Habergham Eaves

Sunday’s Obituary – John Espley (1869-1945)

John Espley is my wife’s 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Joseph Booth Espley and Christiana Boyle. Their common ancestor is Martha Espley – my wife’s 2x great grandmother.

John was born on 5 May 1869 in Macclesfield, Cheshire.

In the 1891 census John was with his uncle & aunt Frederick Espley and Frances Espley in Biddulph, Staffordshire. He was working as an iron turner. By the time of the following census in 1901 John was living in Burnley, Lancashire working as a builders labourer.

On 7 December 1901 John married Sarah Booth at St Matthew the Apostle church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

Sarah was a young widow of 25. Her maiden name was Sarah Baines Turner. She had married Samuel Booth in the first quarter of 1897 in Burnley. Samuel died three years later. This left Sarah on her own with three children under three years old – Betty, Jane and Samuel.

By the time of the 1911 census John and Sarah had six children of their own but sadly two died in infancy. By now John was working in the water department of the Burnley Borough Council.

John was a conscientious employee for the water department and eventually retired from there in 1934. The Burnley Express of Saturday 5 May 1934 reported on his retirement (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

John Espley - Burnley Express 5 May 1934.png

THIRTY-THREE YEARS WITH WATER DEPARTMENT

After completing 33 years service with the Burnley Corporation Water Department, Mr. John Espley, of 14 Hawk Street, enters into a well-earned retirement today. Mr. Espley, who is 65 years of age, has served under three managers, and for over 20 years has been a foreman with the department.
He holds the proud record of never having been late for 32 years. One day, when he had been with the department about 12 months, he arrived five minutes late and was sent home for three days. He has never been late since! Mr. Espley is interested in gardening, with which he occupies much of his spare time.

John’s retirement lasted for eleven years before he died on 4 June 1945. He was buried three days later in Burnley cemetery.

The Burnley Express reported on his death on Saturday 9 June 1945.

John Espley - Burnley Express 9 June 1945.png

MR. JOHN ESPLEY

The death of Mr. John Espley (76) took place at his home, 81 Albert Street, Burnley, on Monday, after a short illness. Mr. Espley, a well-known Fulledge resident, was employed by the Burnley Corporation Water Department for about 33 years, being a foreman for about 20 years. He retired about 11 years ago. The funeral took place at the Burnley Cemetery on Thursday, preceded by a service in the Latter Day Saints’ Chapel, Rosegrove, with which he was connected. Elder John R. Moore and Elder W. Duckworth officiated. Arrangements: Mr. Joseph Harling, 29 Yorkshire Street.

Sarah lived for a further 13 months – she was buried on 29 July 1946 in Burnley Cemetery.

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Wedding Wednesday – William Edward Easton & Dora Brown

William Edward Easton is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. He was was born on 5 May 1897 to parents Robert Fraser Easton and Christiana Astin. Our common ancestors are Robert Astin and Nancy Dyson my 3x great grandparents.

In the 1901 and 1911 census returns William and his parents and siblings lived in Berry Street, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

On the 4 July 1924 William married Dora Brown and a report of their wedding was in the Burnley Express the following day (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Easton & Dora Brown - Burnley Express 5 July 1924.png

INTERESTING BURNLEY WEDDING

The marriage took place at Holy Trinity Church yesterday, the Rev. W R Coombes officiating, of Mr. Wm. Edward Easton, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Fraser Easton, of Lansdowne Street, Burnley, to Miss Dora Brown, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A H Brown, of Padiham Road, Burnley. Both are members of well-known families, the bridegroom’s father being a director of the firm of Messrs. Wm. Easton, Sons and Co., Ltd., whilst the bride’s father is a well-known wholesale fish merchant. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a dress of white broche marocain trimmed with pearls, with hat to match, and carried a bouquet of white roses and lilies of the valley. Her chief bridesmaid, Miss Eleanor Wiggan wore a pale blue dress of watered moire, trimmed with silver, and hat to match, and the other bridesmaid, Miss Dorothy Easton (sister of the bridegroom) wore a dress of mauve crepe de Chine. Both bridesmaids carried bouquets of sweet peas.

The bridegroom was accompanied by Mr. Percy Brown (brother of the bride) as best man, and Mr. Sidney Smith (cousin of the bride) as groomsman. After the reception at the Empress Hotel, Mr. and Mrs. Easton went to the Isle of Man for their honeymoon.

Sunday’s Obituary – George Dacre Crewdson (1890-1943)

Clara Shackleton is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are James Shackleton and Mary Elizabeth Haworth. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane – my 3x great grandparents.

Clara was born on 20 April 1900 and her birth was registered in Burnley, Lancashire.

On 30 August 1922 Clara married George Dacre Crewdson at Holy Trinity Church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

George was born on 8 June 1890 – his birth was also registered in Burnley.

When the 1939 Register was taken on 29 September 1939 George and Clara were living at 7 Church Street, Briercliffe, Burnley. George was employed as a “cotton loom overlooker” and Clara’s occupation was described as “unpaid domestic duties”. Also living with them were two children – Eveline and James. Their first daughter, Irene, was born in 1923 but sadly died the same year.

