Keighley

Black Sheep Sunday – Amos Clarkson

Amos Clarkson is the husband of my 5th cousin, Phyllis Wilson.

Phyllis was born on 23 March 1911 at Keighley, West Yorkshire. Her parents are Herbert Morris Wilson and Gerty Smith. Our common ancestors are Patrick Tattersall and Mary Gordon – my 4x great grandparents.

Amos was born on 23 March 1908 in Silsden, West Yorkshire.

On 22 April 1933 Amos and Phyllis married at the Parish Church in Silsden. At the time of their marriage Amos was a Police Constable and living at Taylor Street, Batley, West Yorkshire.

Unfortunately Amos found himself in trouble and in prison in 1947. The story was covered in the Daily Mirror on Friday 28 February 1947 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Amos Clarkson - Daily Mirror 28 February 1947.png

11-inch footprint clue puts P.C. in gaol for 3 years

A Policeman with footprints eleven inches long and a stride of twenty-eight inches, is to serve three years’ penal servitude.
He is Police-Constable Amos Clarkson, 38, of the West Riding Constabulary, who lives at Halifax Road, Hightown, Liversedge, Yorks, and sentence was passed on him at Leeds yesterday.
Footprints with diamond hallmarks, found inside the shop from which £25 10s. was stolen, coincided with Clarkson’s, it was stated.
Thirteen days after a robbery in a baker’s shop, police hid in it and were there when Clarkson entered. He ran away when taken in custody.

“I Lost My Head”
Clarkson told the Judge he was not near the shop on the night of the theft. “I lost my head.” he said, when asked why he ran away.
Passing sentence, the Judge said he was painfully conscious of the disaster the verdict meant to Clarkson and his wife and family, but it was impossible for him to take a lenient view.
Clarkson’s wife was carried screaming from the court.

Sunday’s Obituary – Hartley Greenwood (1878-1932)

Hartley Greenwood is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Town Greenwood and Sarah Buckley. Our common ancestors are Thomas Buckley and Henrietta Mason (my 3x great grandparents).

Hartley was born in Keighley, West Yorkshire sometime in the June quarter of 1878.

On Christmas Eve 1902 Hartley married Rosetta Green at St. Peter’s church, Keighley. One of the witnesses was Hartley’s sister, Mary Alice.

I haven’t been able to find Hartley and Rosetta on the 1911 census.

So the next time I come across them is a newspaper report in the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer of Saturday 21 May 1932. This is a report of an inquest (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Hartley Greenwood - Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer 21 May 1932.png

FATAL BLOOD CLOT

Keighley Man’s Bus Journey with Broken Leg

At the adjourned inquest yesterday on Hartley Greenwood (53), textile fitter, of Aspley Street, Keighley, who died in hospital on March 30, P.C. Heaton, of the Bradford City Police, stated that on March 23 he saw Greenwood sitting on the causeway. Greenwood said he had been accidentally kicked by another man while boarding a tramcar, and could not stand. Witness took him to the Bradford Royal Infirmary, and, after he had received treatment, put him on a bus for Keighley. Greenwood, added witness, said he would be all right if he were put on the bus. There was no mention of Greenwood’s leg being broke.
The widow, Rosetta Greenwood, said in her opinion her husband should have been brought by ambulance from Bradford, adding: “I don’t think it is right to send a man out like that with a broken leg. He looked terrible when brought home from the bus stand.”
Dr. J. Prentice said he saw Greenwood, at his home, the same night. He was satisfied that Greenwood’s left leg was broken, and the next day ordered his removal to the Keighley hospital. If there was a great deal of swelling it was very difficult to tell if a bone was broken. In his opinion, however, the movement from Bradford would not cause the blood clot, which was set up by the fracture, and which was the cause of death.
A verdict in accordance with medical evidence was returned, the jury adding a rider that in their opinion Greenwood should have been sent home from Bradford in the ambulance, and should not have been allowed to travel by bus.

