Ellen Gawthrop

Black Sheep Sunday – Throup Shuttleworth

Throup Shuttleworth is the husband of my 1st cousin 2x removed Florrie Dawson.

Florrie was born on 1 February 1884 in Kildwick, West Yorkshire. Her parents are John Dawson and Elizabeth Bradley. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ellen Gawthrop – my 2x great grandparents.

Florrie and Throup married sometime in the March quarter of 1908 in Keighley, West Yorkshire.

Regrettably Throup made at least three appearances in the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer. Once in 1924 and twice (for the same incident) in 1933 (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Throup Shuttleworth - Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer 9 April 1924.png

9 April 1924

For theft of a wallet and money from a house at Steeton, Throup Shuttleworth (39), labourer, was sentenced to a month’s hard labour.

Throup Shuttleworth - Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer 29 May 1933.png

29 May 1933

WOMAN KILLED

Side-car Smashed in Silsden Road Crash

Mrs. Marion Simpson (27), a weaver, of North Street, Silsden was killed in a collision on the Steeton-Silsden Road last night between a motor-cycle combination in which she was riding and a motor car.
The cycle combination was being driven towards Steeton by Leonard Owens (33), motor mechanic, of Langbar, Ilkley. Mrs. Simpson was in the sidecar, and her husband, Harold Simpson (33), a weaver, was on the pillion seat. On the Steeton side of the bridge over the River Aire, the combination came into collision with a small saloon car driven towards Silsden by Throup Shuttleworth, of High Street, Steeton, who was the only occupant.
The sidecar was smashed, and Mrs. Simpson received extensive injuries, dying almost immediately.

Thorup Shuttleworth - Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer 17 June 1933.png

17 June 1933

Following a collision with a motor-cycle combination near the River Aire Bridge at Steeton, in which a young Silsden woman was killed, Throup Shuttleworth, motor engineer, of High Street, Steeton, was fined £5 at Keighley yesterday for driving a motor-car without due care. He was also fined 10s. for not having a driving licence. Defendant said the collision was an unavoidable accident.

You might just want to reflect on the different sentences for the two offences.

Throup passed away in 1938 at the age of 53.

Sunday’s Obituary – Jane Dawson (nee Hargreaves) 1855-1922

Jane Hargreaves was born in Cowling, West Yorkshire about 1855.

Sometime in the September quarter of 1877 Jane married my great grand uncle Isaac Dawson in Keighley, West Yorkshire. Isaac’s parents are John Dawson and Ellen Gawthrop – my 2x great grandparents.

For much of their married life Isaac and Jane lived at Steeton with Eastburn, near Keighley. They had six children but three died young – only Matthew, Annie and Maggie lived until adulthood.

By the time of the 1911 census Isaac, Jane and Annie had moved to Morecambe, Lancashire. Isaac was employed as a “Company housekeeper”.

Jane passed away on 17 February 1922. The Morecambe Guardian published the following obituary (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Jane Dawson (nee Hargreaves) - Morecambe Guardian 25 February 1922.png

THE LATE MRS JANE DAWSON

On Tuesday afternoon the Rev. F Etherton Blake conducted the funeral service of the late Mrs Dawson, 39 Clarendon Road, in the Parliament Street Church, W.E. The Dawson family, some ten years ago, came from their Yorkshire home at Eastburn to Morecambe. They have life-long associations with Primitive Methodism, and to that extent the Church suffers the loss of a valuable devotee. Since Christmas Mrs Dawson has suffered acutely, and ever since been under the shadow of death. On February 17th she passed away at the age of 67 years and leaves a sorrowing husband, bereft son and two mourning daughters.

Sundays Obituary – Susannah Gawthrop (1830-1907)

Susannah Gawthrop (nee Benson) is the wife of my 2nd great grand uncle. In other words she married a brother of my 2x great grandmother (Ellen Gawthrop)

Susannah Benson was born on 16 October 1830 in Cowling, West Yorkshire.

Sometime in the September quarter of 1852  Susannah married Joseph Gawthrop. Over the next twenty years Joseph and Susannah had eight children.

