lincolnshire

Wedding Wednesday – Eveline Ivy Coulam and Charles Carter

Eveline Ivy Coulam is my wife’s 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Charles Coulam and Priscilla Rowbotham. Their common ancestors are James Padley and Sarah Bradshaw – my wife’s 3x great grandparents.

Eveline was born on 3 April 1920 – her birth is registered at Gainsborough, Lincolnshire.

In September 1939 Eveline married Charles Carter – the marriage is registered at Boston, Lincolnshire. In the 1939 Register they are living at Lade Bank, Olivers Lane, Boston. Charles is described as a “farm worker” and Eveline as a “land worker”.

The Lincolnshire Standard and Boston Guardian of 23 September 1939 carried a report of the wedding (taken from British Newspaper Archives website).

Eveline Coulam - Lincolnshire Standard and Boston Guardian 23 September 1939.pngTHE MARRIAGE of Miss Evelyn Ivy Coulam, fourth daughter of Mr and Mrs Charles Coulam, Leake, Lade Bank, with Mr Charles Carter, youngest son of Mr J Carter and the late Mrs Carter, Midville, was solemnised at the Parish Church on Saturday. The Vicar (Rev A Gibbons) officiated at the ceremony. The bride, given in marriage by her father, wore a pretty frock of turquoise satin, with gold trimmings, with a coronet of golden velvet leaves, and her shoes and gloves in matching shade, while in charming colour contrast her bouquet was of pink dahlias and fern. Miss Rosemary Coulam, sister, as bridesmaid, was attired in a dainty frock of pink crepe-de-chine, with head-dress of gold leaves, and shoes and gloves of matching colour, and carried a bouquet of blue scabious and fern. The duties of best man were discharged by Mr Harry Moore, Tumby (‘groom’s friend). As the bridal pair left the church, little Rita Pinner (bride’s niece) presented a silver horse-shoe. The reception was held at the home of Mr and Mrs C Coulam, Lade Bank, where relations and friends were entertained. Many good presents were received. Mr and Mrs C Carter will reside at Lade Bank.

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Black Sheep Sunday – Hilda Maskell (nee Coulam)

Hilda Coulam is my wife’s 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are George Coulam and Sarah Ann Turner. Their common ancestors are James Padley and Sarah Bradshaw – my wife’s 3x great grandparents.

Hilda was born on 2 January 1911 at Tathwell, near Louth in Lincolnshire.

Sometime in the fourth quarter of 1932 Hilda married George Maskell – their marriage is registered in Louth.

Hilda appeared before Louth Borough Magistrates in July 1952 as reported in the Louth and North Lincolnshire Advertiser on 26 July (taken from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Hilda Maskell - Louth and North Lincolnshire Advertiser 26 July 1952.png

BOXED SCHOOL-BOY’S EARS

Louth Woman Bound Over By Court

While two children held him, a Louth woman hit a nine-year-old boy whom she thought had struck her own daughter with a cricket bat, it was alleged at Louth Borough Magistrates’ Court yesterday (Thursday). The woman, Mrs Hilda Maskell, of 31 Abbey Road, Louth, summoned for assaulting and battering the boy, was bound over to be of good behaviour for 12 months in the sum of £5.
The summons was preferred by Mrs Ellen Windle, mother of the boy, who was represented by Mr S Harmston. Capt. R H Helmer appeared for Mrs Maskell and entered a pleas of not guilty.
“This summons,” Mr Harmston told the Bench, “is brought to teach adults that they cannot take the law into their own hands and assault little children, whatever has happened.”

BOY’S STORY
Nine-year-old John Windle said that he left school on July 15th with Raymond Grebby, and added that he knew children named Ernie Taylor and Ingrid Spix.
“Mrs Maskell said something to them, and then Ingrid and Ernie came running after me and caught hold of me,” he alleged. “Mrs Maskell came and hit me on the face and then on the head. They held me while she hit me. She used a swear word to me.”
The boy added that he knew Maureen Maskell but said he had not hurt her at any time.
Mrs Maskell hit him four or five times on the face and then on the head. It hurt but he did not cry.
Answering Capt. Helmer, the boy said he had a cricket bat with him but denied hitting Maureen Maskell with it. He said he had never touched the girl and had not sworn at Mrs Maskell.

