Ellen Stowell

Wedding Wednesday – Albert Bentley and Ruth Halstead

Ruth Halstead is my 1st cousin 1x removed. Our common ancestors are Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell – my great grandparents.

Ruth married Albert Bentley on Wednesday 5 July 1933 at Moor Lane Methodist Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire. A report of the marriage was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on Friday 7 July (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Albert Bentley & Ruth Halstead - CAT 7 July 1933.png

BENTLEY – HALSTEAD

A large congregation of personal and other friends assembled in the Moor Lane Methodist Church on Wednesday afternoon to witness the wedding of Mr Albert Bentley, elder son of Mr and Mrs Arthur Bentley, of Moore Street, Burnley, and formerly of Barrow, to Miss Ruth Halstead, only daughter of Mr and Mrs Robert Halstead, of 1 Curzon Street, Clitheroe. The bride has been for some years a prominent member of the choir at Moor Lane and her services as a soprano soloist have been freely utilised by other churches and on the concert platform. She was also identified with the Parish Church Amateur Operatic Society. The bridegroom is well known in local cricket circles, having played in turn for Barrow, Whalley and Burnely St. Andrews.

Several fellow choristers of the bride were in the choir and led the singing of the hymn “Crown with Thy benediction.” The ceremony was performed by the Rev. P S Johnson, and the duties of organist were fulfilled by Mr G Cowgill.

The bride, who was given away by her father, looked becoming in a long ivory satin dress which had a yoke and puff sleeves of embroidered net, her veil, also of embroidered net, being crowned with a circlet of orange blossoms and pearls. Her bouquet was composed of pink roses.

Miss Bertha Procter was in attendance on her cousin, wearing an ankle length dress of yellow spun silk which had a cape collar, the skirt being relieved with narrow frills. A yellow crinoline hat trimmed with velvet ribbon, and a bouquet of mauve sweet peas, completed her toilette.

Mr Cyril S Aspden, of Colne, was the best man, and Messrs T R Halstead and G Steer the groomsmen.

A reception followed at the Starkie’s Arms Hotel. For the journey to Douglas, where the honeymoon is being spent, the bride travelled in a Lido blue silk dress and grey coat which had Lido blue revers, grey hat and shoes to tone. On their return Mr and Mrs Bentley are to reside at 9 Wellesley Street, Lowerhouse, Burnley. They were the recipients of numerous presents. The bridegroom’s gift to the bridesmaid was a wristlet watch.

Albert and Ruth had one daughter, Ruth Margaret Bentley on 13 July 1934.

I have previously written about Ruth and Albert here. And about Ruth Margaret here.

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Travel Tuesday – Annie Procter (nee Musgrove) – Australian Adventure

Annie Musgrove is my grand aunt. She was born on 26 March 1895 in Clitheroe, Lancashire, to parents Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell – my great grandparents.

Annie married Percy Procter in Clitheroe on 14 June 1919.

I have recently found the following the newspaper article in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 13 June 1956 in which they recount Annie’s recent extended stay in Australia….on doctors orders!!

Annie Procter - CAT 13 January 1956.png

BACK HOME AFTER 7 YEARS IN AUSTRALIA

A grand sunny climate, but….

“Follow the doctor’s advice” might well be the moral of this story of a rejuvenated 61-year-old Mrs Annie Procter, who recently arrived back in Clitheroe, after seven years in Australia.

It was in August, 1948, that Mrs Procter was advised by her doctor to go and live with her married daughter in Australia – for health reasons.

And so Mrs Procter set out on her first sea trip – a voyage across the world. And what a rough trip it turned out to be, too. But Mrs Procter enjoyed the buffetings of the ship in the rough waters of the Indian Ocean – much to the disgust of her less fortunate fellow passengers.

Her destination was Moorabbin, a suburb of Melbourne, where she lived with her daughter, Betty, now Mrs B Eastwood, and family. Mrs Procter spent five years at the seaside town of Parkdale, where the climate proved entirely to her liking.

In fact, the improvements in Mrs Procter’s health was so rapid, that six months after landing in Australia she started work in the mending department of a woollen mill at Bentleigh, near Moorabbin, and continued working without a break until coming back to this country.

BEHIND TIMES

Her general opinion of Australia? “Well behind the times,” says Mrs Procter. “They have a lot to learn, yet.”

Climate? – No complaints, naturally, in view of its recuperative powers.

Housing? – The drawback with new housing estates is that drainage and sewerage is not carried out until years after the completion of the building. Consequently, tenants are faced with ankle-deep mud covering the unmade roads after rain.

Litter? – Australians are definitely not litter-conscious.

Licensing laws? – Peculiar. The present hours, 9am to 6 pm are responsible for queer happenings.

