Martin Gawthrop

Wedding Wednesday – William Wallbank and Florence M Smith

William Wallbank is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. His parents are Ernest Wallbank and Sarah Rushton. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley – my 3x great grandparents.

William was born in Cowling, West Yorkshire on 27 August 1908.

On Thursday 1 June 1933 William married Florence M Smith at Christ Church, Colne, Lancashire. The wedding was announced in the Nelson Leader on Friday 2 June 1933 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Wallbank & Florence Smith - Nelson Leader 2 June 1933.png

COLNE FARMING FAMILIES UNITED

Two well-known Colne farming families were united at Christ Church, Colne, yesterday, the bridegroom being Mr. William Wallbank, of Higher Clough Farm, and the bride, Miss Florence Smith, elder daughter of Mr. Herbert and the late Mrs. Smith, of Tock Hill Farm.
The bride, given away by her uncle, Mr. E. Stansfield, of Morecambe, wore a beaute satin gown with wreath and veil. She was attended by her sister, Miss M. Smith, and Miss Annie Wallbank, sister of the bridegroom, both wearing mauve georgette with silver leaf head-dresses and shoes to tone. The bride carried pink roses and the bridesmaid’s bouquets were of sweet peas. Mr. L. Smith, brother of the bride, was best man.
Following a reception at Higher Clough Farm, Mr. and Mrs. Wallbank left for Morecambe for their honeymoon.

Wedding Wednesday – Wilfred Gawthrop and Alice Margaret Hacking

Wilfred Gawthrop is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Joseph Gawthrop and Mary Ellen Snowden. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley – my 3x great grandparents.

Wilfred was born on 1 July 1892 in Trawden, Lancashire.

In the 1911 census Wilfred was working as a “shop assistant to butcher”. By the time of the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2, Wilfred was a “master butcher”.

On 23 April 1935 Wilfred married Alice Margaret Hacking at St. Michael and All Angels’ Church, Foulridge, Lancashire. Details of the wedding were in the Nelson Leader on 26 April 1935 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Wilfred Gawthrop and Alice Margaret Hacking - Nelson Leader 26 April 1935.png

A Pretty Wedding

On Tuesday last, a very pretty wedding was solemnized at St Michael and All Angels’ Church, Foulridge, by the Vicar (Rev J Gough MA), the contracting parties being Mr Wilfred Gawthrop, eldest son of the late Mr Gawthrop and Mrs Gawthrop, of 85, Keighley Road, Colne, and Miss Alice Margaret Hacking, eldest daughter of the late Mr C L Hacking and Mrs Hacking, of “Micklethorn,” Foulridge. The bride, who was given away by her uncle, Mr Giles Collinge, was most charmingly dressed in an ivory silk ninon gown with a Brussels net veil and wreath of orange blossom, with shoes to tone. She carried a wreath of Madonna lillies. The train bearers were Miss B Gawthrop and Miss E Gawthrop (nieces of the bridegroom). She was attended by her sister Miss F M Hacking, and Mrs T Bannister (Blackpool), matron of honour, cousin of the bride, who were attired in dresses of pastel shades of Brussels net, with hats and shoes to tone, and carried bouquets of tulips. Mr J Pickles (friend of the bridegroom) acted as best man, and Mr T Bannister (Blackpool), cousin of the bride, was groomsman.
The hymn “Gracious spirit, Holy Ghost,” was sung, and Mr C Spencer, officiating at the organ, played Mendelssohn’s Wedding March. Mr A Hargreaves, rang a peal on the bells. A reception was held at the Cross Keys, East Marton.
The happy couple were the recipients of many handsome and useful presents. Mr and Mrs Gawthrop later left for a tour of the South, where the honeymoon is being spent.

Sunday’s Obituary – William Riley (1860-1929)

William Riley is my 1st cousin 3x removed. His parents are John Riley and Ann Gawthrop. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley (my 3x great grandparents).

William was born in Colne, Lancashire sometime in the last quarter of 1860. He was the first child of John and Ann Riley and he had three younger sisters – Ann, Mary and Margaret.

In the 1861 census the family are living at Garth Holme, Colne.

William’s father, John, died in 1866 at the age of 26. So by the time of the next census in 1871 Ann was a widow with four young children. She was working as a worsted weaver. These would have been really difficult times for Ann and the children.

Not surprisingly, sometime in the June quarter of 1873 Ann married John Hodgson and they had three children. John, Ann and the seven children are together in the 1881 census at Belle Vue, Great & Little Marsden, Lancashire.

