Kendal

Black Sheep Sunday – Herbert John Croft (1898-1961)

Herbert John Croft is the husband of my 2nd cousin 2x removed, Agnes Ann Ainsworth.

Agnes was born on 23 September 1898 in Kendal, Westmorland. Her parents are Ralph Ainsworth and Margaret Ann Louisa Birkett. Our common ancestors are John Carradice and Ann Ridley – my 3x great grandparents.

Herbert was born on 7 June 1898, also in Kendal.

When WW1 broke out Herbert enlisted for service with the King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment on 28 July 1915. His regimental service number was 19829. His attestation papers show his age as 19 – in fact Herbert would not even be 17 for another two months.

However in just over 12 months Herbert was discharged as being “physically unfit” for service. He attended a medical board on 1 August 1916 and it is reported that around three years earlier he had been in hospital in connection with a heart problem and that since then he had “never had good health or felt perfectly well”. As a result he was finally discharged from military service on 15 August 1916.

About five years later Herbert married Agnes Ann Ainsworth – the marriage is registered in the second quarter of 1921 in Kendal.

Over the next 12 years Herbert seems to have had some “issues”. He appears in the Lancashire Evening Post at least three times (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

27 August 1921

Herbert John Croft - Lancashire Evening Post 27 August 1921.png

At Kendal, yesterday, Herbert John Croft, junr., was sentenced to one month’s imprisonment with hard labour for drawing out-of-work benefit whilst he was at work. He secured temporary employment to drive a motor ice-cream van, and whilst following that occupation went to the Kendal Labour Exchange and signed the register to the effect that he was out of work.

11 February 1933

Herbert John Croft - Lancashire Evening Post 11 February 1933

At Kendal, yesterday, Herbert John Croft, jun., motor engineer, a native of Kendal, of no fixed address, was remanded in custody until Monday on a charge of stealing an axe valued at 3s. 9d., the property of Messrs M. J. Croft and Son, Wildman Street, Kendal, the previous day.
The Chief Constable (Mr. P. O’Neill) objecting to bail, said there would probably be a more serious charge preferred against Croft.

I haven’t been able to find any other report relating to this offence.

10 June 1933

Herbert John Croft - Lancashire Evening Post - 10 Jun 1933.png

The story of a drunken man who threw a stone across the principal street in Kendal, striking the wall of a public house and narrowly missing women with babies in their arms, was told at Kendal yesterday, when Herbert John Croft, jun., aged 35 years, a Kendal engineer with no fixed address, was summoned for being drunk and disorderly at Highgate, Kendal, on Wednesday, June 7th. Defendant pleaded “Guilty.”
P.C. Marshall said he saw defendant throw the stone, and found two more in his pockets. When spoken to defendant said, “I know what I am doing.”
Defendant, who said he threw the stone at a man who had struck him, was fined £1.

The thing bothering me about the last two newspaper stories is the fact that Herbert is said to be of no fixed address. I’m left wondering what happened to his wife Agnes and their daughter Mavis Doreen who had been born in 1921.

In the 1939 Register (taken at the outbreak of WW2) Herbert is at 95 Windermere Road, Kendal. He is described as “married” and working as a “motor engineer”. In the same Register Agnes is with her parents at 30 Union Street, Kendal, together with her daughter Mavis.

So were Herbert and Agnes now living apart? Had they been separated since Herbert was described as of “no fixed address” six years earlier? Questions to which I am not going to get any answers now!

In some ways I feel sorry for Herbert. Perhaps being “physically unfit” had a serious impact on him. Or maybe he just made some wrong choices.

Sunday’s Obituary – Richard Varey (1866-1953)

Richard Varey is the husband of Margaret Stamper, my 1st cousin 3x removed.

Margaret was born in Kendal, Westmorland – her birth is registered in the March quarter of 1862. She was baptised on 4 May 1862. Her parents are William Stamper and Alice Rooking. Our common ancestors are Joseph Rooking and Mary Carradice – my 3x great grandparents. Sometime in the March quarter of 1899 Margaret married Richard in Kendal.

Richard had been born on 26 August 1866 at Holme, Westmorland.

