Steeton with Eastburn

Sunday’s Obituary – Jane Dawson (nee Hargreaves) 1855-1922

Jane Hargreaves was born in Cowling, West Yorkshire about 1855.

Sometime in the September quarter of 1877 Jane married my great grand uncle Isaac Dawson in Keighley, West Yorkshire. Isaac’s parents are John Dawson and Ellen Gawthrop – my 2x great grandparents.

For much of their married life Isaac and Jane lived at Steeton with Eastburn, near Keighley. They had six children but three died young – only Matthew, Annie and Maggie lived until adulthood.

By the time of the 1911 census Isaac, Jane and Annie had moved to Morecambe, Lancashire. Isaac was employed as a “Company housekeeper”.

Jane passed away on 17 February 1922. The Morecambe Guardian published the following obituary (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Jane Dawson (nee Hargreaves) - Morecambe Guardian 25 February 1922.png

THE LATE MRS JANE DAWSON

On Tuesday afternoon the Rev. F Etherton Blake conducted the funeral service of the late Mrs Dawson, 39 Clarendon Road, in the Parliament Street Church, W.E. The Dawson family, some ten years ago, came from their Yorkshire home at Eastburn to Morecambe. They have life-long associations with Primitive Methodism, and to that extent the Church suffers the loss of a valuable devotee. Since Christmas Mrs Dawson has suffered acutely, and ever since been under the shadow of death. On February 17th she passed away at the age of 67 years and leaves a sorrowing husband, bereft son and two mourning daughters.

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Sarah Tattersall (1834-1880) – Revisited

Sarah Tattersall is my 2x great grandmother. I wrote about her on 15 December 2016 – here. So this new post is an update resulting from further research and new information.

Sarah was the illegitimate daughter of Mary Ann Tattersall and Ismael Yewdal (other spellings are available). The image below is from the England & Wales Non-Conformist birth and baptism records.

sarah-tattersall-birth

The transcript is as follows:-

Sarah Tattersall Daughter of Maryann Tattersall was born at Steeton in the Parish of Kildwick in the County of York, October the twelfth – one thousand eight hundred and thirty four.

The father of this child is Ismael Yewdal.

Dr William Greenwood Mitchell, Hannah Dale and Sarah Cowling present.

Witnesses Susannah Tattersall, Martha Tattersall and Ruth Tattersall.

Registered by Abraham Nichols, Minister April 22nd 1835.

In my further research I have been able to establish that Mary Ann Tattersall (my 3x great grandmother) was the daughter of Patrick Tattersall and Mary Gordon (my 4x great grandparents).  Patrick and Mary had at least nine children between 1792 and 1816. Mary Ann was the youngest born on 3 April 1816 – her brother Edmund was born on 5 May 1796.

Edmund Tattersall and Isabella Hudson had at least four children including:-

Susanna – born 12 August 1815

Martha – born 22 September 1816

Ruth – born 22 November 1820

I believe these three young women are the witnesses named in the birth record above and are nieces of Mary Ann Tattersall.

At the time of my original post in December 2016 I hadn’t been able to find Sarah on the 1841 or the 1851 census returns. I have now resolved these two issues.

The 1841 census for Edmund Tattersall shows him living at Steeton, Kildwick with his wife Isabella and Susannah, Martha, Ruth, Gordon and Sarah. I am confident that this Sarah is Edmund’s niece and my 2x great grandmother.

By the time of the 1851 census Sarah’s mother, Mary Ann Tattersall, had married William Wildman on 20 December 1841 at St Andrews church, Kildwick. Their marriage certificate below confirms Mary Ann’s father as Patrick Tattersall.

Tattersall & Willdman MC 1841.png

I found William and Mary Anne Wildman on the 1851 census living at Pinfold, Keighley. Also there are the following children:-

Sarah Wildman – born 1835

Thomas Wildman – born 1843

Anne Elizabeth Wildman – born 1846

Samuel Wildman – born 1850

There is no doubt in my mind that the Sarah Wildman from this census is my Sarah Tattersall. 

Or should she be Sarah Yewdal?

Sarah Tattersall married James Buckley and I got a copy of their marriage certificate as long ago 10 November 2003. They were married on 26 April 1857 at the Parish Church of Bingley in West Yorkshire.  Both Sarah and James gave their address as Harden – a small parish about 2 miles from Bingley.

I haven’t been able to scan the marriage certificate but hopefully from the photograph below you can see that James is a bachelor and Sarah a spinster. Both are “of full age”. James gave his father’s name as Thomas Buckley. The space for Sarah’s father has been left blank.

P1040166

With renewed enthusiasm over the past few weeks I have been filling in the Tattersall line of my family tree. I’m not sure why I was looking again for the marriage of Sarah and James Buckley – or even if I was. But one of those coincidences happened that throws everything into a new light.

