Lancashire

Sunday’s Obituary – Sophia Paley (1861-1947)

Sophia Paley is my great grand aunt – in other words the sister of my great grandmother Ellen Paley.

Sophia was born on 31 July 1861 and baptised on 25 August 1861 in Rylstone, Yorkshire.

I haven’t been able to find Sophia on the 1871 census – she is certainly not at home with her parents. And I have checked the census returns for her grandparents and she is not there either.

In 1881 she is a domestic housemaid servant for a County Magistrate and cotton manufacturer in Skipton, Yorkshire.

By 1891 Sophia had moved south to Bromley in Kent, still working as a domestic housemaid servant – this time for a barrister. She remained in Bromley at least until the next census in 1901 when she was a parlour maid for a retired dealer in stocks and shares.

At some point over the next ten years Sophia had presumably earned sufficient money to leave domestic service. She had moved to Colne in Lancashire and was living in her own home. Her occupation is given as house keeper – own account. So I’m thinking she is maybe running a bed & breakfast type establishment – she has one person staying with her at the time.

Finally Sophia appears in the 1939 Register at Craven Cottage, Keighley Road, Colne and her occupation is described as occasional nursing.

Sophia passed away on 13 March 1947 at 2 Mayfield Avenue, Halifax, West Yorkshire. In her will she left effects totalling £647 18s 4d to Ernest Pearson, a solicitors managing clerk and Walter Pickles, a cotton manufacturer.

In the Barnoldswick & Earby Times of 11 April 1947 the following advert appears for the sale by auction of all Sophia’s household items.

Sophia Paley - Barnoldswick & Earby Times 11 April 1947.png

CRAVEN COTTAGE                                           OFF KEIGHLEY ROAD, COLNE                 (Heifer Lane Bus Stop)

Fred Smith, Auctioneer and Valuer, instructed by Executors of Miss Sophia Paley, will sell by Auction, at CRAVEN COTTAGE, COLNE, on SATURDAY, APRIL 12th, 1947: One Oak Dining Room Suite in green velvet, one Mahogany Drawing Room Suite in old gold figured velvet, one Inlaid walnut Bedroom Suite, one Maple Bedroom Suite, wardrobe and linen cupboard combined, full-length dressing mirror and commode; one Oak Gateleg Table, one Oak Antique Table, one Card Table, one Occasional Chair, one Mahogany Rocking Chair, one Antique Mahogany Table, one Inlaid Walnut Bedroom Suite, one Stand Table, one Walnut Fire Screen, one 4ft 6in Oak Bedstead, Spring Mattress and Hair Overlay, one Mahogany Plant Stand, one Maple Bedroom Table, one 4×3 Tapestry Carpet, one 4×3 Axminster Carpet, one 3×21/2 Axminster Carpet, one 3×3 tapestry Carpet, 2 Axminster Rugs, 12yds Wilton Stair Carpet, one Chrome-plated Carpet Sweeper, one Kitchen Leaf Table, one Onward Gas Oven, two Stools, one Night Commode, one China Tea Service (40 pieces), half Tuscan China Tea service (21 pieces), 15 Antique Tureens, Vases, Plates and Ornaments (Willow pattern), one part Dinner Service, one part Tea Service and various Cups, plates, Jugs, Pans and other Kitchen Utensils, Bed Linen, Sheets, Towels, Table Cloths and Window Curtains.

Sale at 1 o’clock.

The Auctioneer wishes to call your attention to this sale of very good Household Furniture.

Intending purchasers are requested to produce their Identity Cards.

View today (Friday, 2 to 4pm.

Fred Smith, Auctioneer & Valuer, Church Street Sale Rooms 9opposite Church), Colne.

A life sold by auction!

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Sunday’s Obituary – Joseph Musgrove (1864-1948)

Joseph Musgrove is my great grand uncle – in other words, brother of my great grandfather. His parents are John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth – my 2x great grandparents.

Joseph was born on 13 April 1864 in Darwen, Lancashire.

I have Joseph on all the census returns from 1871 to 1911 and in the 1939 Register. For most of these years his occupation was given as “labourer”. So I am guessing that he had a very hard working life.

On 16 May 1891Joseph married Bridget Maria Grainger at St. James Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire.

James and Bridget had eleven children between 1892 and 1911. The local paper published a story marking their golden wedding anniversary in 1941 – see blog post here.

Joseph passed away on 3 June 1948 and details of his death were published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 11 June 1948.

Joseph Musgrove Obituary - CAT 11 Jun 1948.png

MR JOSEPH MUSGROVE

Mr Joseph Musgrove of 66, Wilkin Street, Clitheroe who died yesterday week in his 85th year was one of the town’s best known characters.

He was a native of Darwen, but had spent most of his life in Clitheroe and a for a long number of years was employed in the Highways Department of the Corporation, retiring in 1932. For many years he was one of town’s halberd bearers.