After their marriage they lived at Holme. Richard worked as a limestone quarrymen for sometime but his main occupation was as a farm labourer.

In the 1939 Register (taken at the outbreak of WW2) Richard was a widower living at Duke Street, Holme, Westmorland. Margaret had passed away nine years earlier.

Richard died on 7 April 1953 and I recently found the following report in the Lancaster Guardian of Friday 24 April 1953 about the inquest held into his death (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Richard Varey - Lancaster Guardian 24 April 1953.png

HAD STROKE, FELL ON FIRE

Man 87 found by brother 81

Visiting his elder brother at Holme on Good Friday, white-haired 81-year-old Mr. Robert Varey of Clawthorpe, near Burton, found him dying with his head in the fireplace.
He told this at a Lancaster inquest on Friday on his brother, 87-year-old Richard Varey of Duke Street, Holme, who died in Lancaster Infirmary on Tuesday, April 7.
Mr. Varey said his brother was a retired farm worker. “I went round to his house at 1.45p.m.” he said. “I usually go twice a week. I went through into the kitchen where he had his meals and did his cooking.
HEAD AGAINST BOILER
“He was lying on the floor with his head against the boiler near the fireplace. The boiler does not hold water but it gets very hot and you can’t bide your hand near it.
“In front of the fire a chair was lying on its side and there was also a pan of porridge near the fire. I know it was my brother’s habit to sit on the chair by the fire while he made his porridge.
“It looked to me as if he had been doing that when he fell off the chair for some reason. He was still just alive when I got to him and he tried to speak but I could not make out the words. He was just about gone.”
Coroner Mr. G. F. E. Wilson recorded a verdict that death was due to a stroke and was hastened by burns to the scalp sustained in an accidental fall on a fire.

Sunday’s Obituary – Elizabeth Ann Whiting/Musgrove (1873-1946)

Elizabeth TurnerElizabeth Ann Turner is my great grandmother – she was born on 31 May 1873 in Kendal, Westmorland. Her parents are Thomas Turner and Mary Jane Carradice.

Libby Ann married Joseph Musgrove on 12 April 1893 at the Register Office in Settle, Yorkshire.

After Joseph died in 1933 Libby Ann married Albert James Whiting on 22 Jun 1935 at the Register Office in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

On the 29 November 1946 Libby Ann passed away and was buried in Clitheroe Cemetery four days later.

Details of her death were published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 6 December 1946.

Elizabeth Ann Whiting - CAT 6 Dec 1946

MRS ELIZABETH A WHITING

The death occurred last Friday of Mrs Elizabeth Ann Whiting, aged 73, wife of Mr James Whiting, of 13 Whalley Road, Clitheroe. Mrs Whiting was particularly well known throughout the country districts as far as Settle, but having been twice married, was better known as Mrs Musgrove. She had travelled the district with drapery. She leaves eight daughters and eight great-grand-children. The interment at St Mary’s Cemetery on Tuesday was conducted by the Rev H Y Burnett.

Sunday’s Obituary – Joseph Musgrove (1866-1933)

Joseph Musgrove is my great grandfather. He was born on 1 December 1866 in Kendal, Westmorland, to parents Harrison Musgrove and Jane Rooking.

Joseph was the youngest of eight children. He was baptised on 21 April 1867 in Kendal. Less than a year later his father (Harrison) died on 16 April 1868. Then when Joseph was six years old his mother (Jane) died on 12 April 1873.

I guess that Joseph would have been looked after by his older siblings after the death of their parents. And in the 1881 census he is boarding with his eldest sister Agnes and her husband David Hutchinson at Albert Hill in Settle, West Yorkshire.

By the time of the next census on 5 April 1891 Joseph was back in Westmorland working as an agricultural labourer and living on a farm in Duke Street, Holme – about 10 miles south of Kendal.

Just over two years later Joseph married Elizabeth Ann Turner on 12 April 1893 at Settle Register Office.

Not sure what it is about the month of April but all the previous significant events happened in that month!!!

Anyway, Joseph and Elizabeth journeyed south to Clitheroe in Lancashire – stopping off on their way for three or four years at Horton in Ribblesdale, West Yorkshire, where Joseph worked in the limestone quarry. Their first three children were born and baptised here.

