John Stowell

Sunday’s Obituary – Alfred Chadwick (1871-1874)

Alfred Chadwick is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. His parents are Benjamin Towler Chadwick and Susannah Jane Lister. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff (my 4x great grandparents).

Alfred’s mother, Susannah, is my 1st cousin 4x removed. She was born in Burnley, Lancashire sometime in the March quarter of 1849 to parents Richard Lister and Jane Stowell.

In the 1861 census Susannah and her sister Mary Ellen were pupils at the Servants School in Casterton, near Kendal, Westmorland. Perhaps being trained for a life in service. That sort of life didn’t happen for Susannah, but I’m not sure the alternative was much better for her.

On 11 October 1868 Susannah married Benjamin Towler Chadwick at St James church, Burnley. As far as I can tell they had six children – but sadly four of them died in infancy, including Alfred.

The following article is from the Burnley Gazette of 2 January 1875 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Alfred Chadwick - Burnley Gazette 2 Jan 1875.png

A CHILD BURNED TO DEATH – An inquest was held at the Borough Hotel, Burnley, on Saturday morning, before Mr. H. U. Hargreaves, coroner, on the body of Alfred Chadwick, a boy aged 31/2 years, who died on Friday last from the effects of burns which he received on Wednesday the 23rd instant. — Susannah Jane Chadwick, wife of Benjamin Chadwick, of Piccadilly Road, said her husband was a lawyer’s clerk. The deceased was her son, and was burnt on Wednesday, the 23rd instant., about ten minutes to two o’clock. Witness had left the boy in the back kitchen, where she had lighted a fire for the use of a washerwoman, and had not been out of the place above a minute when she heard a scream; and on going to see what it was she found the boy lying on his face and his pinafore on fire. She had previously placed some clothes on a clothes “horse” in front of the fire, but they were not touched by the fire, and the boy had crept underneath. She wrapped a sheet around him immediately and put the fire out. The boy told her that his brother, who was in the kitchen with him, had given him a stick, and that he had gone underneath the “winter-hedge” and put it into the fire. The brother, who was a little older, told his mother that he did not notice the deceased to be on fire until he screamed, and then he called out to his mother. The elder brother denied having given deceased a stick. The deceased was burnt on the face, left arm, and knees, and his death occurred on Friday morning between seven and eight o’clock. — Dr. Smithwaite attended the deceased. —The jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was accidentally burned to death.

This must surely have been a terrible time for the whole family.

Susannah then died at the relatively young age of 41 on 23 May 1890 and I do wonder whether she ever got over the tragic death of Alfred.

Sunday’s Obituary – Margaret Stowell (1864-1868)

Margaret Stowell is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. her parents are Thomas Stowell and Ann Wroe. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff – my 4x great grandparents.

Margaret was born sometime in the first quarter of 1864 in Burnley, Lancashire. She was the first of at least ten children. Margaret was baptised on 25 March 1864 at St. Paul’s church in Burnley.

Very sadly Margaret only had a short life.

The Burnley Gazette of Saturday 15 August 1868 carried the following story.

Margaret Stowell - Burnley Gazette 15 august 1868.png

SHOCKING ACCIDENT – On Monday a little girl four years of age, named Margaret Stowell, and who resided at Lanshaw Bridge, came to a sad end by being run over with a cart, the wheel passing over her head, and killing her instantaneously. The inquest was held on Wednesday at the Emmett Arms before H U Hargreaves, Esq., coroner, when the jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”

Black Sheep Sunday – James Bowes (1888-1973)

James Bowes is my 3rd cousin 2x removed.

James was born on 27 December 1888 in Burnley, Lancashire, to parents James Bowes and Ada Welsh. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

James married Gerty Roberts sometime in the March quarter of 1915.

In 1939, at the outbreak of World War Two James and Gerty were living at Clifton Street, Nelson, Lancashire.

It is common practice during wartime for a blackout to be introduced. People who failed to keep their homes or premises in darkness were liable to stringent legal penalties.