Such as the occasion when a young couple, friends of Mrs Procter, went to a ball. In their car they took a zipped bag filled with bottles – a portable bar for use during the evening.

It is quite a common sight to see hotels besieged by workers (who finish at 5pm) and the same people emerging at 6pm carrying liquid refreshment to be enjoyed at home.

Cost of living? – The biggest drain on people’s wages out there is clothing and furnishings, which are exceedingly costly.

Mrs Procter, who is living with her sister and brother-in-law, Mr and Mrs Robert Halstead, at their grocery shop in Curzon Street, greatly enjoyed the voyage back to England – “an absolute contrast to the outward trip” – calling at various ports en route, including Naples where she visited the ruins of Pompeii.

Though she has decided to settle down for the time being in Clitheroe, Mrs procter still feels the urge to travel. And no wonder. “After the Australian trip, I feel 20 years younger,” she says.

An interesting personal reflection on life in Australia 50+ years ago.

Here is what Wikipedia has to say about Moorabbin in Australia now.

Wedding Wednesday – Ellen Musgrove and Robert Halstead

Ellen Musgrove is my grand aunt – in other words my grandad’s sister. Her parents are Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell, my great grandparents.

Ellen was born on 21 February 1881 in Clitheroe, Lancashire. Robert Halstead was born on 31 October 1880, also in Clitheroe.

Ellen and Robert were married on 21 Jun 1902.

On the occasion of their golden wedding anniversary in 1952 the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times published the following article on 20 June.

Ellen Musgrove & Robert Halstead Golden Wedding.png

Clitheroe Couple Married 50 Years

A quiet family celebration at home tomorrow will mark 50 years of married life for Mr and Mrs Robert Halstead, of 1 Curzon Street, Clitheroe.

Mr Halstead, who is 71, is well known to many Clitheronians. He was born in Curzon Street, next door to his present home, and has lived in the street all his life – except for seven years after his marriage, when he resided in Monk Street, just around the corner.

He has always taken an interest in music, and was organist at the Congregational Church, Clitheroe, for five years during the war. He was pianist at the Sunday meetings of the old P.S.A. in Clitheroe, and will be remembered my many as pianist in a dance band led by Mr Joe Margerison.

AT THE MILL

Mr Halstead, who, like his wife, worked at Foulsykes Mill for a number of years, had latterly been employed at Sun Street Mill, as an overlooked. He retired in 1947.

He is associated with Moor Lane Methodist Church, and is an enthusiastic member of the Castle Park Veterans’ Bowling Club, with whom he has played on several occasions.

His wife, Mrs Ellen Halstead, formerly Miss Musgrove, was employed as a weaver at Foulsykes Mill many years ago, and later ran the mixed business at their home.

Mr and Mrs Halstead, who were married at the old Baptist Chapel in Shaw Bridge by the Rev L J Shackleford, have one daughter and one grandchild.

Sunday’s Obituary – Mary Alice Musgrove (1887-1952)

Mary Alice Musgrove is my grand aunt – in other words my grandad’s sister. Her parents are Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell, my great grandparents.

Mary was born on 14 December 1887 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

I have Mary in all the census returns from 1891 to 1911 and in the 1939 Register. I can see from these documents that Mary was employed all her working life as a “cotton weaver”.

Mary passed away on 31 October 1952.

The following two articles were published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 7 November 1952.

Mary Alice Musgrove Obituary 1.png

Neighbour’s Find

When Miss Mary Alice Musgrove (65), of 11 Brownlow Street, Clitheroe, did not go to work as usual on Friday morning, neighbours became worried and at lunch time one of them broke into the house and found her lying dead at the foot of the stairs, still in her night attire.

Miss Musgrove lived alone and was employed as a weaver at Sun Street Mill.

A post mortem was held but an inquest was found to be unnecessary.

 

Mary Alice Musgrove Obituary 2.pngMISS M A MUSGROVE

The cremation took place at Skipton on Wednesday of Miss Mary Alice Musgrove of 11 Brownlow Street, Clitheroe, who died suddenly, after a short illness, at her home on Friday. In accordance with her wish, her ashes were later scattered on Pendle Hill.

Miss Musgrove, who was 65, was employed for most of her working life at Jubilee Mill. She worked for some time at Foulsykes Mill, and, since it closed 10 years ago, she had been a weaver at Sun Street Mill.

Her two brothers and two sisters will have deep sympathy in their loss.

Military Monday – Hedley Duckworth

Hedley Duckworth is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents were John Thomas Duckworth and Clara Stowell. Our common ancestors are William and Ellen Stowell, my 3x great grandparents.

Hedley was born in Padiham, Lancashire in 1885 – his birth is registered in Q4.