Their first child, John, became a well known Wesleyan Methodist minister. I have written about John before – here and here.

Joseph and Susannah lived in Cowling all their lives. Joseph’s occupation in the census returns from 1861 to 1891 was a farmer at Green Syke, Cowling.

On 25 April 1900 Joseph passed away and was buried three days later at Holy Trinity Church, Cowling.

According to the census return for 1901 Susannah was still living at Green Syke with her youngest son Alfred and his family – Alfred now appears to be running the farm.

Very sadly tragedy struck on Friday 22 November 1907. The Bradford Daily Telegraph published the following story on 25 November.

Susannah Gawthrop (Benson) - Bradford Daily Telegraph 25 November 1907.png

Bradford Daily Telegraph taken from British Newspaper Archives

BURNING FATALITY AT COWLING

OLD LADY’S SAD DEATH

On Friday night Mrs Susannah Gawthrop, of Cowling, was reading a newspaper by candle light, when the paper caught fire.

In a few minutes she was in flames, and sustained severe injuries, being badly burned about the neck, face and arms. Death took place on Saturday night.

Mrs Gawthrop who was in her 76th year, was the mother of the Rev. John Gawthrop, a popular Wesleyan minister at Huntingdon.

The tragic incident has caused quite a sensation in the village, and general sympathy has been extended to the relatives on all hands.

A Coroners Inquest was held at the Cowling Liberal Club on 25 November 1907. The verdict was that death was caused “By misadventure, set fire to her clothing causing death by shock the next day”.

Susannah Gawthrop - Inquest 25 November 1907.jpg

Coroners Notebooks 1852-1909 taken from http://www.ancestry.co.uk

Susannah was buried on 28 November 1907 at Holy Trinity Church, Cowling.

Military Monday – Thomas Baldwin (1888-1917)

Military Monday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

We all have ancestors who have served in the military. Military Monday is a place to post their images, stories and records of their service in various branches of the military.

Thomas Baldwin is my 1st cousin 2x removed. He was born sometime in the September quarter of 1888 in Eastburn, near Keighley to parents Francis Baldwin and Ellen Dawson. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ellen Gawthrop, my 2x great grandparents.

Thomas is a cousin of my grandfather, Joseph Dawson and also of Prince Dawson who died in WW1 on 21 December 1915.

In the 1901 census at the age of 12 Thomas was working as a spinner at a local worsted mill. Ten years later the 1911 census describes his occupation as a warp dresser.

Unfortunately there are no surviving military records for Thomas on either Ancestry or Find My Past so I can’t find out very much information about his service.

I know that he served in the 2nd Battalion / 4th Division of Duke of Wellingtons (West Riding Regiment) holding the rank of Private and his service number was 267218.

Thomas died of wounds on 4 May 1917 while serving in France & Flanders. It is highly likely that he was wounded during the Battle of Arras.  According to information on the excellent website Craven’s Part in The Great War news of his death wasn’t given to his mother until August 1917.

From the same source it seems that Thomas was a prominent player in the Eastburn Cricket Club’s first eleven.

Thomas is buried in Douai Communal Cemetery in France.

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The following information is from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website.

Douai was occupied by French troops and the Royal Naval Air Service on the 22nd September, 1914, and captured by the Germans on the 1st October; it remained in enemy hands until the 17th October, 1918. The 42nd Casualty Clearing Station was posted in the town from the 28th October, 1918, to the 25th November, 1919.

Douai Communal Cemetery was used during the occupation years of 1914-18 by the Germans for prisoners of war and British, French, Russian, Rumanian and Italian soldiers, as well as German soldiers were buried in it.

During the 1939-45 War Douai was in British hands until the German break through in May, 1940. The 1st Corps Headquarters were at Cuincy, on the western edge of the town, from October, 1939 onwards and Douai was one of the towns from which the Allied advance into Belgium was launched early in May, 1940, only to be followed by the collapse of the French and Belgian units and the consequent withdrawal of the British element towards Dunkirk.