At this time the family lived at Foredale Cottages – in the photograph below you can see the cottages on the hillside below the quarry.

myd36587_1.jpg

In the 1901 and 1911 census returns Joseph is still working as a limestone quarryman – now at the local Clitheroe quarry.

Over a period of about 20 years Joseph and Elizabeth had ten children:-

John Robert Turner Musgrove – born 2 November 1891
Thomas Musgrove – born cMarch 1894
Florrie Musgrove – born 6 January 1897
Mary Elizabeth Musgrove – born 22 August 1899
James Musgrove – born 9 April 1901
Joseph Musgrove – born cSeptember 1903
Leah Musgrove – born 28 July 1905
Isabel Musgrove – born 12 July 1906
Alice Musgrove – born 23 August 1910
Joseph Musgrove – born 23 October 1912

Sadly Joseph developed stomach cancer and he died at home on 30 September 1933. He was buried at Clitheroe Cemetery on 4 October 1933.

The archives for the Clitheroe Advertiser & Times have recently been added to the British Newspaper Archives website. I just discovered the following obituary.

Joseph Musgrove - Clitheroe Advertiser Sep 1933.png

A further death we have to record is that of Mr Joseph Musgrove, of 28 Russell Street. Mr Musgrove, who was sixty-six years of age, died on Sunday after a brief illness. Since the war Mr Musgrove had carried on business as a general dealer and was particularly well known among the farming community, his business bringing him into contact with farmers at the Clitheroe Auction Mart. A native of Kendal he had lived in Clitheroe for forty years, and for more than twenty years resided in Salford. At one period he was employed as a quarryman at Bold Venture Quarries. He leaves a widow, three sons and five daughters. The interment took place at St Mary’s Cemetery on Wednesday, the Rev S E Harper officiating.

Sunday’s Obituary – Edward Dixon (1910-1939)

Edward Dixon is my wife’s 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are William Rylatt Dixon and Sarah Ann Britliff. Their common ancestors are John Britliff and Sarah Rack, my wife’s 3x great grandparents. See previous posts about John Britliff here and here.

Edward was born on 18 May 1910 in Kendal, Westmorland.

At some point between 1910 and 1939 Edward, together with his parents and sister, moved from Kendal to Grantham in Lincolnshire. Edward’s father was employed as a “railway carter drayman” so perhaps he moved with his job.

I have no more information about Edward until the following report in the Grantham Journal on 15 December 1939 about his death.

Grantham Journal 15 Dec 1939.png

RAILWAY GUARD AT HELLIFIELD

Young Grantham Man’s Death

After an illness lasting some six months the death occurred last week of Mr Edward Dixon, son of Mr and Mrs W R Dixon, of 29 Swinegate, Grantham, at the comparatively young age of 29 years.

Deceased was employed as a guard on the LMS Railway at Hellifield, Yorks.

The funeral took place on Monday, a service at the parish church, conducted by the Vicar, Canon C H Leake, preceding the interment in the cemetery, where the last rites were conducted by the Rev C L G Hutchings.

The mourners were:- Father and mother; Miss A Dixon, sister; Miss Shepherd, fiancee; Mr and Mrs s Dixon, Sibsey, Miss Maplethorpe, Lincoln, cousins; Mr J Shepherd, Burnley; and Mr L Huff, representing the LMS Railway at Hellifield.

The floral tributes were sent by father, mother and sister; aunt and cousins at Sibsey; uncle and cousin at Lincoln; Elenor; Mr and Mrs Shepherd, Burnley; Mr and Mrs Felstead; Mr and Mrs Rowland; Mr and Mrs Woods; Mr and Mrs Harrison, Signal Road; Mr and Mrs Bibby, Eliza and Ethel, Skipton; Miss Staniland, and Mrs Golding; fellow members of the LMS Railway at Hellifield; Mr and Mrs Morris; Mr and Mrs Woolmer and family; Mr and Mrs R W Savage; Phyllis; M A and A E Wilson and Miss Odom; Mrs C G Hardy; Mr and Mrs Thomas and Mr and Mrs Williams; Mrs Walters; Mr and Mrs W W Winn; Mrs Raines and family; Miss M E Barkes; Mr and Mrs Dixon, Kirkby Stephen.