On 6 June 1941 the Nelson Leader carried a report that James was in breach of the lighting regulations.

James Bowes - Nelson Leader 6 June 1941.png

Black-Out Offence

For a breach of the lighting regulations, James Bowes (52), 18 Clifton Street, Nelson, was fined 10s, by the local magistrates on Saturday. P.W.R. Jolly said he was in Chapel Street at 11.50pm on Saturday, May 17th, when he saw a bright beam of light shining from the back kitchen window of defendant’s home. He found that the window was screened only by light brown curtains, and these were about three inches apart down the centre. Defendant said it was an oversight, he had blacked-out the front of the house, and forgotten to draw the dark blind in the kitchen.

Wedding Wednesday – John Park and Helen Stowell

Helen Stowell is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are Dent Stowell and Helen Gordon. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

Helen was born on 21 July 1921 in Wayne, Michigan, USA. She came to England with her family in 1933.

Before joining the W.R.E.N.’s in 1940 Helen worked at Marks and Spencer’s branch in Wolverhampton.

While serving in the W.R.EN.’s in Scotland Helen met and married John Park. A report of their marriage is in the Burnley Express of 29 November 1941.

Helen Stowell & John Park wedding.png

Naval Wedding

A guard-of-honour of Wrens and naval ratings was formed at Bon Accord Church of Scotland, Aberdeen, for the wedding of Mr John Park (R.N.), son of Mr and Mrs Park, 78 East Crescent, Troon, Ayrshire, to Miss Helen Stowell (W.R.N.S.), daughter of Mr and Mrs D Stowell, 40 Accrington Road, Burnley.

Given away by her friend, Mr A Bengie, of Aberdeen, the bride was charmingly attired in white stiff lace with satin edgings and a veil with a headdress of orange blossom. She carried a bouquet of pink and white chrysanthemums. The bridesmaid, Miss Adeline Downie, who is also serving with the W.R.N.S., wore a white lace with cyclamen edgings and a shepherdess hat of white net. The mixed flowers of her posy toned with those on her dress and hat.

The groom’s friend, Mr Felix Clark (R.N.), was best man.

After a reception at the bridesmaid’s home Mr and Mrs Park left to spend their honeymoon in Wolverhampton, the bride travelling in uniform.

Sunday’s Obituary – Ada Bowes (nee Welsh) 1867-1950

Ada Welsh is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. Her parents were Patrick Welsh (or sometimes Walsh) and Charlotte Stowell. Our common ancestors were John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

Ada was born on 11 April 1867 and her birth was registered in Burnley, Lancashire. As far as I have been able to establish she was the first of at least seven children.

On the 25 September 1886, at the age of 19, Ada married James Bowes at Holy Trinity church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

James and Ada had eleven children over the next twenty one years.

In the census returns of 1891 and 1911 Ada’s occupation is given as “cotton winder”. And in the 1939 Register she is described as doing “unpaid domestic duties”.

Ada died on 16 May 1950 and her death was reported in the Nelson Leader on 26 May 1950.

Ada Bowes - Nelson Leader 26 May 1950.png

Mrs Ada Bowes

At the Nelson Cemetery, RC Section, on Friday the interment took place of Mrs Ada Bowes, 76, Southfield Street, Nelson, whose death, at the age of 83, occurred the previous Tuesday. The Rev. Father Hope officiated.

Floral tributes from:- Lily and Harry; Jim and Eva and brother Jim and Madge; Agnes Corrigan; Bobbie and Brian; Mrs Lonsdale; and others.

Mass Offerings:- Dad and Ida; S.V.P and Married Ladies, St George’s; Margaret Dee; Mrs Laycock; Mr and Mrs Chapman; Bob, Eileen and the boys (Canada); Cissie McIntyre.

Undertakers:- Helliwell Funeral Service.

Sunday’s Obituary – Dent Stowell (1882-1948)

Dent Stowell is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. I have written about Dent before, herehere and here.