In the 1881 census William is listed as a warp dresser – an occupation he would keep until his death.

Just over three years later on the 6 November 1884 William married Ellen Fletcher at St John the Evangelist church Great Marsden. Over the next 16 years they had six children – but sadly two of the first three died in infancy.

At some point around the start of the 20th century William became active in the newly formed Labour Party. He was first elected as an unopposed candidate to Nelson Town Council on Tuesday 10 November 1903 – see report from the Burnley Gazette of 14 November 1903 below (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Riley - Burnley Gazette 14 Nov 1903.png

On Tuesday, another Labour candidate was given a walk-over at Nelson. The vacancy was in Central Ward, and was caused by the elevation of Councillor Reed to the Aldermanic Bench. It was thought that Mr. S. Davies (C), a former member of the Council, would have contested the ward, but, beaten before by the Labour element, he was evidently not inclined to come forward again. The unopposed candidate was Mr. William Riley, warp-dresser. There must be four or five warp-dressers on the Council now.

William remained active in the local community until his death on 11 August 1929.

The Burnley Express published the following obituary on Wednesday 14 August 1929 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Riley - Burnley Express 14 Aug 1929.png

NELSON ALDERMAN’S DEATH

A GREAT HOSPITAL ORGANSIER

By the death of Alderman William Riley, who died at his home, 93 Clayton Street, last Sunday night, Nelson has sustained the loss of one of its best public workers and a gentleman who had earned general respect. He will be long remembered as the first salaried organising secretary of the Reedyford Hospital, a position to which he was appointed in March, 1920, and his duties were to organise the raising of funds for the maintenance of the hospital, which came into vogue during the war, when most useful service was rendered to the wounded soldiers who were temporarily accommodated there. At the time of his appointment there were practically no funds available, and Alderman Riley at once initiated schemes with the object of raising money. He worked out a weekly voluntary contributory scheme for the mills and workshops, with the result that when he resigned early in September of last year, as the result of failing health, there were no fewer than 8000 contributors. The fact that the work people’s contributions were so well maintained during the long period of trade depression was a tribute to his persistent energy and resourcefulness. His position necessitated tact as well as dogged perseverance, but Alderman Riley succeeded admirably in surmounting all difficulties, and, on his resignation, he fully deserved the expression of gratitude for his lengthy and valuable service.

Alderman Riley, who was 68 years of age, had also had extensive service on the Nelson Town Council, of which he originally became a member in the Labour interest in 1903. After ten intervening years he was again elected as a representative of Southfield Ward, retaining his position as a councillor until 1927, when he was promoted to the Aldermanic Bench. As a public representative, he was ever a zealous and conscientious worker, and at the time of his death he was a member of the General Purposes, Finance, Gas, Water, and Baths, Watch, Parks, and Free Library, and Electricity, Light Railway, and Omnibuses Committees. 

He was formerly a warp dresser, and was a member of the committee of the Nelson and District Warp Dressers’ Association. He was connected with the Baptist cause at Carr Road Church, with which he had a long association.

I think that is a fitting tribute to someone who gave many years to public service.

Wedding Wednesday – Benjamin Gawthrop and Jane Hargreaves

Benjamin Gawthrop is my 1st cousin 3x removed. His parents are Benjamin Gawthrop and Elizabeth Eastwood. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley – my 3x great grandparents.

I have written previously about Benjamin herehere and here.

On 16 May 1895 Benjamin married Jane Hargreaves and the marriage was announced in the Burnley Express on 18 May 1895 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Benjamin Gawthrop & Jane Hargreaves - Burnley Express 18 May 1895.png

MARRIAGE OF A FORMER BURNLEY STUDENT – On Thursday the nuptials of Rev. Benjamin Gawthorpe and Miss Jane Hargreaves were celebrated at Ebenezer Chapel, Colne Road. Mr Gawthorpe, it will be remembered, was one of those young men who went out from Ebenezer Chapel to study for the Baptist pulpit, and secured a place as minister at Heaton Chapel, Newcastle-on-Tyne, where he now officiates. The bride has always been a good worker in connection with the above place, being a member of the chapel and Sunday school choirs; she was, besides, a teacher in the school, and was very much esteemed by her scholars. In the chapel were a large number of relatives and friends who wished the couple every success. The officiating ministers were the Rev. S C Allderidge and the Rev. J J Hargreaves. The best man was the Rev. W H Holdsworth, M.A., and the bridesmaids were the two sisters of the bride. The Rev. R Boothman, of Clitheroe, and the Revs. J Walker and W Smith, of Rawdon College, were also present. The bride was given away by her uncle, Mr Richard Smith. After the ceremony the “Wedding March” was played, and then all the guests, to the number of about 80, sat down to a repast, and then spent the rest of the day in a sociable manner. The couple are the resipients of a great many beautiful presents, among them being a very pretty music stand from the bridegroom’s uncle, Mr Gawthorpe, of Sabden. The honeymoon is being spent at Lytham.