Madness Monday – Robert Ainsworth (1880-1959)

Madness Monday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Madness Monday simply create a post with the main focus being an ancestor who either suffered some form of mental illness or an ancestor who might be hard to locate and drives you mad.

Robert Ainsworth is my 1st cousin 3x removed. He was born in Kendal, Westmorland, on 7 June 1880 to parents Thomas Ainsworth and Ann Carradice. Our common ancestors are John Carradice and Ann Ridley, my 3x great grandparents.

I have Robert in the 1881, 1891, 1901 and 1911 census returns and also the 1939 Register.

In 1891 he was a scholar
In 1901 he was a labourer in a woollen mill
In 1911 he was in prison.

I decided to have a look to see if I could find anything about why Robert ended up in prison at the time of the 1911 census.

There was nothing in the newspaper archives on Find My Past – so presumably nothing of a serious nature then?

How about the crime and punishment registers? – I found 14 entries for Robert over a seven year period.

Date

Offence

Punishment

Date of Discharge

9 May 1904

Disorderly Conduct

14 Days

21 May 1904

22 November 1904

Refusal of Task in Workhouse

7 Days

28 November 1904

23 December 1904

Misbehaviour in Workhouse

14 Days

5 January 1905

15 May 1905

Disorderly

14 Days

27 May 1905

13 June 1905

Obscene Language

14 Days

26 June 1905

10 August 1908

Obscene Language

14 Days

23 August 1908

16 September 1908

Obscene Language

14 Days

30 September 1908

7 June 1909

BBL (?)

14 Days

20 Jun 1909

3 July 1909

Assault PC

2 Months

2 September 1909

25 April 1910

Abusive Language

14 Days

8 May 1910

18 June 1910

Assault PC

4 Months

17 October 1910

29 October 1910

Obscene Language

14 Days

11 November 1910

15 November 1910

Begging

14 Days

28 November 1910

7 March 1911

Assault PC / Obscene Language            

4 Months / 14 Days                          

6 July 1911

So at the time of the census on 2 April 1911 Robert had been in prison for almost four weeks for assaulting a Police Constable and using obscene language.

Clearly Robert was a habitual offender for at least these seven years. So I hear you ask at this point – why is this post not in the Black Sheep Sunday category? Well please read on for the answer!!

Below is the 1911 entry from the Crime & Punishment Registers. You will see the note in the end column – Certified insane on 6th May 1911 and removed to Carlisle Asylum 10th May 1911.

Crime & Punishment Register 1911.png

It took at least seven years of regular offending and prison sentences before Robert was certified as being ill.

At the moment I do not know how long Robert spent in the Carlisle Asylum. However he was certainly there at the time of the 1939 Register, which was completed on 29 September that year. He is shown as a patient and has an occupation as a general labourer.

There is a death record for Robert Ainsworth in the September quarter of 1959 registered in the Border District of Northumberland – I am confident that this is my Robert.

Black Sheep Sunday – Eleanor Hopkinson (Part 2)

I’m sure you’ve all been waiting with baited breath to find out what happened to Eleanor Hopkinson and George Carradice since last week’s revelations.

Below is the newspaper account of the trial as reported in the Kendal Mercury on 21 October 1865.

Kendal MercuryWESTMORLAND QUARTER SESSIONS

STEALING £10 FROM THE PERSON – MOON’S CASE

Eleanor Hopkinson and George Carradice were charged with stealing £10 from the person of John Moon, on the 1st October. Both were also indicted for receiving the money. They were also charged on another count with stealing a silver watch from the person of Leonard Metcalfe on the 1st of October. Prisoners pleaded Not Guilty.