In 1892 his mother Clara died and I’m not sure what happened to Hedley in the years up to the 1901 census. I haven’t yet been able to find his father with any confidence.

However in 1901 Hedley is stopping with his uncle Henry Weller and his aunt Olivia Weller (nee Stowell) – his mother’s sister. Also there is another aunt Ruth Stowell. They are living in Padiham and Hedley is employed as a “moulder”.

By 1911 Hedley has joined the military and in the census of that year he is shown as serving in Malta with the rank of sergeant.

I have found Hedley’s military records on FMP – but sadly they are of very little help.

I know that he signed up for service in the East Lancashire Regiment at the age of 17 on 24 July 1902. The records show that he was discharged five days later on 28 July 1902. I can’t find any other information about this.

I know that he served in the army during WW1 as I have found his medal roll card on http://www.ancestry.co.uk. He served in the Army Service Corps and his military number was M.21068.

Hedley was mentioned in despatches on 13 Jun 1916. This is the lowest form of recognition that was announced. The Mention in Despatches (M.I.D.) for a Soldier is not an award of a medal, but is a commendation of an act of gallantry or service. Here is a Wikipedia article about being mentioned in despatches http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentioned_in_dispatches

There is also an article in the Burnley Express on 2 January 1915 with a photograph of Hedley and he is described as Coy. Sergeant Major Hedley Duckworth. Here’s a link to the article – http://search.findmypast.co.uk/bna/viewarticle?id=bl%2f0000283%2f19150102%2f059

Burnley ExpressCONCERTS AT THE FRONT

Our readers have been much interested in the accounts of two concerts at the front, programmes of which have been sent us by Coy. Sergeant Major Hedley Duckworth. They appeared on Wednesday and the previous Wednesday, and were given at the billet at the front by the “Commer Car” artistes, so named because they belong to that section of the A.S.C. which has a good many of these lorries and wagons.

Company Sergt. Duckworth, who has been chairman of these concerts, which have been greatly appreciated by the men in that particular area, in the A.S.C. 2nd Divisional Supply Column, and has worked himself up from a private to his present rank. Actually, he is a Padiham man. He has been twelve years in the army, and is now on his 21st year’s term. Most of the time he has been in Malta, and he was not in the South African War. He was over in Burnley and Padiham recently on five days’ special leave.

In his first letter to us, alluding to the concert programme, he says: “I am sure there are a great number of people in Burnley and district who would be pleased to hear how the officers try to encourage the men. Of course, this has only occurred to my knowledge in this column, but you see it helps to cheer up us poor Tommies.”

Coy. Sergt.-Major Duckworth’s father is Mr. John T Duckworth, of Knowlwood Road, Todmorden, and formerly of Padiham. His portrait has been kindly sent us by his aunt, Mrs Jenkinson, of Nelson, whose husband is serving with the East Lancashire Regiment. Duckworth has also a step-brother in Egypt.

Military Monday – Harry Musgrove (1889-1974)

Harry Musgrove is my great uncle – my maternal grandfathers brother. He was born 17 November 1889 to parents Thomas Musgrove and Ellen Stowell.

I have been lucky enough to find Harry’s WW1 service record on www.ancestry.co.uk.

Harry enlisted in Clitheroe, Lancashire on 11 November 1915 – six days before his 26th birthday.  At the time he was living at 11 Brownlow Street, Clitheroe and working as a ‘weaver’.

He served as a private in the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) and his service number was 103760.

It looks like Harry was initially assigned to the ‘home hospital’ reserve in Blackpool, Lancashire.  Then in May 1917 he ‘volunteered’ for overseas service – see below.

next information about his service shows that he was in Corsica from 9 June 1917 to 31 December 1918.  Harry returned home at the beginning of 1919 and according to his service papers was ‘demobbed’ on 23 February 1919 and transferred to the Class Z Reserve.

There is a note in the papers addressed to the Officer in Charge at the Queen Mary’s Military Hospital, Whalley, Lancashire.  This note was sent with Harry’s ‘medical history’ sheet on 16 January 1919.  On one of the documents is stamped ‘sick and wounded’ but I can’t find any information about Harry’s condition at the time.

The Queen Mary’s Military Hospital was formerly the Whalley Asylum. It was used as a military hospital  until June 1920. There is also a military cemetery attached to the hospital.

Queen Mary’s Military Hospital

Harry married Edith Hitchen on 20 January 1940.  He died on 25 November 1974 – eight days after his 85th birthday.

On this day…..24th March

1861     Ellen Stowell was born in Burnley, Lancashire.  Her parents were John Stowell (1828-1885) and Ann Astin (1831-1902).  She is my great grandmother.

2007     Doris Musgrove ( nee Jackson) died in Burnley, Lancashire.  She was my aunty and married to (Joseph) Harry Musgrove.