Burnley

Strictly Ballroom – Arthur & Mary Louisa Cambage

Mary Louisa Myers is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are Tom Myers and Mary Ellen Procter. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane – my 3x great grandparents.

Mary Louisa was born on 2 May 1899 in Burnley, Lancashire. Sometime in the September quarter of 1922 she married Arthur C Cambage in Burnley.

Now no one could ever accuse me of being able to dance – I have two left feet and no sense of rhythm or coordination whatsoever.

I’m very glad to say that was not the case for Arthur and Mary Cambage – in fact you could say they were the Fred and Ginger of their day in Britain.

According to the newspaper article below Arthur was “the outstanding personality in dancing, not only locally but in many parts of the country, for years”. Either by himself or with Mary he gave dancing demonstrations and was also in demand as a judge at both amateur and professional competitions.

In the 1939 Register Arthur and Mary lived at 19 Broadway, Fleetwood, Lancashire. Arthur was employed by Fleetwood Corporation as Entertainments Manager. Before moving to Fleetwood Arthur had been organising manager at the Nelson Entertainments Company.

The Nelson Leader of 24 January 1936 reported on Arthur and Mary’s impending move to Fleetwood.

Arthur Cambage - Nelson Leader 24 January 1936.png

LEAVING NELSON

MR A C CAMBAGE SECURES IMPORTANT POSITION

MANAGER AT FLEETWOOD’S NEW HALL

Scores of friends and literally thousands of people who know him by sight if not by name will be interested to know that Mr Arthur C Cambage, the organising manager for the Nelson Entertainments Company, Imperial Ballroom, is leaving Nelson shortly to take up the position of manager of the new Marine Hall and sun parlour and colonnades at Fleetwood.
Mr Cambage has been at the Imperial for the last six years, and for several years before was the manager of the Empress Ballroom, Burnley. Undoubtedly Mr Cambage has been the outstanding personality in dancing, not only locally but in many parts of the country, for years. He alone, or accompanied by his wife, has given demonstrations of dancing in London and other big cities, and at one time he was also in great demand as an adjudicator at both amateur and professional dancing competitions. Mr Cambage has also been well-known as a teacher of dancing, a profession which his father and mother were expert in for many years, and his departure from this district will bring an end to the Cambage family’s connection with local entertainments since 1902.
Mrs Arthur Cambage’s departure from the district will also be felt by many organisations in which she has been interested, and particularly the Burnley Garrick Club. She has played many leading roles for the club in productions privately and at the Victoria Theatre, Burnley, and about three years ago she was invited by Col. Robert Loraine to go to London to take part in his productions. Mrs Cambage has also appeared on the concert platform as a pianist, and her fame as a ballroom dancing expert is also well-known.
The position Mr Cambage has secured is regarded as one of the plums of the profession. The Marine Hall at Fleetwood was only opened in November last, and is one of the finest of its kind in the country, the ballroom being most modern and up-tp-date.
Mr and Mrs Cambage will take with them the good wishes of everyone who know them.

So as well as being an extremely accomplished dancer Mary Louisa played the piano and was a leading actress.

Arthur and Mary Louisa spent about eight years in Fleetwood before Arthur took over as manager of the Excel Hotel in Garstang, Lancashire.

Away from the world of entertainment Arthur served in the Army in WW1 for over three years, mostly in France and Belgium. During WW2 he joined the Home Guard in Fleetwood as a private in May 1940, eventually rising to Major and Commanding Officer in May 1944.

Arthur and Mary Louisa both died in 1966.

Black Sheep Sunday – Frederick Stephen Myers

Frederick Stephen Myers is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Tom Myers and Mary Ellen Procter. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane – my 3x great grandparents.

Frederick was born on 24 April 1893 in Burnley, Lancashire.

In the 1911 census Frederick is living at 4 Forrest Street, Nelson, Lancashire and working as a cotton weaver. At some point in the next eleven years Frederick went into partnership with George Mitchell and Daniel Roscoe working as electricians under the name of George Mitchell &Co.

On 2 February 1922 that partnership was dissolved but Frederick and George continued in business under the same name. Just over five years later the pair found themselves in court over National Insurance Contributions failures. The Burnley News of Saturday 19 March 1927 ran the following story (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Frederick Stephen Myers - Burnley News 10 March 1927.png