Mr Mc”Oubrey addressed the jury for the prosecution, said: Mr Moon was a basket maker in Kendal, at the time of the robbery. He received £60 in 12 £5 notes from Mr C G Thomson, as a legacy. On receiving this money, perhaps he was not so careful of his conduct as he might have been. At any rate he was in the house about 12 o’clock. He had at this time five £5 notes, and had occasion to go to the privy. On his way there he had to pass the house where the two prisoners lived. While there the female prisoner came and used him very indecently. He made his way out as soon as possible, and on getting up on Sunday morning he found the five notes were gone. He gave notice of the robbery immediately to Serge. Hogarth. When, on Sunday evening Eleanor Hopkinson was in the Black Bull, she asked for change for a £5 note. Now, this note note was one of the very numbers which Mr Moon gave to the police, 257E. A boy named Mark went for change to Mr Break’s. Breaks went up stairs to get change, and, very properly took it himself over to Mrs Thompson. This note was afterwards given to Mr Hibberd. Mr Hibberd on this went to the house and apprehended the prisoner Hopkinson, and he afterwards found the other note, number 90G in a heap of ashes, a very unlikely place to find notes honestly come by.

He then called John Moon, who was sworn and said; I live in yard No. 109, Highgate; I am a basket maker. The prisoners Carradice and Hopkinson live in the same yard. I remember last Sunday morning; early on that morning, I had occasion to go to the privy – it was then about twenty minutes past twelve; to get to the closet I had to pass the prisoners’ house. The female prisoner came to me whilst I was in the closet; she used me very roughly; I had had some drink in the evening, I knew what I was doing. I left her in the privy, I was not more than three or four minutes in the place. When I went to the privy I had five five pound notes in my pocket. They were five notes issued by the Kendal Bank. I first missed the notes about seven o’clock on the same morning. I gave the number of two of the notes at the Bank, on Monday morning. It was directly the Bank opened. (The notes were here handed to the witness for identification.) I can identify these as two of the notes. I have not seen the notes since Saturday up to this minute. The numbers of the notes are 90G and 257E. I speak from memory. They are two of the notes I lost on Sunday morning.

Cross-examined: I received the money on Friday night about six o’clock.

Did you drink at all that night? – I had a glass or two.

Did you drink on Saturday? – Oh, yes, I had a good sup.

Well, were you so drunk that you did know what you were doing? – No, I was fresh but I knew what I was about.

Were you “fresh” at six o’clock? – Yes

And I suppose you got “fresher” afterwards? – I was better afterwards.

What! did you get better the more you drank? – Yes.

How much drink did you have on Saturday? – Oh, I can’t say.

Did you have twenty glasses? – I don’t think i did, I might have had a dozen.
A dozen glasses of what? – Oh, ale.

Did you have no spirits? – I had a glass of rum in the morning.

As “freshener” I suppose. Did you have anything else in the day, except ale? – No. I was last in the White Hart, I had a glass or two of ale there. I have a wife, it was not my wife I met. I met the woman at the Exchange, she did not get any £5 notes from me – we took a walk down Miller-field, to Miller-bridge. That was between eight and nine o’clock. I am certain she had nothing to do with the loss of the notes. I gave her a glass or two. I had the notes in my inside waistcoat pocket. I knew well I was doing when I got home. I gave several people a glass of ale, they knew that I had the money. When I was in the privy the woman came in to me – I was not there two minutes. I got out as soon as I could. I felt her “rummaging” about my breast. I did not examine my pockets when I got in the house. I felt that the notes were there about twelve o’clock. It was about twenty minutes past twelve when I was in the privy. The numbers of the two notes were 257E and 90G. I know the numbers of several more.

Name them. – I have an objection to doing so.

Being ordered by the Bench to do so he gave numbers of two more of the notes.

Examination resumed: I had the numbers in my memory. I am a basket maker.

I am the son of William Mark, who was an innkeeper. My mother keeps the Black Bull, in Kirkland. I live with her. I remember Sunday last. The female prisoner was in our house on that day. About nine at night she asked mother if she could change the note. Mother could not. The prisoner offered to give me a penny if I would change it. She had some other notes in a piece of white calico, they were folded up. She took one out to give to me to change. I went to several places. I went Richard Breaks, who took the note and went across with me to our house with the change.

Cross-examined: It was about half-past nine. She used to come to the house to clean.