Sunday’s Obituary – George Ernest Jackson and Elizabeth Ann Jackson (nee Gawthrop)

Elizabeth Ann Gawthrop is my 1st cousin 3x removed. Her parents are Israel Gawthrop  and Mary Ann Hargreaves. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley – my 3x great grandparents.

Elizabeth was born on 4 April 1864 at Higham, near Padiham, in Lancashire.

At the age of 25 she married George Ernest Jackson on 19 June 1889 at St Nicholas Church, Sabden, Lancashire.

George and Elizabeth had three children:-
Harry – born 18 November 1890
Florence Mary – born 20 May 1893
Ernest J – born 7 May 1897

George and Elizabeth lived in Padiham where George was a cotton manufacturer and owned a mill there. When George retired from the business they moved to Lytham St Annes, near Blackpool.

George passed away on 10 July 1933. The Burnley Express of 15 July 1933 carried a brief obituary (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

George Ernest Jackson - Burnley Express 15 July 1933.png

DIED IN RETIREMENT

FORMER PADIHAM MANUFACTURER

Formerly a cotton manufacturer in Padiham for about 22 years, the death occurred at his residence, “The Anchorage,” East Beach, Lytham St. Annes, last Tuesday night, of Mr. George Ernest Jackson. He was a native of Sabden, and was the managing director of the Sabden Calico Printing Company. At Padiham he owned the Industry and Enterprise Mills, and was well-known as a great lover of horses. Retiring 22 years ago, he went to Lytham, and was a member of the Lytham Conservative Club. He was a past president of the Lytham Subscription Bowling Club, and a past captain of Lytham Green Golf Club. Mr. Jackson is survived by a widow, two sons and a daughter.

Elizabeth moved to Ripon after the death of her husband. She died in January 1936 and the Burnley Express reported this on 25 January 1936 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Elizabeth A Jackson (nee Gawthrop) - Burnley Express 25 january 1936.png

DIED IN RIPON – Many people in Padiham will regret to learn of the death at her residence in Ripon of Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Jackson, widow of Mr. George Ernest Jackson, a former well known cotton manufacturer, of Enterprise Mills, Padiham. Mrs. Jackson, who was 70 years of age, had resided in Ripon about three years. She is survived by two sons and a daughter. The interment took place in the family vault in St. Cutherbert’s Churchyard, Lytham.

Sunday’s Obituary – Frank Coulston (1945-1949)

Frank Coulston is my 4th cousin. His parents are George Edward Coulston and Janet Petty. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley – my 3x great grandparents.

Frank was born sometime in the fourth quarter of 1945 and his birth is registered at Nelson in Lancashire.

Sadly Frank had a very short life as the result of a tragic accident. The Barnoldswick & Earby Times of 26 August 1949 reported on the inquest held on Tuesday 23 August (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Frank Coulston - Barnoldswick & Earby Times 26 August 1949.png

Boy Drowned in Lodge

CORONER’S APPRECIATION OF RESCUE EFFORTS

“He was only after tadpoles,” said Mr John Ingham, a witness at the inquest held in Colne Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday on Frank Coulston aged three, of 8 Beech Street, Colne, who was drowned in Castle Hill Lodge on Saturday morning. The East Lancashire Deputy Coroner, Mr R H Rowland, returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”
Mrs Janet Coulston, the boy’s mother, stated that she was in Stafford at the time of the accident and had left the child in the care of his grand-mother.
John Stanford Hall, aged eight, of 9 Maple Street, Colne, told the Coroner that he and his brother were playing with Frank Coulston on the bank of the lodge. “Frank was walking backwards and fell into the water,” he said. Witness added that he ran into a nearby garden for help.
John Ingham, 14 Spruce Street, Colne, told the Coroner that he heard Hall saying “Frank is in the lodge.”
The Coroner: What did you do?
Mr Ingham: I told the boy to run and tell someone, and I dashed straight there. Frank was floating in the water some distance from the side.
The Coroner: You jumped in with your clothes on and got him out? – Yes.
Were you out of your depth? – It was shallow near the bank, but I was out of my depth when I got to him.
In answer to further questions, Mr Ingham said that he tried artificial respiration on the boy, with no success, and later Mr Dennis Quinland who is a qualified ambulance man took over and tried to revive Coulston.
Dennis Quinland, of 43 Lenches Road, stated that there was every appearance that the boy was dead when he saw him.