Mr Musgrove was keenly interested in cricket and football and in April travelled to Rochdale to watch Clitheroe Football Club’s last away match of the season.

He was a member of the Royal Castle Lodge Ancient Order of Foresters and members of the order were present at the interment on Tuesday at St Mary’s Cemetery, conducted by the Rev J T Hall.

Mr Musgrove leaves a widow, three sons and three daughters who will have general sympathy in their bereavement.

Maritime Monday – Ernest William Espley (1904-1976)

Maritime Monday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

Post about anything to do with the sea: ancestors who were sailors, shipwrights, fishermen, or coastguards including images, records and links.

Ernest William Espley is my wife’s 2nd cousin 1x removed. His parents are Ernest Wilson Little (aka Edward Espley) and Annie Edith Hutchings.

Ernest was born on 4 December 1904 in Salford, Lancashire.

In the 1911 census Ernest is with his mother and grandparents, Richard Booth Espley and Matilda Espley (nee Little) at 7 Lynton Avenue, Irlam, Lancashire.

Sometime in the September quarter of 1931 Ernest married Marjorie Halksworth and they had one daughter. Sadly Marjorie died early in 1934 at the young age of 27.

Ernest married again, in the September quarter of 1937, to Beatrice May Pye. They went on to have two children. Beatrice passed away in 2004 at the age of 97.

Ernest had a long career in the Merchant Navy eventually becoming a ship’s master.

On the 8th/9th December 1929 Ernest was third mate on the steam ship Manchester Regiment when they were involved in a rescue in mid-Atlantic. As a result of his gallantry Ernest was awarded the Lloyd’s silver medal.

Here is an article from the Dundee Courier of 31 December 1929.

Dundee Courier - 31 December 1929.png

MEDALS FOR SEA BRAVERY

The committee of Lloyds have advised the Imperial Merchant Service Guild that they have had under consideration the Guild’s report and others regarding the rescue of the crew of the steamer Volumnia by the steamer Manchester Regiment on 9th December.

The committee, as an acknowledgment of the gallant conduct and able seamanship displayed, have conferred Lloyd’s silver medal on  Captain Philip Linton, Manchester Regiment; Second Officer William Henry Downing; and Third Officer Ernest William Espley.

The bronze medal has been awarded to Boatswain Bromage and Able Seamen Stringer, Manins, Chidlow, and Kearns, also Mr Ziegler, a passenger.

You can find more information about the sea gallantry medal here – sea gallantry medal

Below is an extract from the above link about the rescue in December 1929.

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Rescue in Mid-Atlantic

On the 8th December 1929, the British ss Volumnia of Glasgow was in distress in very bad weather in the Atlantic Ocean; in response to distress signals the ss Manchester Regiment went to her assistance, and, having approached, waited for a lull in the storm before attempting a rescue. Shortly after 9 o’clock, despite the very dangerous sea running, the Master of the Manchester Regiment decided to attempt a rescue, and a boat was launched, in charge of the Second Mate, Mr Downing, with a crew consisting of Mr Espley, Third Mate, Bromage, Manin, Stringer, Kearns, Chidlow and Mr Ziegler. Very great difficulty was experienced in keeping the boat afloat, but by skilful manoeuvring Mr Downing, though badly injured in the hand in the launching of the boat, made two trips to the Volumnia and the entire forty-five members of the crew of that vessel were eventually taken off. The rescuing boat was badly damaged and abandoned (30.1.30)

In honour of the brave men and women of the Merchant Navy there is a poem called “Heroes” written by David Partridge – see it in full at BBC WW2 People’s War

These are the first two lines – very apt for this post.

Don’t speak to me of heroes until you’ve heard the tale                                                                  Of Britain’s merchant seamen who sailed through storm and gale                                              by David Partridge

 

Sunday’s Obituary – John Turner (1876-1926)

John Turner is my great grand uncle – he is the brother of my great grandmother Elizabeth Ann Musgrove (nee Turner). His parents are Thomas Turner (1848-1916) and Mary Jane Carradice (1854-1917) – my 2x great grandparents.

John was born in Kendal, Westmorland and his birth is registered in the March quarter of 1876. He was baptised on the 2 April 1876.

In the 1881 and 1891 census returns John is living with his parents and siblings in Settle, Yorkshire. In 1891 at the age of 14 his occupation is described as “hawker”.

John married Elizabeth Ann Gornall sometime in Q4 1900 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

In the 1901 census John and Elizabeth are living at 50 Taylor Street, Clitheroe with his older sister Elizabeth Ann and her husband Joseph Musgrove (my great grandparents). John is working as a general labourer.

Ten years later Johns still working as a general labourer and in the 1911 census John and Elizabeth are living at 13 Grimshaw Street, Clitheroe together with five children:-

Mary Ellen – born 1901
Catherine – born 1902
Annie – born 1905
Maria – born 1906
James – born 1907

They also had two other children who died as babies – John Thomas in 1903 and Elizabeth in 1909.