There are now 222 Commonwealth burials of the 1914-1918 war commemorated in this site, 19 being unidentified. There are a further 46 Commonwealth burials of the 1939-1945 war here. There are also 247 French, 113 Russsian and 13 Romanian burials of the 1914-1918 war here.

Madness Monday – High Royds

Madness Monday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Madness Monday simply create a post with the main focus being an ancestor who either suffered some form of mental illness or an ancestor who might be hard to locate and drives you mad.

Although it’s not Mental Health Awareness Week 2017 in the UK until May I decided to add a blog post to the theme Madness Monday.

This was prompted by some of the results of searching the 1939 Register available on Find My Past.

I was surprised, or more truthfully saddened, to discover that I had three relatives in the West Riding Mental Hospital in Aireborough, West Yorkshire on 29 September 1939 – the date that the 1939 Register was completed.

Anyone local to Leeds and surrounding areas will know the place as High Royds or simply Menston (the area where the hospital was located) . Here’s a link to a website about High Royds Hospital  written in the early 1970’s by F E Rogers (a former employee at the hospital).

My three relatives who were patients at the time are:-

Marion Dawson (b 28 March 1905). She is my 2nd cousin 2x removed and her parents were John Dawson and Elizabeth Smith. Our common ancestors are Thomas Dawson and Margaret Snowden – my 3x great grandparents. I have no other information about Marion – she was only 5 at the time of the 1911 census – the only other available document before 1939 in which she was recorded.

I don’t know when she was admitted to hospital but at some point she was discharged from High Royds and lived until the age of 80 when she died in February 1986.

Selina Dawson (b 27 August 1877). She is my 1st cousin 2x removed and her parents were Martin Dawson and Margaret Spencer. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ellen Gawthrop – my 2x great grandparents. I found Selina in all the census returns from 1881 to 1911. She lived in a small geographical area between Keighley and Skipton throughout all those years – Steeton with Eastburn, Sutton in Craven and Glusburn.

In 1891 she worked as a “worsted spinner”; in 1901 she was described as “house keeper for father”; and in 1911 she was a “confectioner”.

I don’t know when Selina was admitted to High Royds. However her death is recorded in the September quarter of 1941 and registered in the Wharfedale district. This is the same registration district as Menston – so I suspect that Selina died in High Royds at the age of 64.

Watson Emmott Dawson (b 24 Jun 1887). He is my 2nd cousin 3x removed and his parents were Thomas Dawson and Jane Emmott. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson – my 4x great grandparents. I have Watson in the 1891 to 1911 census returns living in Cowling, West Yorkshire all these years. In 1901 Watson is described as an “errand boy” and in 1911 as “farmers son working on farm”.

As with Marion and Selina I don’t know when Watson was admitted to High Royds. I know that he died on 14 October 1944 and his death at the age of 57 is registered in the Wharfedale district – so I believe that he died in High Royds. Watson is buried at the Cowling Hill Baptist Chapel.

It is possible that Selina and Watson were discharged sometime after 1939 and readmitted to High Royds or it is equally possible that they both spent a considerable period of time as patients and died without ever being released. Either way not a very happy end to their lives.

Marion, Selina and Watson are not my only relatives to find themselves in a “mental hospital” or asylum. However I do wonder about the extent of their illness and if they knew they were all there together in 1939.

Workday Wednesday – Israel Gawthrop (1840-1906)

Israel Gawthrop is my 2x great uncle – he is the brother of my 2x great grandmother Ellen Gawthrop and the son of Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley.

Israel was born in Cowling, West Yorkshire. His first occupations in the census returns are

1851 – farmers son employed on farm

1861 – cotton carder

1871 – cotton carder

In 1881 he is recorded as “manager of cotton mill” – and I believe this is a position he held until his death in 1906.

There are numerous references to Israel in the local newspapers of the time. I have picked the article below because I think it reflects a man who had respect for the workforce in the mill he managed and that the “hands” as they are described in the article respected him as a boss. When you imagine what working conditions must have been like in the Victorian mills of Lancashire and elsewhere then to have management and the workers all pulling together must have been good for everyone – or at least a better place to work than some.

