Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer

Sunday’s Obituary – Hartley Greenwood (1878-1932)

Hartley Greenwood is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Town Greenwood and Sarah Buckley. Our common ancestors are Thomas Buckley and Henrietta Mason (my 3x great grandparents).

Hartley was born in Keighley, West Yorkshire sometime in the June quarter of 1878.

On Christmas Eve 1902 Hartley married Rosetta Green at St. Peter’s church, Keighley. One of the witnesses was Hartley’s sister, Mary Alice.

I haven’t been able to find Hartley and Rosetta on the 1911 census.

So the next time I come across them is a newspaper report in the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer of Saturday 21 May 1932. This is a report of an inquest (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Hartley Greenwood - Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer 21 May 1932.png

FATAL BLOOD CLOT

Keighley Man’s Bus Journey with Broken Leg

At the adjourned inquest yesterday on Hartley Greenwood (53), textile fitter, of Aspley Street, Keighley, who died in hospital on March 30, P.C. Heaton, of the Bradford City Police, stated that on March 23 he saw Greenwood sitting on the causeway. Greenwood said he had been accidentally kicked by another man while boarding a tramcar, and could not stand. Witness took him to the Bradford Royal Infirmary, and, after he had received treatment, put him on a bus for Keighley. Greenwood, added witness, said he would be all right if he were put on the bus. There was no mention of Greenwood’s leg being broke.
The widow, Rosetta Greenwood, said in her opinion her husband should have been brought by ambulance from Bradford, adding: “I don’t think it is right to send a man out like that with a broken leg. He looked terrible when brought home from the bus stand.”
Dr. J. Prentice said he saw Greenwood, at his home, the same night. He was satisfied that Greenwood’s left leg was broken, and the next day ordered his removal to the Keighley hospital. If there was a great deal of swelling it was very difficult to tell if a bone was broken. In his opinion, however, the movement from Bradford would not cause the blood clot, which was set up by the fracture, and which was the cause of death.
A verdict in accordance with medical evidence was returned, the jury adding a rider that in their opinion Greenwood should have been sent home from Bradford in the ambulance, and should not have been allowed to travel by bus.

Hartley was buried on 2 April 1932 at St. John’s church, Ingrow with Hainworth, Keighley.

In the 1939 Register (taken at the outbreak of WW2) Rosetta is living with Hartley’s sister, Selina Elizabeth, at Prospect Place, Keighley.

About two years later Rosetta married Henry Hensman sometime in the September quarter of 1941. Henry was recently widowed and was about nine years older than Rosetta.

They were married for about 22 years before Henry died on 10 February 1963. Rosetta lived for another five years, passing away on 10 June 1968.

Sunday’s Obituary – William Henry Watkinson (1860-1932)

William Henry Watkinson is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. His parents are Thomas Watkinson and Harriet Mason. Our common ancestors are Anthony Mason and Mary Brayshaw – my 4x great grandparents.

William was born in Keighley, West Yorkshire – his birth is registered in the June quarter of 1860.

On 5 June 1889 William married Emma Crabtree at the Baxter Congregational Church, Kidderminster, Worcestershire. They had four children:-

Gwendolen – 1890
Arthur Stanley – 4 August 1891
Hilda Muriel – 17 May 1895
Geoffrey Lionel – 20 July 1899

William was an extremely successful and distinguished university professor of engineering. He died on 14 February 1932 and an obituary was published in the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer on Tuesday 16 February 1932 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Henry Watkinson - Yorkshire Post & Leeds Intelligencer 16 February 1932.png

Distinguished Northern Engineer

Professor William Henry Watkinson, a past-president of the Liverpool Engineering Society, has died at his residence in Bromborough, Cheshire, at the age of 71.
Professor Watkinson was a native of Keighley and had only an elementary school education. He worked as a half-timer in a mill and later served his apprenticeship to the practical side of engineering in a workshop in the town. Evening classes at the Keighley Institute provided the foundation of his scientific training. Following a period during which he worked in Bradford, he entered Glasgow University in 1882, becoming one of the assistants of Sir William Thomson, afterwards Lord Kelvin.
As assistant to Sir William Thomson and Professor Fleming Jenkin, he played a part in superintending the manufacture and laying of two Transatlantic cables.
He was at Glasgow University for five years, holding the Thomson Research Scholarship from 1885 to 1888 and the Whitworth Scholarship in 1886. Later he was Lecturer in Engineering at Sheffield and Professor of Engineering at Glasgow and the West of Scotland Technical College. He was Professor of Engineering at Liverpool University for 20 years, and was the inventor of superheaters and internal combustion engines.
Among his publications were papers read to the Institution of Naval Architects and other institutions.