Dent was born on 14 July 1882 in Burnley, Lancashire to parents Thomas Stowell and Ann Wroe. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff (my 4x great grandparents).

If you have read my previous posts you will know that Dent had an interesting life :-

  • he served in the Black Watch Regiment in South Africa in the Boer War and in France during WW1, being wounded more than once.
  • he had an unhappy first marriage but found love for a second time with Helen Gordon – however he was found guilty of bigamously marrying Helen in 1918, before finally marrying her legally in 1939.
  • he had eight children from his two marriages.
  • he lived in Canada and in the United States of America.

Dent passed away on 28 March 1948 and I recently discovered the following inquest report in the Burnley Express of 31 March 1948.

Dent Stowell - Inquest 31 March 1948.png

Man’s sudden death during night

“Death from natural causes” was the verdict recorded by the Burnley Deputy Coroner (Mr C Waddington) at an inquest on Monday on Dent Stowell (65), machine operator, of 89 Marlborough Street, who died on Sunday morning.

Mrs Helen Stowell said that her husband had served in the Boer and 1914-18 wars, and in the latter was wounded and badly gassed. His general health had not been good since 1918, but he had never had a serious illness. For the past four months he had complained of chest pains, but would not seek medical advice.

On Friday, the pains became worse, and on Saturday he said the pain felt like a lump in his chest. That evening she gave him a Seidlitz powder in warm water and, later, Indian Brandy in warm water, and they retired about 11.15pm. At 12.15am her husband got out of bed, and put the light out before returning.

Immediately he had got back into bed she heard strange noises coming from his throat, and, on putting on the light, found him struggling for breath. She helped him to sit up, but he collapsed in her arms. She ran out of the house and asked a passer-by to send for the police, who, on arrival, told her her husband had passed away.

Mr R O Davidson, consulting surgeon, said that he had conducted a post-mortem examination, and in his opinion death was due to cardiac failure, due to myocardial degeneration and coronary sclerosis.

After Dent’s death Helen moved to America to be with family who had emigrated there. She lived for another 36 years before passing away in 1984. Helen’s family brought her to England for burial alongside Dent and their son Percy in Burnley Cemetery, Lancashire.

Dent and Helen had thirty years together and I suspect could tell some tales about their experiences and adventures.

Black Sheep Sunday – Lily Clegg (1896-1970)

Lily Clegg (nee Bowes) is my 3rd cousin 2x removed.

Lily was born on 17 June 1896 in Burnley, Lancashire, to parents James Bowes and Ada Welsh. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

Lily married Harry Clegg sometime in the September quarter of 1921.

In 1939, at the outbreak of World War Two Lily and Harry were living at Fife Street, Barrowford, Lancashire.

It is common practice during wartime for a blackout to be introduced. People who failed to keep their homes or premises in darkness were liable to stringent legal penalties.

Lily Clegg - Nelson Leader 8 Nov 1940.pngOn the 8 November 1940 two such cases were reported in the Nelson Leader. One of the offenders was Lily Clegg.

In the first case the offender was fined £1, including costs.

I have transcribed below the case against Lily.

A similar fine was imposed on Lily Clegg (43), of 31 Fife Street, Barrowford. PC Riley stated that at 7.30pm on Saturday, the 19th ult., he was on duty in Fife Street, Barrowford, when he saw a bright light shining from the front upstairs window of defendant’s house. The window was fitted with a double thickness curtain, but it was not drawn, and the window was entirely unscreened. He obtained a ladder, got into the room and extinguished the light. Later he saw defendant, who said she was responsible. She had gone out in the morning and the light had been burning all day. When told she would be reported she said she was sorry. Defendant was unable to appear, but she sent a letter in which she pleaded guilty and said she realised the seriousness of the offence. The window had full black-out curtains, but unfortunately they were not drawn.

 

A trawl through the local papers in any part of the country at this time will produce many similar cases.