I came across two marriage entries with same reference number in the June quarter of 1856 in Keighley, West Yorkshire – one for Sarah Yudle and James Buckley and another for Sarah Tattersall and James Buckley.

So obviously I had to order them – were there really two?

Anyway about a week after ordering the certificates I had a phone call from the General Register Office (GRO) to check my order. There was in fact only one marriage – for Sarah Yudle and James Buckley. However there was a note in the margin that at some point the name Yudle had been changed to Tattersall.

So the certificate finally arrives – see image below. This shows that James Buckley married Sarah Yudle at Keighley Register Office on 16 June 1856. James gives his age as 19 and Sarah as 20. James is a bachelor and Sarah a spinster. James gave his address as Coney Lane, Keighley and Sarah as Pinfold, Keighley. James gives his father’s name as Thomas Buckley and Sarah as Ishmael Yudle.

There is indeed a note in the margin which reads “ In Col.2 for “Yudle” substitute “Tattersall” and for the mark of Sarah “Yudle” substitute mark of Sarah “Tattersall”. Corrected on 1st day of September 1856 by me George Smith Registrar in the presence of James Buckley X who hereunto sets his mark, Sarah Buckley X who hereunto sets her mark”.

P1040168

So eleven weeks after their marriage Sarah changes her name on the marriage certificate. I can only speculate as to the reason. Perhaps her mother wasn’t happy that Ishmael Yudle was given as the father? Perhaps Ishamel Yudle wasn’t too keen either (if indeed he was aware)?

But then nearly ten months after marrying at Keighley Register Office in June 1856 James and Sarah marry again at Bingley Parish Church on 26 April 1857. Certainly some of the facts given on this 1857 marriage certificate are not correct.

Is this even legal – i’m sure it isn’t

One other interesting feature is that one of the witnesses to the 1856 marriage is Job Vickerman. In 1857 one of the witnesses is Mary Vickerman. A search of the 1851 census for Keighley reveals a Vickerman family with brother and sister Job and Mary – both in the same age range as James and Sarah. I think it’s a safe bet that these are the witnesses.

Perhaps Job wasn’t prepared to be a witness to a second and false marriage but persuaded his sister to do it – pure speculation on my part.

So what I thought was a straightforward case of an illegitimate ancestor resulted in a more interesting story.

Only a Genealogist regards a step backwards as progress.

Madness Monday – High Royds

Madness Monday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Madness Monday simply create a post with the main focus being an ancestor who either suffered some form of mental illness or an ancestor who might be hard to locate and drives you mad.

Although it’s not Mental Health Awareness Week 2017 in the UK until May I decided to add a blog post to the theme Madness Monday.

This was prompted by some of the results of searching the 1939 Register available on Find My Past.

I was surprised, or more truthfully saddened, to discover that I had three relatives in the West Riding Mental Hospital in Aireborough, West Yorkshire on 29 September 1939 – the date that the 1939 Register was completed.

Anyone local to Leeds and surrounding areas will know the place as High Royds or simply Menston (the area where the hospital was located) . Here’s a link to a website about High Royds Hospital  written in the early 1970’s by F E Rogers (a former employee at the hospital).

My three relatives who were patients at the time are:-

Marion Dawson (b 28 March 1905). She is my 2nd cousin 2x removed and her parents were John Dawson and Elizabeth Smith. Our common ancestors are Thomas Dawson and Margaret Snowden – my 3x great grandparents. I have no other information about Marion – she was only 5 at the time of the 1911 census – the only other available document before 1939 in which she was recorded.

I don’t know when she was admitted to hospital but at some point she was discharged from High Royds and lived until the age of 80 when she died in February 1986.

Selina Dawson (b 27 August 1877). She is my 1st cousin 2x removed and her parents were Martin Dawson and Margaret Spencer. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ellen Gawthrop – my 2x great grandparents. I found Selina in all the census returns from 1881 to 1911. She lived in a small geographical area between Keighley and Skipton throughout all those years – Steeton with Eastburn, Sutton in Craven and Glusburn.

In 1891 she worked as a “worsted spinner”; in 1901 she was described as “house keeper for father”; and in 1911 she was a “confectioner”.

I don’t know when Selina was admitted to High Royds. However her death is recorded in the September quarter of 1941 and registered in the Wharfedale district. This is the same registration district as Menston – so I suspect that Selina died in High Royds at the age of 64.

Watson Emmott Dawson (b 24 Jun 1887). He is my 2nd cousin 3x removed and his parents were Thomas Dawson and Jane Emmott. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson – my 4x great grandparents. I have Watson in the 1891 to 1911 census returns living in Cowling, West Yorkshire all these years. In 1901 Watson is described as an “errand boy” and in 1911 as “farmers son working on farm”.

As with Marion and Selina I don’t know when Watson was admitted to High Royds. I know that he died on 14 October 1944 and his death at the age of 57 is registered in the Wharfedale district – so I believe that he died in High Royds. Watson is buried at the Cowling Hill Baptist Chapel.