SABDEN

TREAT AND PRESENTATION

On Saturday last, the senior employees of Jas. Suttard and Sons met at Mrs. Badger’s Commercial Hotel, to partake of a treat supplied chiefly at the expense of the firms who have replenished the mill with new machinery.

The dinner was of a most recherche character, and reflected the greatest credit upon the worthy hostess. The juvenile portion (or half-timers) did justice to a substantial tea provided for them in the Oddfellows’ Hall, where the senior portion afterwards adjourned, and participated in the subsequent proceedings.

Mr. Israel Gawthrop (manager) was elected as chairman, and Mr. James Proctor (book-keeper) as vice-chairman.

In opening the proceedings the Chairman said, – If there was one thing that affected him more than another in coming to Sabden, it was the fear of having an uncultivated lot of hands to contend with. The putting in of new machinery was Israel Gawthrop Jul 1873very trifling as compared to it. But, to his great surprise, he met with a very decent set of hands to conduct (hear, hear). When they came to have a class of hands who wanted nothing but right, and a master who wanted nothing more, it was a very easy task to stand between them; he was very glad to be able to say that, both as regarded the masters and operatives, for he had never heard any of the workpeople say “I won’t” when he asked them to do anything (hear, hear). He did not know that he ever met with a firm more urgent to get on than those under whom they worked. The masters had been very diligent in their business habits, and their concern at Sabden had required a great deal – the machinery

putting in, and all the other things to attend to – but he was very happy to tell them that it had not affected the masters, and they need not be frightened that anyone would come and say “You must stop work” (applause). They had met with some energetic and upright masters, who were worthy of a good class of hands, so he hoped they would do their best, and he was sure the masters would do the same to them (applause).

The Vice-chairman next called upon several gentlemen, who spoke in eulogistic terms of Mr. Gawthrop’s past conduct, after which – Mr. S Hartley (card-master) presented the souvenirs, which consisted of a handsome timepiece of black Parian marble, with a brass plate placed under the dial, which bore the following inscription tersely engraved: “Presented to Mr. Israel Gawthrop, manager at the Victoria Mill, Sabden, by the workpeople, as a token of respect and esteem, July 19th 1873.” There was also a beautiful work-box presented to his wife. The combined presents amounted to near £10.

In returning thanks for the testimonial Mr. Gawthrop said that so far as he was aware, he had done nothing to merit the present. His object in coming to the place was to try to collect as good a class of hands as he could, and having collected them, he had tried to do justice both to them and his masters. He hoped the good feeling that existed between them that night might be of lasting duration (hear, hear). Whenever the present stood before him it would remind him of their respect and kindness, and act as a stimulant to do what was right and just (hear, hear) – and he assured them it would be handed down to his children, hoping it would have the same effect upon them (hear, hear). In conclusion, he recapitulated his thanks, and said he would try to do justice to all parties, if he did not do right his conscience pricked him, and he accepted the present as given in that feeling (loud applause).

The rest of the evening was spent in singing, games, etc. Mr. R Laycock presided most efficiently at the piano.

Votes of thanks were given to all those who had in any degree contributed to the dinner or entertainment.

The National Anthem terminated the proceedings of the evening.

Wedding Wednesday – Ellen Gawthrop & John James Pilkington

Ellen Gawthrop is my 1st cousin 3x removed.  She married John James Pilkington on 27 September 1900 at the Wesleyan Chapel in Sabden, Lancashire.

I recently found this report of the wedding in the Burnley Express and couldn’t resist sharing it.  I can’t believe that the report actually includes what appears to be a full list of all the presents!!!

Certainly the happy couple were not going to be short of the odd silver tea spoon.  And perhaps Mr. & Mrs. Bamber were a bit embarrassed by their gift and felt the need to describe the size – a “massive flower stand”.