“GAVE HIM GOOD CLIP”
Sheila Addison (9), of 12 Abbey Road, Louth, said she saw the children holding John Windle. Mrs Maskell hit him four or five times while he was being held.
Raymond Grebby, 60 St Bernard’s Avenue, Louth, said he left school with John. He saw a boy hitting Maureen Maskell, but John did not hit her. He told Capt. Helmer that the boy who hit the girl also had a bat, as well as John. “John didn’t hit her because he was with me,” he said.
Mrs Dorothy Margaret Fieldsend, of 30 Abbey Road, Louth, appearing on subpoena, said she was looking out of her window when she saw children chasing John Windle. “The next thing I looked up and saw Mrs Maskell was giving him a good clip across the ear,” she added.
Mrs Ellen Windle, of 28 Broadley Crescent, the boy’s mother, said as she was going home Sheila Addison and Mrs Fieldsend spoke to her. When she got home she saw that John’s face was “all red, and so was his head.”
She told Capt. Helmer that she had had a complaint about John, who got blamed for a lot he did not do.The complaint had been made by Mr Maskell, witness told Mr Harmston.

“GIRL HIT WITH BAT”
First witness for the defence, Mrs Ethel May Willoughby, of 19 Abbey Road, Louth, said she was speaking to John Windle when three little girls came up. John chased them with a cricket bat – “a large one” – and hit Maureen with it. She ran off crying.
“I have no doubt he was the boy,” witness continued. “Mrs Maskell walked down the road, caught John and smacked his ears two or three times. “I should most probably have done the same thing had it been my little girl,” she added.
Mr Harmston: You don’t like John, do you? – I like all children.
Answer my question. You don’t like John? – There are a lot of children I’m not exactly fond of.
And John is one of them? – Yes.
Mrs Willoughby added that she had several times stopped other children hitting the boy.

“LAUGHED AT ME”
Mrs Hilda Maskell said that when Maureen arrived home she was crying. “I went up to John,” she said. “Two children were holding him. He had a cricket bat, and I boxed him on the ears and said “Perhaps that will teach you a lesson for the future.” He turned round and laughed at me.” The boy had previously used bad language, she alleged.
Mr Harmston: Did you see John hit Maureen? – No.
Did you ask John if he had hit Maureen? – No.
Did you think it right to hit this small boy while he was being held? – No, I don’t think so. I did it under very great stress.
Capt. Helmer, making his submission, commented: “Young people nowadays seem to imagine that they can behave as they like, and if anyone looks at them or touches them they can be summoned for assault.

CHAIRMAN’S ADVICE
“You have seen the little boy. All they want is a tinsel halo and a pair of wings to allow him to float away. We don’t hear of Master John crying after his ears are boxed, but we do know that the little girl was crying.”
But, added Capt. Helmer, there must be a technical offence. It might be a pity to take the law into one’s own hands, but if more people did so there would not be so much juvenile delinquency, he added.
After the Bench had retired the chairman, Ald. A E Maxey, pointed out to Mrs Windle that she had admitted that there had been a complaint against her son. “You must take the boy under hand and stop him.” he added.
The chairman told Mrs Maskell: “We find you guilty. You know you must not take the law into your own hands, however you feel about it. If everyone took notice of your advocate we should have the Court full every time.”
Mrs Maskell was then bound over and ordered to pay 4/- costs.

 

Sunday’s Obituary – Edward Dixon (1910-1939)

Edward Dixon is my wife’s 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are William Rylatt Dixon and Sarah Ann Britliff. Their common ancestors are John Britliff and Sarah Rack, my wife’s 3x great grandparents. See previous posts about John Britliff here and here.

Edward was born on 18 May 1910 in Kendal, Westmorland.

At some point between 1910 and 1939 Edward, together with his parents and sister, moved from Kendal to Grantham in Lincolnshire. Edward’s father was employed as a “railway carter drayman” so perhaps he moved with his job.

I have no more information about Edward until the following report in the Grantham Journal on 15 December 1939 about his death.

Grantham Journal 15 Dec 1939.png

RAILWAY GUARD AT HELLIFIELD

Young Grantham Man’s Death

After an illness lasting some six months the death occurred last week of Mr Edward Dixon, son of Mr and Mrs W R Dixon, of 29 Swinegate, Grantham, at the comparatively young age of 29 years.

Deceased was employed as a guard on the LMS Railway at Hellifield, Yorks.

The funeral took place on Monday, a service at the parish church, conducted by the Vicar, Canon C H Leake, preceding the interment in the cemetery, where the last rites were conducted by the Rev C L G Hutchings.

The mourners were:- Father and mother; Miss A Dixon, sister; Miss Shepherd, fiancee; Mr and Mrs s Dixon, Sibsey, Miss Maplethorpe, Lincoln, cousins; Mr J Shepherd, Burnley; and Mr L Huff, representing the LMS Railway at Hellifield.