Further reading about William is available on Grace’s Guide to British Industrial History – here.

Sunday’s Obituary – Matthew Webster (1870-1946) and Robert Webster (1909-1946)

Matthew Webster is the husband of Betsy Paley – my great grand aunt. Her parents are James Paley and Mary Ann Spink – my 2x great grandparents.

Matthew was born on 19 February 1870 at Aysgarth, Yorkshire and Betsy was born on 19 December 1871 at Hetton, Yorkshire.

Betsy and Matthew married sometime in the second quarter of 1900 – the marriage is registered at Skipton, Yorkshire. Over the next ten years they had six children:-

Annie – 8 March 1901
James Paley – 16 April 1903
John – 1905 (died 1906)
Richard – 15 December 1906
Frank – 3 September 1909
Robert – 3 September 1909

Matthew was a farmer at Hazel Head Farm, Hawkswick, Skipton. In the 1939 Register (taken at the outbreak of WW2) Annie and Robert were still at home with their parents.

Betsy died on 3 June 1941.

Tragedy struck the family again at the end of February 1946. The youngest son Robert was injured in an accident on the farm and died a few days later at Whinfield Hospital, Skipton on 27 February at the age of 36. The very next day his father, Matthew, died.

Father and son were buried on 2 March 1946 at Arncliffe, Yorkshire. The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer reported on their deaths on Friday 1 March 1946 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Matthew Webster - Yorkshire Post & Leeds Intelligencer 1 March 1946.png

The death took place yesterday of Mr. Matthew Webster, of Hazel Head, Hawkswick, Skipton, which he had farmed since 1901. His death, in his 77th year, followed the death of his son, Mr. Robert Webster, in Skipton and District Hospital on Wednesday. Mr. Robert Webster last week-end fell on a hay fork when working on a hay mow at the farm. Father and son will be buried together at Arncliffe Cemetery, tomorrow.

Black Sheep Sunday – Throup Shuttleworth

Throup Shuttleworth is the husband of my 1st cousin 2x removed Florrie Dawson.

Florrie was born on 1 February 1884 in Kildwick, West Yorkshire. Her parents are John Dawson and Elizabeth Bradley. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ellen Gawthrop – my 2x great grandparents.

Florrie and Throup married sometime in the March quarter of 1908 in Keighley, West Yorkshire.

Regrettably Throup made at least three appearances in the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer. Once in 1924 and twice (for the same incident) in 1933 (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Throup Shuttleworth - Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer 9 April 1924.png

9 April 1924

For theft of a wallet and money from a house at Steeton, Throup Shuttleworth (39), labourer, was sentenced to a month’s hard labour.

Throup Shuttleworth - Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer 29 May 1933.png

29 May 1933

WOMAN KILLED

Side-car Smashed in Silsden Road Crash

Mrs. Marion Simpson (27), a weaver, of North Street, Silsden was killed in a collision on the Steeton-Silsden Road last night between a motor-cycle combination in which she was riding and a motor car.
The cycle combination was being driven towards Steeton by Leonard Owens (33), motor mechanic, of Langbar, Ilkley. Mrs. Simpson was in the sidecar, and her husband, Harold Simpson (33), a weaver, was on the pillion seat. On the Steeton side of the bridge over the River Aire, the combination came into collision with a small saloon car driven towards Silsden by Throup Shuttleworth, of High Street, Steeton, who was the only occupant.
The sidecar was smashed, and Mrs. Simpson received extensive injuries, dying almost immediately.

Thorup Shuttleworth - Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer 17 June 1933.png

17 June 1933

Following a collision with a motor-cycle combination near the River Aire Bridge at Steeton, in which a young Silsden woman was killed, Throup Shuttleworth, motor engineer, of High Street, Steeton, was fined £5 at Keighley yesterday for driving a motor-car without due care. He was also fined 10s. for not having a driving licence. Defendant said the collision was an unavoidable accident.

You might just want to reflect on the different sentences for the two offences.

Throup passed away in 1938 at the age of 53.