Hartley was buried on 2 April 1932 at St. John’s church, Ingrow with Hainworth, Keighley.

In the 1939 Register (taken at the outbreak of WW2) Rosetta is living with Hartley’s sister, Selina Elizabeth, at Prospect Place, Keighley.

About two years later Rosetta married Henry Hensman sometime in the September quarter of 1941. Henry was recently widowed and was about nine years older than Rosetta.

They were married for about 22 years before Henry died on 10 February 1963. Rosetta lived for another five years, passing away on 10 June 1968.

Military Monday – Joseph Thomas Greenwood (1906-1945)

Joseph Thomas Greenwood is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Watson Greenwood and Margaret Alice Gawthrop. Our common ancestors are John Gawthrop and Sarah Brown (my 4x great grandparents).

Joseph was born on 28 March 1906 in Keighley, West Yorkshire. He was the third of five sons for Watson and Margaret. The others were:-

John Willie – 5 April 1898
Sydney – 26 May 1901
Ernest Pickles – 1 August 1907
Fred – 12 February 1909

At some point, I believe in the early 1930’s Watson and Margaret moved to Kent together with some of the boys. In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2 Watson is listed as a “poultry farmer”. The only son still at home was Fred – he was a soldier, home on leave.

Joseph married Dorothy Edna Clarke sometime in the June quarter of 1935. In the 1939 Register Joseph is listed as a “milk roundsman”.

I recently discovered that Joseph was a Corporal with Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. His service number was 1274826. I don’t have any other information about his war service.

While trying to fill in some gaps in my family history tree I cam across the following brief newspaper story from the Nottingham Journal of Thursday 8 November 1945 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Joseph Thomas Greenwood - Nottingham Journal 8 Nov 1945.png

On his first day back at work after demobilisation from the R.A.F., Joseph Thomas Greenwood (39), married, of Ashford, Kent, collapsed at the wheel of his bus on Wednesday and died within a few moments.

Joseph has an entry on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWG) website. This tells me that he is buried at Charing (Kent County) Crematorium and commemorated on the WW2 memorial there.

In 1950 Dorothy married Leslie John Ronald Potticary in Aldershot, Hampshire.

Military Monday – William Herbert Jowett (1891-1972)

William Herbert Jowett is the husband of my grand aunt, Sarah Ellen Dawson. In other words brother-in-law of my grandfather, Joseph Dawson.

William, or Willie as he was known in the family, was born on 16 March 1891. He was baptised at St. James church, Silsden, West Yorkshire on 12 April 1891.

In the 1911 census Willie was living at College Street, Keighley, West Yorkshire, with his parents Christopher and Emma, three brothers and one sister. He was working as a “fitter’ in the machine tools workshop of Dean, Smith & Grace, manufacturers of lathes and milling machines in Keighley.

On the 17 March 1914 Willie enlisted in the army for 4 years in the Territorial Force with the West Riding Regiment – his service number was 2093.

Two years later under the terms of the Military Service Act 1916 Willie had his period of service extended to 17 March 1919.

He was subsequently assigned as a Corporal to the Royal Flying Corps. (RFC) on 5 October 1917, with a new service number of 405053. When the Royal Air Force was formed on 1 April 1918 Willie was transferred to the RAF as a Corporal Mechanic.

Willie served in France from 20 November 1917 to 4 March 1919 – when he was transferred to the RAF Reserve.

Willie and Sarah Ellen married in Keighley on 1 May 1923. They didn’t have any children.

I remember as youngster in the late 1950’s and 1960’s going with my parents numerous times to visit Wille and Sarah Ellen at their home in Keighley.

They both died in 1972.

Sunday’s Obituary – William Henry Watkinson (1860-1932)

William Henry Watkinson is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. His parents are Thomas Watkinson and Harriet Mason. Our common ancestors are Anthony Mason and Mary Brayshaw – my 4x great grandparents.

