Mary Dawson

Tuesday’s Tip – Probate Records

Tuesday’s Tip is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

What advice would you give to another genealogist or family historian, especially someone just starting out? Remember when you were new to genealogy? Wasn’t it great to find tips and tricks that worked for others?

Albert Edward Dawson is my 4th cousin 1x removed. His mother was Mary Dawson. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson, my 4x great grandparents.

As far as I can establish there was nothing significant or exceptional about Albert’s life. He was born on 12 January 1906 in Barrowford, Lancashire. In the 1911 census Albert is living at 42 Gordon Street, Colne, Lancashire, with his mother Mary, his widowed grandmother Ann Dawson (nee Hargreaves) and his uncle James (Mary’s brother).

I have a marriage for Albert sometime in the June quarter of 1931 in Burnley, Lancashire, to Doris Ainsworth.

In the 1939 Register Albert and Doris are living at 3 Park Hill, Barrowford, Lancashire. They are both described as a “cotton weaver.”

I haven’t been able to find a death record for Doris. It is possible that she remarried at some point. But I can’t find a matching record for a marriage either – so she remains a mystery for now.

However I have found a death for Albert Edward Dawson in Staincliffe, West Yorkshire, in the December quarter of 1972.

Straightforward on the face of it. However, my tip is to always check the probate records to see if there is a will. This can sometimes be very useful – you might find information about other relatives who are beneficiaries of the will; you might find that your relative died in a particular hospital or at home; you might find details of their last address; you should find some information about the value of the estate; and you might find other interesting information.

Which is precisely what happened in the case of Albert Edward Dawson. Below is the entry from the England & Wales National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations) from www.ancestry.co.uk

albert-edward-dawson-probate

You will see that I now have the last known address of Albert at the time of his death – 1 Park Lane Cottages, Cowling, Keighley. Also that he was last known to be alive on 23 October 1972 and his dead body was found on 30 October 1972.

I don’t know the circumstances of his death or where his body was found.

There doesn’t appear to be anything in the newspaper archives at www.findmypast.co.uk. I have been to the library at Skipton to search their newspaper archives because some of the local papers are not included in the Find My Past records.

So far I haven’t been able to find any report of Albert going missing or of his dead body being found in suspicious circumstances or otherwise.

However I only know that there is something unusual about his death because of the information available from the probate records. So remember that the probate records can be a valuable genealogy resource.

Military Monday – William Dawson (1880-1939)

William Dawson is my great grandfather’s cousin. Our common ancestors are my 4x great grandparents John Dawson and Ann Watson.  He was born in Cowling, West Yorkshire on 9 October 1880 to parents Matthew Dawson and Ann Brigg.

William married Lucilla Whitaker on 29 February 1912. They had two children

• Matthew – born 19 September 1912

• Mary – born 9 March 1914

On 28 May 1918 William enlisted in Halifax at the age of 37 years 213 days. He was assigned to the 6th West Riding Regiment. At the time of his enlistment he was working as a ‘warp dresser’. His service number was 52089.

According to his service papers on www.ancestry.co.uk William left for France on 12 October 1918. He returned to England less than six weeks later on 20 November 1918 having received ‘gun shot wounds’ to both his thighs.

William was finally discharged on 6 May 1919 under King’s Regulation 392 (xvi) being no longer physically fit for war service.

The extract below indicates the degree of William’s disablement – and I think it says 38%. There are also some details of his pension and it looks like he was awarded £0.8s.3d per week from 7 May 1919 to be reviewed after 52 weeks. Also an allowance of £0.3s.6d per week for his two children from 26 May 1919.

William died about twenty years later – his death is registered in Q3 of 1939.