Burnley

Sunday’s Obituary – Timothy Eglin (1902-1913)

Timothy Eglin is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Thomas William Eglin and Margaret Ann Bancroft. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson, my 4x great grandparents.

Timothy was the fifth of ten children and his birth is registered in the first quarter of 1902. In the 1911 census the family are living at Habergham Eaves near Burnley, Lancashire.

On Christmas Eve 1913 the family were rocked by a tragic accident which ended the all too short life of Timothy. Details of the inquest are reported in the Burnley News of 27 December 1913.

Burnley News 27 Dec 1913.png

BOY’S FATAL FALL – The story of how Timothy Eglin, an eleven-year-old boy met an untimely end at Cliviger, was told at an inquest conducted by the Acting Coroner, Mr D N Haslewood, on Friday morning, at Habergham Farm, Habergham Eaves, Cliviger. Thomas William Eglin, the father, gave evidence of identification, and Mary Eglin, deceased’s four-year-old sister, said her brother had been swinging in the washhouse on Wednesday afternoon, on a rope, which was fastened at one end to the ceiling, and at the other end to the wringing machine. Whilst he was swinging, the machine fell over on her brother’s head. Alice Eglin, an older sister, told of hearing a noise coming from the direction of the washhouse, at 3 o’clock on Wednesday afternoon, and on going there she found the deceased with the top part of the machine resting on his head on the floor. With the assistance of Albert Halstead, she lifted her brother up, and Halstead carried him home. Dr. Hodgson, of Burnley, was sent for, and on arrival he found the boy dead, with the back of his head crushed in, and a cut on his forehead. A verdict of “Accidental death” was returned.

Thomas and Margaret had already experienced the loss of another child when their first born, Robert Watson, died in infancy, less than three months old in 1895.

 

Mystery Monday – Martha Blackburn (nee Stowell)

Mystery Monday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

Closely related to Madness Monday only these missing ancestors might not cause madness! Mystery Monday is where you can post about mystery ancestors or mystery records – anything in your genealogy and family history research which is currently unsolved. This is a great way to get your fellow genealogy bloggers to lend their eyes to what you’ve found so far and possibly help solve the mystery.

Martha Stowell is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. Her parents are Thomas Stowell and Ann Wroe. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

Martha was born on 23 July 1867. She was baptised on 18 August 1867 at Holy Trinity Church, Habergham Eaves, Burnley, Lancashire.

I have Martha in the 1871 and 1881 census returns. I then have a marriage for Martha to Robert Blackburn on 17 May 1884 at St Mary of the Assumption, Burnley, Lancashire. Details of this are from the Online Parish Clerks for the County of Lancashire Project

And then…..the trail goes cold.

I can’t find Martha on any later census or on the 1939 Register. Neither can I find her in the travel and immigration records online.

I know she was still alive in 1931. Her sister, Margaret Ann Gerrey died that year. Here is a link to my Sunday’s Obituary post. You will see among the floral tributes is one from “sister Martha and family”.

So Martha remains a MYSTERY!!

However I am not the only one interested in the whereabouts of Martha Blackbun (formerly Stowell).

Below is a notice from the Burnley Express of 24 April 1942.

Burnley Express 29 April 1942.png

Re MARTHA BLACKBURN
(formerly STOWELL)

INFORMATION is desired respecting the above named who was the wife of Robert Blackburn and who in 1886 resided at 252, Cog Lane, Habergham Eaves near Burnley and later is believed to have resided in Haslingden and Earby. Any person who can give information as to her present whereabouts or (if dead) the date and place of her death is requested to communicate with

SPRAKE & RANSON
Solicitors
19, Union Street, Accrington
Tel. No. 2226

Hmm should I get in touch and see if they can help me after all this time……maybe not.

Black Sheep Sunday – George Astin (1835-1867)

Black Sheep Sunday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Black Sheep Sunday simply create a post with the main focus being an ancestor with a “shaded past.”

George Astin is my 2nd great grand uncle – brother of my 2x great grandmother Ann Astin. He was born in Burnley, Lancashire, about 1835 to parents Robert Astin and Nancy Dyson, my 3x great grandparents.

George died at the young age of 32 and was buried on 5 November 1867 in Burnley Cemetery.

Trawling the newspaper archives I came across the following article in the Burnley Advertiser of 7 October 1865.

Burnley Advertiser 7 October 1865 - George Astin.png

A REBELLIOUS SON – George Astin, who did not appear, was summoned for an assault upon his father, Robert Astin. The complainant said that on the Wednesday before, his son struck him twice, once on the shoulder and once on the body. The assault was in Gas Street, and the father was struck because he would not let his son break the window out. They had had a good deal of trouble with him the last three years. He kept leaving his work and going drinking. He was not drunk when he struck the blows, but he had had some drink. Complainant wanted protection from him. Fined 10s and costs; in default to be committed to prison for one month, with hard labour.

I can’t help wonder what was the cause of George’s rebellious behaviour.

Sadly, two years later he was dead and buried. Did Robert and George ever mend their relationship?

Sunday’s Obituary – Margaret Ann Gerrey (nee Stowell) 1871-1931

Sunday’s Obituary is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Sunday’s Obituary, post obituaries along with other information about that person.

Margaret Ann Stowell is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. Her parents are Thomas Stowell and Ann Wroe. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

Margaret was born in 1871 – her birth is registered in the September quarter in Burnley, Lancashire.