William was born in Keighley, West Yorkshire – his birth is registered in the June quarter of 1860.

On 5 June 1889 William married Emma Crabtree at the Baxter Congregational Church, Kidderminster, Worcestershire. They had four children:-

Gwendolen – 1890
Arthur Stanley – 4 August 1891
Hilda Muriel – 17 May 1895
Geoffrey Lionel – 20 July 1899

William was an extremely successful and distinguished university professor of engineering. He died on 14 February 1932 and an obituary was published in the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer on Tuesday 16 February 1932 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Henry Watkinson - Yorkshire Post & Leeds Intelligencer 16 February 1932.png

Distinguished Northern Engineer

Professor William Henry Watkinson, a past-president of the Liverpool Engineering Society, has died at his residence in Bromborough, Cheshire, at the age of 71.
Professor Watkinson was a native of Keighley and had only an elementary school education. He worked as a half-timer in a mill and later served his apprenticeship to the practical side of engineering in a workshop in the town. Evening classes at the Keighley Institute provided the foundation of his scientific training. Following a period during which he worked in Bradford, he entered Glasgow University in 1882, becoming one of the assistants of Sir William Thomson, afterwards Lord Kelvin.
As assistant to Sir William Thomson and Professor Fleming Jenkin, he played a part in superintending the manufacture and laying of two Transatlantic cables.
He was at Glasgow University for five years, holding the Thomson Research Scholarship from 1885 to 1888 and the Whitworth Scholarship in 1886. Later he was Lecturer in Engineering at Sheffield and Professor of Engineering at Glasgow and the West of Scotland Technical College. He was Professor of Engineering at Liverpool University for 20 years, and was the inventor of superheaters and internal combustion engines.
Among his publications were papers read to the Institution of Naval Architects and other institutions.

Further reading about William is available on Grace’s Guide to British Industrial History – here.

Black Sheep Sunday – Charles Cantwell & Edna May Cantwell (nee Buckley)

Edna May Buckley is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Ramsden Buckley and Emma Elliott. Our common ancestors are Thomas Buckley and Henrietta Mason – my 3x great grandparents.

Edna May was born in Keighley, West Yorkshire on 7 November 1904. She was the last of six children. In the 1911 census the family were living at 16 Hainworth Lane, Keighley.

Sometime in the second quarter of 1923 Edna May married Charles Cantwell. Charles was born on 8 August 1903 and was also from Keighley.

Before they were married Charles had been in trouble with the police more than once.

In 1918 he appeared in court along with four other young men. They were charged with stealing a cap and a pack of cards, valued at 3s 6d, from the Keighley Bowling Club on 13 December. All five pleaded guilty and Charles was fined ten shillings.

Less than three years into their marriage things were not going well. The following report is from the Leeds Mercury of 27 February 1926.

Charles Cantwell - Leeds Mercury 27 February 1926.png

KEIGHLEY: Red Hot Poker Attack

Alleged to have thrown hot tea over his wife, struck her with a red hot poker, blackened her eyes, and threatened her with a razor, Charles Cantwell, labourer, of Bogthorne, Oakworth, at Keighley yesterday was ordered to pay 20s a week on a separation order.

At the time of the 1939 Register in September that year Charles and Edna May are still together and living at 56 Woodhouse Grove, Keighley. Charles is working as a “scrap iron dealer”

Four and a half months later both Charles and Edna May appear in the Yorkshire Evening Post of 13 February 1940.

