St. Peter’s

Tombstone Tuesday – James and Mary Ann Paley

James Paley and Mary Ann Paley (nee Spink) are my 2x great grandparents. They’ve only had very brief mentions in my blog up until now. So having recently found their gravestone at St Peter’s church in Rylstone, North Yorkshire it’s time to write about them.

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James Paley

James was born c1828 to parents William Paley and Mary Blackey. He was baptised on 23 March 1828 at Linton in Craven, Yorkshire.

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As far as I have been able to establish James was the third of at least six children – his siblings were:-

Thomas – baptised 20 June 1824
Mary – baptised 25 December 1825
William – baptised 11 April 1830
Francis – baptised 1 February 1835
John – baptised 2 May 1841

I have James on the 1841 census at Threshfield, Yorkshire and in 1851 at Drebley (about 5 miles from his home) living and working as a “farm labourer”

Mary Ann Spink

Mary Ann was born 20 June 1832 to parents John Spink and Sophia Shuttleworth Kitching. She was baptised 4 days later at Conistone, Yorkshire.

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Mary Ann was the first of at least seven children – her siblings were:-

Ellen – baptised 19 March 1834
James – baptised 1 May 1836
Joseph – born 11 March 1838 and baptised 15 March 1838
Sophia – baptised 8 September 1839
John – baptised 5 June 1841 and died early 1842
John – baptised 6 August 1843

I have Mary Ann in the 1841 census at home and in 1851 living and working in Keighley, West Yorkshire as a “servant”.

And that is where I thought I was going to move on and tell you about James and Mary Ann after they married. However, sometimes when you look at the records afresh you spot things you might have previously missed.

Searching the “Spink” baptisms in Conistone for this blog post I noticed one for Annie Elizabeth Spink on 18 June 1852. The baptism record shows the mother as Mary Anne Spink (spinster). Could it be that my Mary Ann became pregnant while living in Keighley and returned home to have her baby?

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Looking again at the 1861 census for John and Sophia Spink (Mary Ann’s parents) there is Ann Elizabeth Spink listed as “granddaughter”. I’m sure that I would have spotted that before but for some reason didn’t try to find out who the parents were – well now I know!! More research required about Annie Elizabeth I think.

Ok – back to James and Mary Ann. They married on 11 April 1857 at Conistone.

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Over the next eighteen years they had at least ten children:-

John – born 1857 and died 1858
Ellen – born 2 December 1858 (my great grandmother)
Mary – born 2 December 1858
Sophia – baptised 25 August 1861
James – born 20 January 1864
Margaret Ann – baptised 22 October 1865
William Thomas – born 21 October 1867
Martha Jane – born 24 January 1870
Betsy – born 19 December 1871
Francis – born and died 1875

I have James and Mary Ann on all the census returns from 1861 to 1901. James is variously described as a farmer, road contractor or general labourer. For all of their married life they lived in the village of Hetton in the Yorkshire Dales.

James died of bronchitis on 16 April 1903 – five days after their 47th wedding anniversary. He was 75 years of age.

Mary Ann lived for a further four months and died of angina on 18 August 1903 at the age of 71. In her will she left effects valued at £451 6s 2d to her son James.

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Markby – Postcard #10

This is a postcard of St. Peter’s church at Markby in Lincolnshire.  The church has no family significance at all – I just really like it so I bought the postcard.

The postcard is unused and is part of the “celesque series” published by The Photochrom Co Ltd.

St. Peter’s is one of the few remaining thatched churches in the UK and the only one in Lincolnshire.  Here is an article from The Telegraph written in August 2007 about “The surprise of thatched churches”.

Markby village is situated 3½ miles from Alford and consists of about two dozen properties. The church stands on the site of an old Augustinian Priory, and in fact is partly built of stone rescued from the priory ruins.

After the founding of the priory in 1160, the local people were encouraged by the Canons to use the Priory Church.  On the Dissolution of the Monasteries by Henry VIII they obtained permission, first to use a comer of the old priory and then in 1611 to build the present church.  In the first instance the roof was tiled, but in 1672 Richard White, churchwarden, substituted a thatch, taking the tiles as payment.

By the late 19th Century St. Peter’s was in a sorry state and incapable of being used regularly so a new corrugated iron church, “Christ Church”, was erected near by – the old church being retained for funerals and the occasional wedding.  However by 1962 this “tin church” was rusting and irreparable so it was decided to renovate old St. Peter’s.

Today the interior of the church still bears traces of its history – the Norman dog-toothed decoration on the chancel arch, the former oak cross beam rescued from the roof bearing a date of 1611, together with the ancient font from the old parish church, the 13th Century rose sculpture and the 19th Century box pews.  More photo’s here.

The thatched roof was replaced in 2008.

Addingham – Postcard #5

This is a postcard of St. Peter’s church in Addingham, West Yorkshire. The card is unused and the condition is not very good. In fact I would go so far as to say that all is not as it seems at first glance.

The front of the postcard says that it is published by the Skipton Stationery Co. The back of the card appears to be from something else all together. There is an inscription which says – No 4046 published by Portland Post Card Co., Portland, Ore. and Seattle, Wash. (Made in Germany).

The Portland Post Card Co. (1908-1916) published many scenes from the American west coast including Alaska. They were the official publisher of postcards for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in 1909. But I doubt very much that they ever published a postcard of St. Peter’s church, Addingham.

I haven’t yet been able to find an image of Portland Post Card No. 4046. If anyone else happens to spot one I would be interested to have a look.

So then I have a postcard that is almost certainly not in its original state. Nevertheless I got it for the picture of the church so it adequately meets that requirement.

St. Peters, Addingham has its own website with lots of history about Christian worship on the site in three millennia dating back to the 9th century.

My interest in Addingham is that it is the birth place of my 2x great grandfather, John Stowell (1828-1885) and some of his siblings. They didn’t stay there very long and certainly by the time of the 1851 census they had moved across the Pennines to Burnley in Lancashire.

I haven’t yet been to the records office to look for the baptism’s of my Stowell ancestors but I am guessing that they were probably baptised at St. Peter’s.