It is possible that Selina and Watson were discharged sometime after 1939 and readmitted to High Royds or it is equally possible that they both spent a considerable period of time as patients and died without ever being released. Either way not a very happy end to their lives.

Marion, Selina and Watson are not my only relatives to find themselves in a “mental hospital” or asylum. However I do wonder about the extent of their illness and if they knew they were all there together in 1939.

Military Monday – Arthur Dawson (1879-1944)

Arthur Dawson is my 1st cousin 2x removed – our common ancestors are my 2x great grandparents John Dawson and Ellen Gawthrop.

Arthur is the brother of Prince Dawson and John Dawson – his parents are John Dawson and Elizabeth Bradley. He was born 18 July 1879 and lived at Steeton with Eastburn about three miles from Keighley, West Yorkshire.

Before I found his WW1 service records I knew that Arthur married Lily Cockshott sometime in Q2 1906 and their marriage is recorded in the Keighley registration district. They had one child – a son, Eric born in 1909.

Arthur enlisted on 30 August 1916 in Keighley and was assigned to 7th West Yorkshire Regiment. His service number is 238029. He was 37 years old. At the time of his conscription he was living at 19 School Street, Steeton with Eastburn. His trade is given as ‘mason’.

The enlistment documents also show that Arthur had previous service in the Royal Engineers.

His service papers provided confirmation of the date of marriage to Lily – 10 April 1906. They also give Eric’s date of birth as 21 October 1909 – so more information for my tree. However his service record through up a bit of surprise. There is another son shown – Alan with a date of birth of 3 March 1911.

I have the 1911 census record for Arthur, Lily and Eric – but no Alan.

I have been able to find a birth for Alan Dawson at the right time and in the right location but no trace of him in the 1911 census. So, I searched for a death and found a record for Alan Dawson who died in Leeds in 1977 with a date of birth given as 3 April 1911.

Could this be the answer to my conundrum?  Maybe 3 March 1911 was incorrect. The 1911 census was undertaken on the night of 2 April 1911. So Alan could have been born the following day and that is why he is not recorded. I’m happy with this solution and have now added Alan to my family tree.

Anyway, back to Arthur and his war service.

It seems that Arthur was at home until 3 January 1917. The following day he embarked for France, returning home again after 105 days on 18 April 1917. There is reference to him serving in the Royal Defence Corps (RDC) – the role of this regiment was to provide security and guard duties inside the United Kingdom.

Arthur was finally discharged on 23 March 1919.

Searching for the graves

Holy Trinity Church, Cowling

I have a couple of weeks off work and thought I would make the most of my time on family history stuff.

So I spent all day yesterday updating and cross checking some research on a tree I am doing for a relative. I hardly moved from the computer screen from first thing in the morning until early evening.

Today I decided that I would get out in to the fresh air.

I dropped Jayne at the bus stop at about 6.45am and carried on to Cowling, near Keighley – a journey of about 26 miles. I had a flask of coffee, sandwiches and my camera. The plan was to hunt down some more gravestones.

I trawled through the National Burial Index recently and identified a number of relatives buried at Holy Trinity Church in Cowling and a couple at a small cemetery in Steeton with Eastburn not far from Cowling.

I had quite a long list including Dawson, Gawthrop and Snowden ancestors. I have to say that I wasn’t all that optimistic of finding very many headstones. And indeed that turned out to be right – I came home with only six names crossed off my list.

I am guessing that the graves I can’t find must all be without headstones. There were a great many of these. So I am thinking that perhaps the church will have a record of who is buried in which unmarked grave. There wasn’t anyone around today so I will have to follow this up later.

I was a bit more optimistic when I visited the small cemetery at Steeton with Eastburn. I was looking for the graves of two brothers – Arthur and Clement Dawson. Unfortunately I couldn’t find them either. And by now it had started to rain so I was feeling rather miserable.

I did manage to take a good photograph of Holy Trinity Church though. I have been on the look out for a postcard but haven’t seen one yet.

This is a Victorian church designed by Robert Dennis Chantrell and built in 1845. It is now a Grade II listed building.

The village of Cowling is Saxon in origin and is recorded in the Domesday Book as ‘Collinge’. The name means Coll’s people or tribe. At the time of the Norman Conquest the main landowner was Gamel who had very large land holdings in Yorkshire. His name survives in Gamsgill on the northern edge of the village.

Originally the village comprised three separate hamlets namely Ickornshaw, Middleton, Gill and Cowling Hill. It was only following the construction of the main Keighley to Colne Road and the building of large mills alongside the road that what is now regarded as the main village was constructed providing terraced cottage homes for the mill workers.

The older parts of the village faded in importance and as a result the parish church and village school are located on what appears to be the outskirts of the village between Ickornshaw and Middleton, the centre of the village having moved since their construction.