Charles Cantwell - YEP 13 February 1940.png

CHASE & FIGHT IN THE BLACKOUT

KEIGHLEY CONSTABLE COMMENDED

Gaol for Man who Stole from Cafe

Charles Cantwell (34), general dealer, Woodhouse Grove, Keighley, was sent to prison for a total of six months when he was charged at Keighley today with stealing knives and forks from Ramsden’s Cafe, and with assaulting Police constable Lodge in the execution of his duty.
His wife, Edna M Cantwell, who was also charged with the theft, was fined £1 in this case, and a further £1 on a charge of obstructing the police.
Richard A Robinson (28), hairdresser, Linnet Street, Keighley, was jointly charged with the theft, but the case against him was dismissed.
Defendants pleaded not guilty.
The Mayor asked that the work of Police constable Lodge in the case be brought to the notice of the proper authority.
Superintendent Atkinson said that about10.30pm on February 1 the defendants went to the cafe and had supper. When they left, a waitress missed three knives and forks, a sugar basin, and a bottle of tomato ketchup from the table. Police constable Lodge saw defendants leave the cafe. Hearing something rattling in Charles Cantwell’s pocket the officer asked him what he had there. Cantwell ran down High Street towards the cross.
Giving chase the officer caught Cantwell in Church Street, where, it was alleged, Cantwell took a bottle of ketchup from his raincoat pocket, struck the constable on the left arm with it, and then threw it away. There was a struggle and both fell. When they got up Cantwell took something else from his pocket and threw it away and the constable heard the sound of breaking crockery. Cantwell then struck and kicked the constable, causing him to lose his hold.
Again Cantwell bolted and again the constable caught him, this time in Low Street. There was another struggle and Mrs Cantwell pulled the constable’s cape over his head and tried to free her husband.
Eventually the constable managed to blow his whistle and it was not until then that Cantwell gave up struggling. The wife, it is alleged, was obstructing the constable all the way. Later a broken sugar basin, Cantwell’s hat, a fork, and a bottle of tomato ketchup were found in the street.
Police constable Lodge said Cantwell had some drink, but he was not drunk.
Answering Mr H Wall (Turner and Wall, Keighley), witness said it was possible that Cantwell might have got rid of the other forks during the chase.

Somebody’s “Joke”

Charles Cantwell told the bench that he was drunk at the time of the alleged offence. He put his raincoat over a chair in the cafe, but he put nothing into the pockets. He suggested that someone might have put the things in his pocket as a joke.
“As far as assaulting the officer goes, it was him that assaulted me,” added defendant.
Robinson said he had no knowledge of anything having been taken. He did not take anything.
Mrs Cantwell had nothing to say.

That is the last newspaper article I have been able to find about either Charles or Edna May. Perhaps six months in prison was the turning point and they had a trouble free existence after that.

Charles died on 22 January 1980 and left a will valued at £9641.

Edna May died on 1 May 1980 and she left a will valued at £15155.

Military Monday – Flather Heap (1897-1962)

Flather Heap is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. His parents are John Starkie Heap and Martha Elizabeth Forrest. Our common ancestors are Anthony Mason and Mary Brayshaw, my 4x great grandparents.

Flather was born on 1 May 1897 in Keighley, West Yorkshire. He was the youngest of four children.

When the First World War came Flather enlisted for service on 13 November 1915 – he was immediately assigned to the army reserve with a service number of 141238.

He waited a further six moths before being mobilised on 11 May 1916 as a Gunner with the Royal Field Artillery. He was posted to No.1 Depot in Newcastle upon Tyne for training and as part of a home based defence unit.

Eventually on 3 January 1917 Flather was posted to France as part of the Expeditionary Force.

On 31 July 1917 Flather was appointed as Acting Bombadier (equivalent to the rank of Corporal) with the 177th Brigade. The promotion was made substantive on 11 November 1917.

On the 8 August 1917 he was wounded in action but I have no other information as to the extent of his injuries. I can also see from his record that he was hospitalised in May 1918 after being “gassed”.

Flather survived the war and was finally demobilised on 8 February 1919.

He returned home to Keighley where he married Clara Bancroft on 28 May 1922.

In the 1939 Register Flather and Clara are living at 2 Morning Street, Keighley. He is working as a “weaving overlooker”.

Clara passed away in 1958 and Flather lived for a further four years before passing toward the end of 1962.