration was for looking after the smaller children of a well-to-do family, who also provided her with meals. “They regarded the sixpence as spending money, but my mother had to clothe me out of it,” she added.

Speaking of old times, Mrs Musgrove said: “Yes, they were hard, I can’t say I would like to live them over again – not under the same conditions, at any rate.” She went on to say that it was a big problem to bring up a family of eleven on £1 a week. “I can’t tell you how we managed, but we did. It was a hard struggle, but we were fortunate in having good health.”

SUPREME SACRIFICE

Of a family of eleven children, seven – three daughters and four sons survive. Of four sons who served in the last Great War, two made the supreme sacrifice.

All their married life Mr and Mrs Musgrove have been associated with St Mary’s Parish Church. Mrs Musgrove being one of the oldest and a founder member of the Mothers’ Union. Their golden wedding anniversary will be celebrated quietly at home, with just a few relatives and neighbours for tea. “Lord Woolton won’t let us do much more.” Mrs Musgrove said with a laugh.

In conjunction with their many friends, we wish them health and many more years of happiness together.

Sunday’s Obituary – John Musgrove (c1833-1884)

John Musgrove is my 2x great grandfather. He was born c1833 to parents Joseph Musgrove and Jane Dewhurst.

On 6 October 1855 John married Catherine Ainsworth at the Parish Church in Blackburn, Lancashire. They had at least 5 children:-

Susannah – born 2 August 1856 – died 1 February 1869
George – born 20 August 1857 – died 20 August 1857
Thomas Ainsworth – born 12 December 1860 – died 16 April 1928
Joseph – born 13 April 1864 – died 3 June 1948
James – born 5 August 1868 – died 23 November 1868

I have found John on the 1841, 1851, 1861 and 1881 census returns. His occupation varied over the years and he was described as a crofter, a carter and a general labourer. In the 1871 census Catherine is living at 18 Ellen Street, Over Darwen, Lancashire and I assume that John was away from home at the time of the census.

On the 2 December 1858 tragedy struck the family when John’s father, Joseph Musgrove, died as the result of a fall at home. Here’s a blog post about his death – Sunday’s Obituary – Joseph Musgrove

Ever since I started my interest in genealogy and researching my family history my mother has regularly told me of a story about a suicide by hanging somewhere in the past. So I was aware that at some point I may find the evidence.

Back in August this year I finally got round to ordering a copy of John Musgrove’s death certificate. And now I have the confirmation of the family story – cause of death was “suicide by hanging – unsound mind”.

John Musgrove - Death Certificate

According to the death certificate John died at Railway Road, Clitheroe, Lancashire, on 17 September 1884. An inquest was held by the Deputy Coroner J C Anderson on the same date.

The family story was that John returned home one night and the door was locked. Whether he had been drinking, whether John and Catherine had argued, I guess I will never know. Catherine refused to let him in and John replied that he might as well kill himself. If the story is to be believed then Catherine threw him a rope.

Despite my best efforts I have not been able to find any record of the inquest. I have tried Clitheroe library and been to Blackburn library to search the newspaper archives. I’ve also spoken with the Blackburn Coroners Office.  There is a death notice in the local Blackburn paper but no report of the inquest. I discovered during this search that inquest records/reports were considered to be the property of the coroner and were most likely destroyed when the coroner retired.

So sadly it seems I will never learn any more about the tragic events of Wednesday 17 September 1884.

On this day … 16th April

1816 … Edward Bentley was born at Pateley Bridge, North Yorkshire.  He is the maternal grandfather of my wife’s 4th cousin 1x removed.  His parents were David Bentley and Dorothy Gill

1857 … James Dawson was born in Cowling, West Yorkshire.  His parents were John Dawson and Ellen Gawthrop.  He is my great grandfather

1868 … Harrison Musgrove died in Kendal, Westmoreland.  His parents were William Musgrove and Harriot Francis.  He is my 2x great grandfather

1928 … Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove died in Clitheroe, Lancashire.  His parents were John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth.  He is my great grandfather