Ellen Gawthrop wedding 1900

Interesting Wedding – At two o’clock on Thursday afternoon, the Wesleyan Chapel at Sabden, was the scene of a wedding, the bride being Miss Ellen Gawthrop, Sabden, the third daughter of Mr. Israel Gawthrop, the esteemed manager of the  firm of Messrs. James Stuttard and Sons, Sabden, and the bridegroom, Mr. John James Pilkington, of Blackburn, but formerly of Sabden, and son of the late Mr. John Pilkington, Sabden.  Unusual interest was evinced in the wedding by the villagers, and the interesting ceremony, which was performed by the Rev. J. H. Wilkinson, Wesleyan minister, of Padiham, was witnessed by a very large company of friends.  The interior of the chapel had been decorated with choice flowers, etc., and the ceremony was altogether an imposing one.  The bride, who was given away by her father, Mr. Israel Gawthrop, looked exceedingly charming in a rich dress of white alpaca, trimmed with lace, with hat to match.  She was attended by Miss Annie Gawthrop and Miss Bertha Gawthrop, sisters, who were attired in dresses of heliotrope, with grey felt hats, and Miss May Jackson, Padiham, and Miss Clarris Entwistle (nieces), who wore dresses of cream alpaca, with whitehats and shoes to match.  Mr. Frank Entwistle, brother-in-law to the bridegroom, acted as best man.  After the ceremony the wedding party, to the number of about 50, had a drive to Higher Hodder Bridge, where they were entertained to a sumptuous repast.  Mr. and Mrs. Pilkington left in the afternoon, amidst the heartiest good wishes of all, for Scarborough, where they intend to spend the honeymoon.

The following is the list of presents:- Mr. and Mrs. Gawthrop, cheque; Mr. and Mrs. I Gawthrop, dinner service; Mr. and Mrs. Jackson (Padiham), eider down quilt; Mr. and Mrs. Haworth, two door mats; Mr. and Mrs. Wilkinson, silver spirit kettle; Mr. and Mrs. Entwistle, toilet set; Mr. and Mrs. Pilkington, silver coffee pot and cruet; Miss A. Gawthrop and Mr. T. L. Anderton, marble timepiece; Miss B. Gawthrop and Mr. R. Anderton, tea service; Miss Gregson, silver salts in case; Miss Birtwistle and Mr. Dixon (Padiham), one dozen silver tea spoons, Miss Webster, silver cake knife; Mr. and Mrs. Ayrey, oak barometer; Miss Whittles, bedroom slippers and salts; Mrs. Bailey, cushion; Miss Foulds and Miss Birtwell, silk head-rest and tea cosy; Miss McLachlan, hall brushes with mirror; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ingham (Blackburn), half a dozen silver desert spoons and forks; Miss Mary and Master Harry Jackson (Padiham), cheese dish and pickle jar; Mr. and Mrs. Stuttard (Read Hall), travelling clock and cheque; Miss Haworth, one dozen silver tea spoons; Miss Brotherton, brass paper rack; Miss Nuttall, plaques; Mrs. Duerden, set of jugs; Mrs. Fish, one dozen silver tea spoons in case; Mr. and Mrs. Hopkinson, cheque; Mrs. Townsend (Manchester), silver cake basket; Miss Burton, silver cruet and jam spoons; Miss Bradshaw, d’oyleys; Mr. Burton (Fence), timepiece; Mr. and Mrs. Kay (Darwen), mirror in brass frame; Mr. Harry Pilkington (America), silver sugar sifter; Mr. and Mrs. E. Standing, brass photo frame; Mr. and Mrs. H. Barnes (Darwen), picture; Mrs. Harwood (Darwen), silver cake knife; Mr. and Mrs. Bamber, massive flower stand; Miss Whittaker, fruit dish; Mr. and Mrs. Bradshaw (Southport), half a dozen silver tea spoons and tray cloth; Miss Anderton; trinket set; Miss Standing, brass stand; Mr. Rigby (Swinton), half a dozen tea, desert, and table spoons; Miss Gawthrop, drawing-room chair; the Misses Rowland (Blackpool), Dresden vase and afternoon tray cloth; Mrs. Foulds, plaques; Mrs. Roberts, bread-board, knife, etc.