NOT REGARDED AS TRESPASSING
Police Constable George Mills gave evidence that he arrived soon after Mr Quinland had begun artificial respiration. He said that the lodge was about a quarter of a mile from the boy’s home, and that it was easy to gain access to the water. Quite a number of children played near the lodge, and that was not regarded as trespassing.
Summing up, the Coroner said he was satisfied that the boy fell into the water accidentally, perhaps losing his balance when he was walking backwards. “There is no question of skylarking or of the action of any other person,” he added. “I would like to place on record my appreciation of Mr Ingham’s effort in jumping into the water fully clothed when he was clearly out of his depth. Everyone who has been connected with this accident has acted most creditably.” The Coroner commended John Hall for the way in which he had given evidence, and also mentioned a third person, Mr John Burnett, of 30 Regent Street, Nelson, who had tried to resuscitate the boy.
After the inquest Mrs Coulston asked the Coroner if the lodge could be made safe. The Coroner replied that he was not concerned with that aspect.
Mrs Coulston: Well, who is? Surely something can be done.
The Coroner: I have every sympathy with you, but after all it is your child and he was a quarter of a mile away from home.
Mr T S M Badgery on behalf of the owners of the lodge, also expressed his sympathy, saying that children occasionally got into mischief, often with tragic results.

In December 1949 John Ingham received the Royal Humane Society’s Honorary Testimonial for attempting to save Frank.

Sunday’s Obituary – Ernest Wallbank (1886-1944)

Ernest Wallbank is the husband of my 2nd cousin 2x removed, Sarah Ruston. Sarah’s parents are William Ruston and Ann Gawthrop. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley, my 3x great grandparents.

Ernest was born on 19 November 1886 at Earby, Yorkshire. He married Sarah Rushton sometime in the June quarter of 1908 – the marriage is registered in Skipton, Yorkshire.

Ernest and Sarah had two children – William and Annie.

In the 1911 census Ernest’s occupation is “farmer” and the family are living at Lower Clough Farm near Colne, Lancashire. By the time of the 1939 Register the family are at Higher Clough Farm near Colne and Ernest is a “dairy farmer”.

Ernest passed away on 2 January 1944 – his death was reported in the Barnoldswick & Earby Times on 14 January.

Ernest Wallbank - Barnoldswick & Earby Times 14 Jan 1944.png

Death of Mr Ernest Wallbank.

The funeral took place at Colne Cemetery on Thursday afternoon of last week of Mr Ernest Wallbank, of Higher Clough Farm, near Black Lane Ends, whose death occurred on the 2nd inst., at the age of 58 years. Much regret has been expressed at his passing and sympathy with his widow and the one son and daughter who survive him. Mr Wallbank was well known and highly esteemed, particularly in farming circles. He had many friends in Colne, where he had an extensive milk round. The Rev R A Jones officiated at a service at the house and also at Colne Cemetery. Floral tributes were received from the following: “In loving memory of a dear husband and father,” from his sorrowing wife and daughter; “In loving memory of a dear father,” Willie and Florence; “To dear grandad,” his two little pets, June and Eileen; Linda and John Thomas; Sister Libby; Jim and Mary; Mary, Winnie and Mary; All at Lingah (Crosshills); All at Piked Hedge and Harold; Mrs Rushton and Edith; Mr and Mrs J Driver and family; Linda, Norman and Doreen; Dick and Rennie; All at Hall Hill Farm; Mr and Mrs Crabtree and Allen; Mr and Mrs F Mellin and Mary; Mr and Mrs T Marsh; Mr and Mrs George Cowling, Keith and Elsie; Mr and Mrs S Proctor; Mr and Mrs R Smith and Mr and Mrs J Emmott; The neighbours and friends. Mr R Wood, Skelton Street, Colne, carried out the arrangements.

In his will Ernest left effects totalling £3401 0s 1d to his wife Sarah and son William.