Richard Breaks was then sworn – I am a grocer, living in Kirkland. I remember the last witness coming to my house; it was a little past nine on Sunday night. he asked if I could change his mother a five-pound note. I asked what kind of note it was. He said, “ A Kendal note”. He handed the note to me. I took it upstairs and changed it. I left the note upstairs, and took the change to the Black Bull. I found the landlady and a good many women there. I asked who wanted change: none of the women would take to the note or the change. I called the landlady into the kitchen. She said it belonged to Eleanor Musgrove (the female prisoner goes by this name), but that she the landlady would have nothing to do with it. I gave the note back to Mrs Thompson.

Margaret Thompson, was sworn, and said: My husband kept the Black Bull. On the 1st of October the prisoner came in on the Sunday evening and asked for change. She sent the boy for it. Mr Breaks afterwards came across with the money. She was in the lobby waiting, when se asked me for the money. I told her I would give it to the right owner. I fetched the note from Mr Breaks and gave it to Mr Hibberd.

Edward Hibberd said: I am superintendent of police. On Monday morning last, a little after ten o’clock, I received this note I now produce, No 257E, from the last witness, Mrs Thompson. Shortly afterwards I apprehended the prisoner, Eleanor Hopkinson, at her house in a yard in Highgate. I charged her with stealing five five-pound notes from John Moon, whilst in a privy together late on Saturday night, or early on Sunday morning. She took from some part of her dress these two keys (produced in court), which she gave to a woman named Mary Barber. I took the keys from her. She said that one belonged to a tea caddy, an the other to the lower room or coal cellar. I locked the prisoner up. The house door was locked. I returned to the house soon after, and partially searched the house. The room where the prisoners lived was locked. I locked the door again when I left. When I returned again to the room I found the lock broken off and the door standing open. The prisoner Carradice was sitting on the floor at the far end of the room. he was the worse for liquor. I searched the room and found beneath some ashes and rubbish about eighteen inches from where the prisoner was sitting a piece of rag and a five pound note, No 90G. I took Carradice into custody and brought him to the office. I charged him with being concerned in the robbery of notes from Mr Moon on Sunday morning.

This was the case for the prosecution. Mr Fawcett then addressed the jury for the defence. He said he appeared only on behalf of the female prisoner. he not disguise from himself or from the jury that it was a very serious charge, and at first glance it did seem as if the prisoner were guilty. He then explained the law on felony, and said that unless he could persuade them that the woman could satisfactorily account for the amount of money it would go very hard against them. he must say there was something very curious about the manner in which the money was lost. Did the jury really think the woman was the one who took the notes? and, although he did not appear on the part of the man he could not see any fact against him. He then sifted the whole evidence, and left the case with the jury.

The jury retired, and on re-entering gave in a verdict of “guilt against the woman”, but found the man innocent. The woman was sentenced to seven years’ penal servitude.

WATCH STEALING

The prisoners were then further charged with stealing a watch, the property of Leonard Metcalfe, on the 1st of October.

Mr Mounsey appeared for the prosecution, and called Leonard Metcalfe, who said: He is a driver at the Commercial Hotel, and started about eleven o’clock on the night of Saturday, the 30th of September, to take a party to Holme. he started from that place about two o’clock on Sunday morning. Falling asleep several times, he was at length aroused by two men unknown to him shouting “Len”. On looking up to see what time it was, he found his watch was gone.

Superintendent Hibberd deposed to findning the watch, with the bank-notes, in the prisoner Carradice’s room.

The jury acquitted both prisoners.

Interestingly, despite giving quite a full account of the trial the Kendal Mercury did not include Eleanor’s reaction to being found guilty and to her sentence. Unlike the Westmorland Gazette and the Carlisle Journal which both reported – The prisoner screamed out vile malediction against the Chairman, and was removed from the dock cursing.

So what is “penal servitude”? It really just means a term of imprisonment that usually included hard labour.

Eleanor spent about ten months in prison at Kendal and was then transferred to Brixton Prison in July 1866.

Below you can see the:-

  • Criminal Register for Kendal for 20 October 1865 showing Eleanor Hopkinson and George Carradice
  • Record showing that Eleanor was transferred to Brixton Prison on 27 July 1866.

Kendal Criminal Register

Brixton Prison

Clearly Eleanor did not complete seven years locked up because as I said in Part 1 of this story last week she appears in the 1871 census living with George Carradice in Kendal.

Kendal 1871 Census