The floral tributes were sent by father, mother and sister; aunt and cousins at Sibsey; uncle and cousin at Lincoln; Elenor; Mr and Mrs Shepherd, Burnley; Mr and Mrs Felstead; Mr and Mrs Rowland; Mr and Mrs Woods; Mr and Mrs Harrison, Signal Road; Mr and Mrs Bibby, Eliza and Ethel, Skipton; Miss Staniland, and Mrs Golding; fellow members of the LMS Railway at Hellifield; Mr and Mrs Morris; Mr and Mrs Woolmer and family; Mr and Mrs R W Savage; Phyllis; M A and A E Wilson and Miss Odom; Mrs C G Hardy; Mr and Mrs Thomas and Mr and Mrs Williams; Mrs Walters; Mr and Mrs W W Winn; Mrs Raines and family; Miss M E Barkes; Mr and Mrs Dixon, Kirkby Stephen.

Black Sheep Sunday – Fred Gostelow (1863-1921)

Black Sheep Sunday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Black Sheep Sunday simply create a post with the main focus being an ancestor with a “shaded past.”

Fred Gostelow is my wife’s great grand uncle – brother of her great grandmother Sarah Ann Gostelow.

Fred was born in 1863 to parents Samuel Gostelow and Emma Padley, my wife’s 2x great grandparents. His birth is registered in Q4 at Spilsby, Lincolnshire.

In the 1881 census Fred is working as a farm servant and living and working at Brick Kilns Farm, Broughton, Lincolnshire.

In 1887 Fred married Alice Stuffins sometime in the June quarter – the marriage is registered at Caistor, Lincolnshire.

It was during this period that Fred got in to trouble and found himself the subject of report in the Lincolnshire Chronicle of 8 July 1887.

Lincolnshire Chronicle - 8 July 1887.png

Blyborough – At the Lindsey Quarter Sessions at Lincoln, on Friday, before Sir C H J Anderson and other Magistrates, Fred Gostelow, farm servant, aged 23, was indicted for stealing a purse, a £5 bank note, and three sovereigns, the property of Albert Scott, at Blyborough, on the 14th May. The jury found the prisoner guilty and recommended him to mercy on account of his previous good character. The Court, taking into consideration the recommendation of the jury, sentenced the prisoner to two calendar months’ imprisonment with hard labour, a sentence which the Chairman described as very lenient.

So not the perfect start to married life.

Fred and Alice had five children:-

Ethel – born 20 March 1888
Walter – born 1 January 1890
William – born 11 December 1892
Wilfred – born & died about March 1896
Cyril – born about March 1897 – died in WW1

Between 1891 and 1911 the family lived in Barnetby, Lincolnshire.

Fred passed away towards the end of 1921 – his death is registered in the December quarter.

Alice remarried at the age of 58 in 1924 to Joseph K Smith. I haven’t located a death registration yet for her.

Black Sheep Sunday – John Britliff (The Killing Field)

John Britliff is my wife’s 3x great grandfather. His name appears in records under various spellings – Britliff, Britliffe and Britcliffe. There are also numerous transcription interpretations from the census returns on both Ancestry and Find My Past. This certainly makes finding and following the family a bit tricky sometimes.

John was born about 1800 in or around Bonby, North Lincolnshire. I have his mother as Mary Britliff but have not been able to find a record of who his father might be.

On 26 November 1821 John married Sarah Rack in North Kelsey, Lincolnshire. They had at least ten children between 1824 and 1840.

In the 1841 census the family are living at North Owersby, Lincolnshire and John is working as an agricultural labourer. There are eight children at home.

Lincolnshire Chronicle Dec 1842

About twenty months later tragedy occurred as reported in the Lincolnshire Chronicle on Friday 2 December 1842.

A Wife killed by her Husband – On Sunday last, a tragical event took place at North Gullum farm, in the parish of North Owersby, near Market Rasen. A labourer of the name of John Britcliffe had some angry words with his wife, when in the moment of passion, he first beat her with a leathern belt, and then brutally kicked her on the lower part of the body. The unfortunate woman, who was far advanced in pregnancy, survived this ill-treatment but a few hours. An inquest was held on the deceased on Monday, before Mr. Marris, coroner, and a post mortem examination of the body by Mr. Smith and Mr. Hutchinson, of Caistor, surgeons, and after a long and patient investigation, the jury returned a verdict of manslaughter, and Britcliffe has been committed under the coroner’s warrant for trial at the next assizes. A family of nine children are left to mourn the loss of both parents.

We can never know what happened between John and Sarah to cause this terrible tragedy but certainly the lives of all the family were changed for ever.

In January 1843 a report in the Lincolnshire Chronicle says that “the seven children of John Britliffe, late of North Owersby, at present a prisoner in Lincoln Castle, on a charge of manslaughter, chargeable to the parish of North Owersby, were ordered to be removed to Nettleton, being their last legal settlement”.

The children are likely to have been taken to the Caistor Workhouse.

John next appears in court on Wednesday 8 March 1843. The report of the hearing is in the Lincolnshire Chronicle of Friday 10 March 1843.