John and Elizabeth went on to have four more children:-

Winifred – born 1912
Ivy – born 1913
George Henry – born 1914
Florence – born 1915

As far as I can tell Elizabeth Ann died sometime in early 1919 at the age of 37 – her death is registered in Q1 in Clitheroe. I don’t know what happened to all the children at that time – some were still very young. I can only guess that they were cared for by relatives or even entered the workhouse.

I found the following newspaper article in the Lancashire Evening Post of 18 January 1926 detailing the circumstances of John’s death. It’s sometimes difficult to know that you have the right person in newspaper articles, especially with a fairly common name as John Turner. However the report says that he was living at 2 Marlborough Street, Clitheroe. This was the address of his parents in the 1911 census – so I am confident that I have the right person.

lancashire-evening-post-18-january-1926

THE ROADSIDE DEATH AT WORSTON

The body found in the snow on the roadside at Worston on Saturday, has been identified as that of John Turner, cattle drover, aged about 50, who had been living as 2, Marlborough Street, Clitheroe. He left that address about seven o’clock on Saturday and was found at nine o’clock, it being thought that the severe cold had caused his collapse. The facts of the case were reported to the coroner, who considers an inquest unnecessary.

Military Monday – Tom Musgrove (1898-1969)

Tom Musgrove is my 1st cousin 2x removed – he is my maternal grandfather’s cousin. Our common ancestors are my 2x great grandparents John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth. Tom was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire about 1898 to parents Joseph Musgrove and Bridget Maria Grainger. He was the fourth of at least ten children.

On 13 May 1916 Tom went to Blackburn and enlisted in the 4th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment. He was 18 years 9 months old. The medical report written at the time of his enlistment describes him as having ‘bow legs’.

Tom remained at ‘home’ until 28 February 1917. He embarked the following day from Southampton to Le Havre, France.

During the period May to June 1918 Tom appears to have been ‘surplus’ and transferred between Battalions. He was also granted 4 days leave to England in August.

The next significant piece of information from Tom’s service record on www.ancestry.co.uk is that he was admitted to hospital on 6 April 1919 – I can’t make out what the record says – see below. Anyway whatever it was he had an operation and was subsequently discharged after 62 days on 6 June 1919.

He was finally demobilized on 4 December 1919 to the Class Z Reserve.

Class Z Reserve was authorised by an Army Order of 3 December 1918. There were fears that Germany would not accept the terms of any peace treaty, and therefore the British Government decided it would be wise to be able to quickly recall trained men in the eventuality of the resumption of hostilities. Soldiers who were being demobilised, particularly those who had agreed to serve “for the duration”, were at first posted to Class Z. They returned to civilian life but with an obligation to return if called upon. The Z Reserve was abolished on 31 March 1920.

Tom married Rhoda Kear in Q4 1921. I haven’t been able to find a record of any children. He died sometime in Q3 1969 in Clitheroe.

Tombstone Tuesday – Thomas Musgrove (1920-1977)

This gravestone marks the resting place of my uncle Tommy.

I took the photograph on a recent visit to Clitheroe Cemetery in Lancashire.

Tommy is my mum’s brother and the son of Frederick Anisworth Stowell Musgrove and Florrie Musgrove. He was the second of eight children and the first boy, born on 2nd August 1920.

Sometime in the second quarter of 1942 Tommy married Winifred Agnes Taylor. The marriage was registered at Nelson in Lancashire. They had two children and five grandchildren

Tommy passed away on 20 May 1977.

Surname Saturday – Ainsworth

The Ainsworth’s in my family are on my maternal grandfather’s side.  The earliest person I have found so far is Thomas Ainsworth, my 4 x great grandfather.

According to the website surnamedb the name is of Anglo-Saxon origin.  It is said to be a locational name from a place called Ainsworth in Lancashire, which is recorded as “Hainewrthe”, around 1200 in the Pipe Rolls of Lancashire, and as “Aynesworth” in the Assize Court Rolls of 1285.

The placename is composed of the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name “Aegen” meaning own, plus “worth”, a homestead; hence “Aegen’s homestead”.

The surname is said to date back to the early 14th Century, and early recordings include John de Aynesworth, who appears in Baines “History of Lancashire” in 1370.  Church records list the christening of Richard Ainsworth on July 25th 1567 in Winwick, Lancashire.

One Robert Ainsworth (1660-1743) was educated at Botton, and published a much acclaimed treatise on education in 1698; he also compiled a Latin-English dictionary in 1736.

The first recorded spelling of the family name is said to be that of William de Aynesworth, which was dated 1332 in the “Lay Subsidy Rolls of Lancashire” during the reign of King Edward III.

My own Ainsworth’s come from Darwen in Lancashire exactly from the area where history suggests the name originates.

A  Google search of Ainsworth produces lots of family websites and genealogy information.  I have chosen to give you a link here to a website with information about the family name and further links to the Ainsworth Genealogy forum.

There will be more to come about my Ainsworth ancestors in the future.