Jane Emmott

Tombstone Tuesday – Thomas, Jane & Watson Emmott Dawson

I took this photograph on a recent visit to the Cowling Hill Baptist chapel graveyard in Cowling, West Yorkshire.

The grave is the resting place of Thomas Dawson (my 1st cousin 4x removed), his wife Jane (nee Emmott) and their son Watson Emmott Dawson.

Thomas was born in Cowling in 1851 to parents John Dawson and Elizabeth Benson. The census returns show that Thomas worked as a warp dresser, a worsted weaving overlooker and also an engine tenter in a local factory. In 1911 he was working as a farmer.

Sometime in Q1 of 1877 Thomas married Jane Emmott, also from Cowling. I haven’t done any research on Jane yet so have no information about her family. Although the Emmott family name has a long tradition in and around Cowling.

Thomas and Jane had at least three children:-

• Albert Frederick – born 8 February 1883

• James Willie – born 17 May 1885

• Watson Emmott – born 24 June 1887

If you follow the link above you will see that I wrote about Watson Emmott in a recent Military Monday post.

Thomas died on 18 January 1926 at the age of 74 and Jane died aged 90 on 2 February 1949. In between their deaths Watson Emmott passed away at the age of 57 on 14 October 1944.

Military Monday – Watson Emmott Dawson (1887-1944)

Watson Emmott Dawson is my 1st cousin 3x removed.  Our common ancestors are my 4x great grandparents John Dawson and Ann Watson.

Watson was born in Cowling, West Yorkshire, on 24 June 1887 to parents Thomas Dawson and Jane Emmott.

On the 3 April 1917 Watson went to Halifax and enlisted in the 4th West Riding Regiment.  His service number was 205100.

Just fifteen weeks later, on 18 July 1917, Watson was discharged from service with a £50 gratuity. He was described as being ‘physically unfit’.

Watson was admitted to the Wharncliffe War Hospital in Sheffield on 30 May 1917 for assessment. Unfortunately the written transcript is not very clear. But I can make out some of the words and phrases.

His behaviour is described as ‘childish’ and it is also reported that Watson believed that he was ‘the King of Greece’.

The Medical Board report cites the reason for his discharge as ‘imbecility’. It goes on to say that the condition originated at birth and was ‘not the result of or aggravated by ordinary military service.’

I feel sad for Watson. Whatever the circumstances here he was most probably ill and went through a difficult experience.

Watson lived until the age of 57. His death is registered in Q4 of 1944.