Manslaughter at North Owersby

John Britcliffe, 42, pleaded guilty to an indictment charging him with the manslaughter of his wife, Sarah Britcliffe. The prisoner received a good character from Mr. Brooks, a farmer at Croxby. 10 year’s transportation.

He was held in Lincoln Castle until the beginning of April 1843 when he was removed for transportation together with a number of other prisoners as the following report from the Lincoln Chronicle of Friday 7 April 1843 says.

TRANSPORTS – On Friday last, Lieut. Nicholson, governor of Lincoln castle, removed from thence the first portion of convicts sentenced to transportation at the last assizes, viz: to the Warrior hulk, Woolwich, John Nicholson, John Sims, John North, Edwd. Copeland, and John Butting for life; John Britcliffe, Leonard Boyall, and Ambrose Brown for ten years; David Dickenson and James Smith for seven years; to Pentonville model prison, William Potts and Hy. Scott.

There are various sets of records about convicts and transportation on family history and other websites. However I have not yet been able to find John Britcliffe in any of these. So  I don’t know where he was transported to – I am guessing Australia or Tasmania.

I really wanted to try and find out what happened after his transportation because eight years later John appears to be back in Lincolnshire. I have him in the 1851 census living at Hayes Farm in Redbourn and working as a shepherd.

This raises a whole host of questions for me, for example:-

  • Did he really get transported?
  • If he did get transported for 10 years how come he is back in England after 8 years?
  • Did he get a “certificate of freedom” for good behaviour after serving part of his sentence?
  • How did he afford the fare back to England?

Also in the 1851 census two of his children – Joseph (b 1840) and William (b 1839) are still at the Union Workhouse in Caistor.

The story becomes more interesting when this article about the Lindsey court sessions of 4 & 5 July appears in the Stamford Mercury on Friday 11 July 1851.

Stamford Mercury Jul 1851

John Britliff, 50, who had been three times before in custody, was brought up, having been committed as “an incorrigible rogue and vagabond” for refusing to maintain his children. It appeared that the prisoner had left his family a burthen to the parish, which had spent £250 in their maintenance; but since he had been in prison he had paid  £5, and as he now promised to do his duty to the children, he was liberated upon the promise, being warned that if he neglected to carry it out he would be liable to be committed again.

In 1857 John married Esther Smith at Caistor. And in the 1861 census they are living at Town Street, Waddingham, Lincolnshire. Also living with them is John’s unmarried daughter Jane Britcliffe (b1839) and her daughter Sarah C Britcliffe (b1859).

John died sometime in the September quarter of 1862 – almost twenty years after killing his wife.

There is so much more to this story that I wish I could discover.

You can now read two more posts about this story here and here

Markby – Postcard #10

This is a postcard of St. Peter’s church at Markby in Lincolnshire.  The church has no family significance at all – I just really like it so I bought the postcard.

The postcard is unused and is part of the “celesque series” published by The Photochrom Co Ltd.

St. Peter’s is one of the few remaining thatched churches in the UK and the only one in Lincolnshire.  Here is an article from The Telegraph written in August 2007 about “The surprise of thatched churches”.

Markby village is situated 3½ miles from Alford and consists of about two dozen properties. The church stands on the site of an old Augustinian Priory, and in fact is partly built of stone rescued from the priory ruins.

After the founding of the priory in 1160, the local people were encouraged by the Canons to use the Priory Church.  On the Dissolution of the Monasteries by Henry VIII they obtained permission, first to use a comer of the old priory and then in 1611 to build the present church.  In the first instance the roof was tiled, but in 1672 Richard White, churchwarden, substituted a thatch, taking the tiles as payment.

By the late 19th Century St. Peter’s was in a sorry state and incapable of being used regularly so a new corrugated iron church, “Christ Church”, was erected near by – the old church being retained for funerals and the occasional wedding.  However by 1962 this “tin church” was rusting and irreparable so it was decided to renovate old St. Peter’s.

Today the interior of the church still bears traces of its history – the Norman dog-toothed decoration on the chancel arch, the former oak cross beam rescued from the roof bearing a date of 1611, together with the ancient font from the old parish church, the 13th Century rose sculpture and the 19th Century box pews.  More photo’s here.

The thatched roof was replaced in 2008.

Genealogy for schools in Lincolnshire

Here’s a couple of links to a schools genealogy project in Lincolnshire (UK).  The project is called Making History and is supported by actors Miriam Margolyes and Colin McFarlane.

There are 12 schools involved in the pilot and it is hoped it will then be rolled out across the country.

The project will help children discover who their ancestors are and they will have the chance to make their family history into a short film.

Sounds like a really exciting project.

This is Lincolnshire

BBC News Lincolnshire