I have Margaret in the 1881, 1891, 1901 and 1911 census returns. Her occupation after leaving school was as a “cotton weaver”.

On the 16 May 1891 Margaret married John Gerrey at Holy Trinity church, Habergham Eaves near Burnley. The witnesses at the marriage were Margaret’s sister and brother in law, Mary and Richard Brotherton. John Gerrey was from Cornwall and by 1911, together with their daughter May, the family had moved over 350 miles to live in St Austell, Cornwall.

John died in 1927 at the age of 60.

I haven’t been able to find any information about the daughter May – she appears in the 1911 census but as yet I haven’t found a birth record or a marriage or a death record.

Just recently I came across the following obituary notice for Margaret in the Burnley Express of 19 September 1931.

Burnley Express 19 September 1931LATE MRS MARGARET ANN GERREY – Last Thursday the funeral took place from the home of her sister, 54 Albion Street, of the late Mrs Margaret Ann Gerrey. Mrs Gerrey was a native of Burnley, and had resided in the Top o’ t’ Town district prior to her departure to Cornwall, where she resided for 24 years. Her late husband will be remembered by many as an employee at Burnley Bank Top Station. Mrs Gerrey was for many years connected with St John’s Church, Gannow. The Rev F Jones, of St Matthew’s, offered prayers at the home prior to the cortege leaving for the Burnley Cemetery. The mourners were:- Mr and Mrs Brotherton, Mr and Mrs Byrne, Mr and Mrs Sharples, Mrs Skinner, Mrs Halsall, Mr and Miss Roberts, and Mrs Black. Floral tributes were sent by:- Sorrowing sister and Dick; sister Martha and family; nieces Lily, May and Mary; Ivy and Stewart; Arthur and Lena; Annie, Jim and children; Edna, Jack and baby; Mr and Mrs Ogden and family; Lucy and Georgina; Mr and Mrs Ingham and Fanny; Mr and Mrs Swindlehurst; Mrs Black; and Lily and Fred. The Co-operative Society, Ltd carried out the arrangements.

Tuesday’s Tip – Probate Records

Tuesday’s Tip is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

What advice would you give to another genealogist or family historian, especially someone just starting out? Remember when you were new to genealogy? Wasn’t it great to find tips and tricks that worked for others?

Albert Edward Dawson is my 4th cousin 1x removed. His mother was Mary Dawson. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson, my 4x great grandparents.

As far as I can establish there was nothing significant or exceptional about Albert’s life. He was born on 12 January 1906 in Barrowford, Lancashire. In the 1911 census Albert is living at 42 Gordon Street, Colne, Lancashire, with his mother Mary, his widowed grandmother Ann Dawson (nee Hargreaves) and his uncle James (Mary’s brother).

I have a marriage for Albert sometime in the June quarter of 1931 in Burnley, Lancashire, to Doris Ainsworth.

In the 1939 Register Albert and Doris are living at 3 Park Hill, Barrowford, Lancashire. They are both described as a “cotton weaver.”

I haven’t been able to find a death record for Doris. It is possible that she remarried at some point. But I can’t find a matching record for a marriage either – so she remains a mystery for now.

However I have found a death for Albert Edward Dawson in Staincliffe, West Yorkshire, in the December quarter of 1972.

Straightforward on the face of it. However, my tip is to always check the probate records to see if there is a will. This can sometimes be very useful – you might find information about other relatives who are beneficiaries of the will; you might find that your relative died in a particular hospital or at home; you might find details of their last address; you should find some information about the value of the estate; and you might find other interesting information.

Which is precisely what happened in the case of Albert Edward Dawson. Below is the entry from the England & Wales National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations) from www.ancestry.co.uk

albert-edward-dawson-probate

You will see that I now have the last known address of Albert at the time of his death – 1 Park Lane Cottages, Cowling, Keighley. Also that he was last known to be alive on 23 October 1972 and his dead body was found on 30 October 1972.

I don’t know the circumstances of his death or where his body was found.

There doesn’t appear to be anything in the newspaper archives at www.findmypast.co.uk. I have been to the library at Skipton to search their newspaper archives because some of the local papers are not included in the Find My Past records.

So far I haven’t been able to find any report of Albert going missing or of his dead body being found in suspicious circumstances or otherwise.

However I only know that there is something unusual about his death because of the information available from the probate records. So remember that the probate records can be a valuable genealogy resource.

Black Sheep Sunday – John Robert Stowell (1901-1966)

Black Sheep Sunday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers to help them post content on their sites.

To participate in Black Sheep Sunday simply create a post with the main focus being an ancestor with a “shaded past.”

John Robert Stowell is my 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Robert Alexander Stowell and Edith Annie Burns. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Astin, my 2x great grandparents.

As far as I can tell John Robert was the only child of of his parents. His birth is registered in Burnley, Lancashire.

He married Sarah Ellis sometime in the September quarter of 1926. They has no children. He then married Ellen Ainsworth in 1935, the marriage is registered in Q4. John Robert and Ellen had one son – James in 1936.

On the face of it not an ancestor I would normally write a blog post about…until I found the following newspaper article from the Lancashire Evening News of 11 December 1929.

Lancashire Evening News - 11 Dec 1929.png

If ever I needed more information from a newspaper article this is it. What did he do that required a sentence of three months in prison with hard labour. The article is woefully short on some vital details.

I can find Ellen and James in the 1939 Register but there is no sign of John Robert. So perhaps there is more to John Robert Stowell than I first thought!