Within three and half years Clara would be left a widow with two children following the death of George at the age of 52.

The Nelson Leader of 29 January 1943 reported on George’s death as a result of what at first appears to be an innocuous incident at work.

George Daker Crewdson - Nelson Leader 29 January 1943.png

Fatal Pin-prick

OVERLOOKER’S DEATH FROM SEPTICAEMIA

A pin-prick sustained while handling pickers at Primrose Mill, Harle Syke, was held responsible for the death of George Dacre Crewdson (51), 7 Church Street, Briercliffe, a power loom overlooker employed by the South View Manufacturing Company, when the East Lancashire Coroner (Mr F Rowland) conducted an inquest at Brierfield Town Hall on Wednesday morning.
The widow was represented by Mr Riley; Mr Howarth appeared on behalf of the employers, and Miss Blackburn, H M Inspector of Factories, was also present.
The widow, Mrs Clara Crewdson, said her husband was a healthy man and never had a serious illness. During the evening of Friday January 8th, he complained that the first finger on his right hand was sore, and said he had got something in it at his work, but he did not say when. He explained that he was putting some pickers on and caught his finger on one of these, but whether it was a piece of hide or not which had entered the finger he did not know. Whatever it was, it had burnt in owing to the picker being hot. He bathed the finger in hot water and applied a poultice, but despite further treatment, the infection became worse. He followed his employment until 5.30pm on Wednesday, January 13th, and on the 15th consulted Dr Lamberti, who treated the injury and ordered her husband to go to Victoria Hospital the following day. He paid two visits to the hospital, and ought to have gone there again on the 18th, but he was too ill to do so. Dr Lamberti, and later Dr Munroe, visited him frequently, and on the 21st a surgeon was called in. Despite this attention, however, her husband died last Saturday.
Sam Riley, another overlooker employed at Primrose Mill, said he was in the storeroom during the afternoon of January 11th, and in the course of a conversation Crewdson said he had injured the first finger of his right hand, at the same time holding up the bandaged finger, which was afterwards seen by other employees.
Dr Lamberti said the finger was septic when Crewdson first consulted him on January 15th. It was incised at the hospital, but the man’s condition grew worse, and his death on the 23rd was the result of septicaemia. Witness added that when he first examined the finger he found a small pin-prick between the first and second joints.
Witness agreed with Mr Riley that this could have been caused by a splinter which entered the finger as the man’s hand slid over the picker.
Dr Palin, Police Surgeon for the Brierfield district, said the post-mortem examination revealed the cause of death to be septic pneumonia due to infection from the finger. As the finger was very swollen the point of entry had passed away.
Witness agreed with Mr Riley that the medical history from January 8th onwards was consistent with the man having met with such an injury.
The Coroner said there had been great doubt as to the continuity between the alleged injury and the man’s death, but that had now been cleared away. He was quite satisfied that Crewdson did injure his finger in the way he had said at his work. Evidently it was just a pin-prick, and the man probably did not think at first that it was serious; nevertheless, he and his wife applied the necessary treatment from the outset. The man, being a conscientious workman, continued to follow his employment until he consulted the doctor on the 15th, but by that time septicaemia had got hold, and this caused his death. There was a chain of cause and effect between the injury and the man’s death, therefore the proper verdict was one of “Accidental death”. The Coroner said he did not doubt that the injury was caused while the man was following his employment, and deeply sympathised with the widow.
Mr Howarth expressed the regret of the employers, who recognised that they had lost a conscientious workman, and Mr Riley suitably replied on behalf of the widow.

Clara remarried to Smith Bannister sometime in the fourth quarter of 1946. She passed away in 1966 in Blackpool, Lancashire.

Sunday’s Obituary – James Bowes (1861-1955)

James Bowes is the husband of my 2nd cousin 3x removed Ada Welsh.

James was born on 23 December 1861 in Burnley, Lancashire. he married Ada at Holy Trinity church, Habergham eaves, Lancashire on 25 September 1886.

Over the next twenty one years James and Ada had eleven children.

In the census returns for 1891, 1901 and 1911 James was described as a “cotton beamer”.

James died on 12 February 1955 and his death was reported in the Nelson Leader on 18 February 1955.

James Bowes - Nelson Leader 18 Feb 1955.png

Mr James Bowes

In the RC Section of Nelson Cemetery, on Tuesday, the remains were interred of Mr James Bowes, 76 Southfield Street, Nelson, who died on Saturday, aged 93 years. The Rev. Fr. Hope officiated. One of the oldest blind pensioners in Nelson, Mr Bowes is survived by three daughters and two sons. Solemn Requiem Mass was celebrated in St. George’s Church by Fr. Hope prior to the interment.

There were no flowers by request.

Mass offerings:- daughters Ida, Eva, Lilly; Mrs Dee and Mr Chapman; Mrs Laycock; Mrs Corrigan; Katie Hargreaves, Bob, Eileen (Canada); S.V.P. Saint George.

Undertakers:- Nelson Co-op, Funeral service.

