Hilda Coulam

Black Sheep Sunday – Hilda Maskell (nee Coulam)

Hilda Coulam is my wife’s 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are George Coulam and Sarah Ann Turner. Their common ancestors are James Padley and Sarah Bradshaw – my wife’s 3x great grandparents.

Hilda was born on 2 January 1911 at Tathwell, near Louth in Lincolnshire.

Sometime in the fourth quarter of 1932 Hilda married George Maskell – their marriage is registered in Louth.

Hilda appeared before Louth Borough Magistrates in July 1952 as reported in the Louth and North Lincolnshire Advertiser on 26 July (taken from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Hilda Maskell - Louth and North Lincolnshire Advertiser 26 July 1952.png

BOXED SCHOOL-BOY’S EARS

Louth Woman Bound Over By Court

While two children held him, a Louth woman hit a nine-year-old boy whom she thought had struck her own daughter with a cricket bat, it was alleged at Louth Borough Magistrates’ Court yesterday (Thursday). The woman, Mrs Hilda Maskell, of 31 Abbey Road, Louth, summoned for assaulting and battering the boy, was bound over to be of good behaviour for 12 months in the sum of £5.
The summons was preferred by Mrs Ellen Windle, mother of the boy, who was represented by Mr S Harmston. Capt. R H Helmer appeared for Mrs Maskell and entered a pleas of not guilty.
“This summons,” Mr Harmston told the Bench, “is brought to teach adults that they cannot take the law into their own hands and assault little children, whatever has happened.”

BOY’S STORY
Nine-year-old John Windle said that he left school on July 15th with Raymond Grebby, and added that he knew children named Ernie Taylor and Ingrid Spix.
“Mrs Maskell said something to them, and then Ingrid and Ernie came running after me and caught hold of me,” he alleged. “Mrs Maskell came and hit me on the face and then on the head. They held me while she hit me. She used a swear word to me.”
The boy added that he knew Maureen Maskell but said he had not hurt her at any time.
Mrs Maskell hit him four or five times on the face and then on the head. It hurt but he did not cry.
Answering Capt. Helmer, the boy said he had a cricket bat with him but denied hitting Maureen Maskell with it. He said he had never touched the girl and had not sworn at Mrs Maskell.

“GAVE HIM GOOD CLIP”
Sheila Addison (9), of 12 Abbey Road, Louth, said she saw the children holding John Windle. Mrs Maskell hit him four or five times while he was being held.
Raymond Grebby, 60 St Bernard’s Avenue, Louth, said he left school with John. He saw a boy hitting Maureen Maskell, but John did not hit her. He told Capt. Helmer that the boy who hit the girl also had a bat, as well as John. “John didn’t hit her because he was with me,” he said.
Mrs Dorothy Margaret Fieldsend, of 30 Abbey Road, Louth, appearing on subpoena, said she was looking out of her window when she saw children chasing John Windle. “The next thing I looked up and saw Mrs Maskell was giving him a good clip across the ear,” she added.
Mrs Ellen Windle, of 28 Broadley Crescent, the boy’s mother, said as she was going home Sheila Addison and Mrs Fieldsend spoke to her. When she got home she saw that John’s face was “all red, and so was his head.”
She told Capt. Helmer that she had had a complaint about John, who got blamed for a lot he did not do.The complaint had been made by Mr Maskell, witness told Mr Harmston.

“GIRL HIT WITH BAT”
First witness for the defence, Mrs Ethel May Willoughby, of 19 Abbey Road, Louth, said she was speaking to John Windle when three little girls came up. John chased them with a cricket bat – “a large one” – and hit Maureen with it. She ran off crying.
“I have no doubt he was the boy,” witness continued. “Mrs Maskell walked down the road, caught John and smacked his ears two or three times. “I should most probably have done the same thing had it been my little girl,” she added.
Mr Harmston: You don’t like John, do you? – I like all children.
Answer my question. You don’t like John? – There are a lot of children I’m not exactly fond of.
And John is one of them? – Yes.
Mrs Willoughby added that she had several times stopped other children hitting the boy.

“LAUGHED AT ME”
Mrs Hilda Maskell said that when Maureen arrived home she was crying. “I went up to John,” she said. “Two children were holding him. He had a cricket bat, and I boxed him on the ears and said “Perhaps that will teach you a lesson for the future.” He turned round and laughed at me.” The boy had previously used bad language, she alleged.
Mr Harmston: Did you see John hit Maureen? – No.
Did you ask John if he had hit Maureen? – No.
Did you think it right to hit this small boy while he was being held? – No, I don’t think so. I did it under very great stress.
Capt. Helmer, making his submission, commented: “Young people nowadays seem to imagine that they can behave as they like, and if anyone looks at them or touches them they can be summoned for assault.

CHAIRMAN’S ADVICE
“You have seen the little boy. All they want is a tinsel halo and a pair of wings to allow him to float away. We don’t hear of Master John crying after his ears are boxed, but we do know that the little girl was crying.”
But, added Capt. Helmer, there must be a technical offence. It might be a pity to take the law into one’s own hands, but if more people did so there would not be so much juvenile delinquency, he added.
After the Bench had retired the chairman, Ald. A E Maxey, pointed out to Mrs Windle that she had admitted that there had been a complaint against her son. “You must take the boy under hand and stop him.” he added.
The chairman told Mrs Maskell: “We find you guilty. You know you must not take the law into your own hands, however you feel about it. If everyone took notice of your advocate we should have the Court full every time.”
Mrs Maskell was then bound over and ordered to pay 4/- costs.