Sunday’s Obituary – Ada Bowes (nee Welsh) 1867-1950

Ada Welsh is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. Her parents were Patrick Welsh (or sometimes Walsh) and Charlotte Stowell. Our common ancestors were John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

Ada was born on 11 April 1867 and her birth was registered in Burnley, Lancashire. As far as I have been able to establish she was the first of at least seven children.

On the 25 September 1886, at the age of 19, Ada married James Bowes at Holy Trinity church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

James and Ada had eleven children over the next twenty one years.

In the census returns of 1891 and 1911 Ada’s occupation is given as “cotton winder”. And in the 1939 Register she is described as doing “unpaid domestic duties”.

Ada died on 16 May 1950 and her death was reported in the Nelson Leader on 26 May 1950.

Ada Bowes - Nelson Leader 26 May 1950.png

Mrs Ada Bowes

At the Nelson Cemetery, RC Section, on Friday the interment took place of Mrs Ada Bowes, 76, Southfield Street, Nelson, whose death, at the age of 83, occurred the previous Tuesday. The Rev. Father Hope officiated.

Floral tributes from:- Lily and Harry; Jim and Eva and brother Jim and Madge; Agnes Corrigan; Bobbie and Brian; Mrs Lonsdale; and others.

Mass Offerings:- Dad and Ida; S.V.P and Married Ladies, St George’s; Margaret Dee; Mrs Laycock; Mr and Mrs Chapman; Bob, Eileen and the boys (Canada); Cissie McIntyre.

Undertakers:- Helliwell Funeral Service.

Sunday’s Obituary – Timothy Eglin (1902-1913)

Timothy Eglin is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Thomas William Eglin and Margaret Ann Bancroft. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson, my 4x great grandparents.

Timothy was the fifth of ten children and his birth is registered in the first quarter of 1902. In the 1911 census the family are living at Habergham Eaves near Burnley, Lancashire.

On Christmas Eve 1913 the family were rocked by a tragic accident which ended the all too short life of Timothy. Details of the inquest are reported in the Burnley News of 27 December 1913.

Burnley News 27 Dec 1913.png

BOY’S FATAL FALL – The story of how Timothy Eglin, an eleven-year-old boy met an untimely end at Cliviger, was told at an inquest conducted by the Acting Coroner, Mr D N Haslewood, on Friday morning, at Habergham Farm, Habergham Eaves, Cliviger. Thomas William Eglin, the father, gave evidence of identification, and Mary Eglin, deceased’s four-year-old sister, said her brother had been swinging in the washhouse on Wednesday afternoon, on a rope, which was fastened at one end to the ceiling, and at the other end to the wringing machine. Whilst he was swinging, the machine fell over on her brother’s head. Alice Eglin, an older sister, told of hearing a noise coming from the direction of the washhouse, at 3 o’clock on Wednesday afternoon, and on going there she found the deceased with the top part of the machine resting on his head on the floor. With the assistance of Albert Halstead, she lifted her brother up, and Halstead carried him home. Dr. Hodgson, of Burnley, was sent for, and on arrival he found the boy dead, with the back of his head crushed in, and a cut on his forehead. A verdict of “Accidental death” was returned.

Thomas and Margaret had already experienced the loss of another child when their first born, Robert Watson, died in infancy, less than three months old in 1895.

 

Mystery Monday – Martha Blackburn (nee Stowell)

Mystery Monday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

Closely related to Madness Monday only these missing ancestors might not cause madness! Mystery Monday is where you can post about mystery ancestors or mystery records – anything in your genealogy and family history research which is currently unsolved. This is a great way to get your fellow genealogy bloggers to lend their eyes to what you’ve found so far and possibly help solve the mystery.

Martha Stowell is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. Her parents are Thomas Stowell and Ann Wroe. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

Martha was born on 23 July 1867. She was baptised on 18 August 1867 at Holy Trinity Church, Habergham Eaves, Burnley, Lancashire.

I have Martha in the 1871 and 1881 census returns. I then have a marriage for Martha to Robert Blackburn on 17 May 1884 at St Mary of the Assumption, Burnley, Lancashire. Details of this are from the Online Parish Clerks for the County of Lancashire Project

And then…..the trail goes cold.

I can’t find Martha on any later census or on the 1939 Register. Neither can I find her in the travel and immigration records online.

I know she was still alive in 1931. Her sister, Margaret Ann Gerrey died that year. Here is a link to my Sunday’s Obituary post. You will see among the floral tributes is one from “sister Martha and family”.

So Martha remains a MYSTERY!!

However I am not the only one interested in the whereabouts of Martha Blackbun (formerly Stowell).

Below is a notice from the Burnley Express of 24 April 1942.

Burnley Express 29 April 1942.png

Re MARTHA BLACKBURN
(formerly STOWELL)

INFORMATION is desired respecting the above named who was the wife of Robert Blackburn and who in 1886 resided at 252, Cog Lane, Habergham Eaves near Burnley and later is believed to have resided in Haslingden and Earby. Any person who can give information as to her present whereabouts or (if dead) the date and place of her death is requested to communicate with

SPRAKE & RANSON
Solicitors
19, Union Street, Accrington
Tel. No. 2226

Hmm should I get in touch and see if they can help me after all this time……maybe not.