UNSTAMPED CARDS

Burnley Firm and Insurance Contributions

BENCH AND A BAD CASE

At Burnley Police Court, on Wednesday, George Mitchell, 4 Forrest Street, Nelson, and Frederick Stephen Myers, 43 Clevelands Road, Burnley, trading as G. Mitchell and Co., electrical and mechanical engineers, Burnley, pleaded guilty to two breaches of the Unemployment Insurance Acts, 1920 to 1925, and three breaches of the National Health Insurance Act, 1924.
Mr. J. H. Sinkinson, prosecuting, said the defendants had three employees, Henry Hargreaves, Harold Barrett and Cecil Ibbotson, an apprentice, to whose unemployment and health insurance cards they had failed to affix stamps. In the case of Hargreaves defendants failed to pay health insurance and pensions contributions for 20 weeks at 1s. 6d. a week, a total of £1 10s. No contribution was made for the whole of the last half year up to the time of the visit in November of an official of the Ministry.
Regarding unemployment insurance contributions, the defendants during the period 1925-26, failed to make, in respect of Hargreaves, sixteen contribution at 1s. 3d. weekly, and during the current period had failed to pay for twenty weeks, a total of £2 5s. In the case of Barrett twenty health insurance payments, representing £1 10s., and twenty-four unemployment insurance payments representing another £1 10s. were not made. With reference to Ibbotson, nineteen health insurance contributions were not paid – £1 8s. 6d. in all – and they could have taken proceedings in that case in respect of non-payment of unemployment insurance. The total amount of arrears for which defendants were summoned was £8 3s 6d.
“I don’t know how your worships look on these cases.” said Mr. Sinkinson, “but to me they appear as very serious matters.” Proceedings had been taken in that Court previously, and the Bench had expressed very strongly their feelings concerning the neglect of employers who failed to affix the required stamps. The newspapers, recognising the importance of such cases had given most extensive reports of them which must have been read by defendants, who could hardly plead that they knew nothing about it. Personally, he could hardly find words sometimes to describe employers who thus would deliberately jeopardise the rights of working men and women to the health insurance, unemployment insurance, and pensions provided for them by the State. Often officials had great difficulty in securing benefits for claimants because of the neglect of employers to affix stamps. In that case each defendant had rendered himself liable to a £10 fine in each case. Of the two he was afraid that Myers was the most to blame, for he had undertaken the clerical work of the firm. A bad feature too, was that Myers had taken 1s. 6d. a week from the wages of his employees as their contributions to health and unemployment stamps, or 2d. more than he was entitled to deduct.
Mitchell said that he did not know that the cards had not been stamped.
Myers said at the time the cards should have been filled up he was off ill for a fortnight. He could not find Hargreaves’s card when he came back. He offered to stamp them, but they were taken away. He was told by a cashier at a local engineering shop that 1s. 6d. a week should be deducted from wages, and since he had been informed that it was 1s. 4d. he had refunded the difference. On account of Hargreaves’ card having been lost he kept putting off the stamping of the cards.
The Mayor said the magistrates regarded the case as a bad one. Defendants would be required to pay the arrears and each would be fined 10s. including costs in each case, and special costs, a total of £13 7s. 6d.

Sunday’s Obituary – John Espley (1869-1945)

John Espley is my wife’s 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Joseph Booth Espley and Christiana Boyle. Their common ancestor is Martha Espley – my wife’s 2x great grandmother.

John was born on 5 May 1869 in Macclesfield, Cheshire.

In the 1891 census John was with his uncle & aunt Frederick Espley and Frances Espley in Biddulph, Staffordshire. He was working as an iron turner. By the time of the following census in 1901 John was living in Burnley, Lancashire working as a builders labourer.

On 7 December 1901 John married Sarah Booth at St Matthew the Apostle church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

Sarah was a young widow of 25. Her maiden name was Sarah Baines Turner. She had married Samuel Booth in the first quarter of 1897 in Burnley. Samuel died three years later. This left Sarah on her own with three children under three years old – Betty, Jane and Samuel.

By the time of the 1911 census John and Sarah had six children of their own but sadly two died in infancy. By now John was working in the water department of the Burnley Borough Council.

John was a conscientious employee for the water department and eventually retired from there in 1934. The Burnley Express of Saturday 5 May 1934 reported on his retirement (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

John Espley - Burnley Express 5 May 1934.png

THIRTY-THREE YEARS WITH WATER DEPARTMENT

After completing 33 years service with the Burnley Corporation Water Department, Mr. John Espley, of 14 Hawk Street, enters into a well-earned retirement today. Mr. Espley, who is 65 years of age, has served under three managers, and for over 20 years has been a foreman with the department.
He holds the proud record of never having been late for 32 years. One day, when he had been with the department about 12 months, he arrived five minutes late and was sent home for three days. He has never been late since! Mr. Espley is interested in gardening, with which he occupies much of his spare time.

John’s retirement lasted for eleven years before he died on 4 June 1945. He was buried three days later in Burnley cemetery.

The Burnley Express reported on his death on Saturday 9 June 1945.

John Espley - Burnley Express 9 June 1945.png

MR. JOHN ESPLEY

The death of Mr. John Espley (76) took place at his home, 81 Albert Street, Burnley, on Monday, after a short illness. Mr. Espley, a well-known Fulledge resident, was employed by the Burnley Corporation Water Department for about 33 years, being a foreman for about 20 years. He retired about 11 years ago. The funeral took place at the Burnley Cemetery on Thursday, preceded by a service in the Latter Day Saints’ Chapel, Rosegrove, with which he was connected. Elder John R. Moore and Elder W. Duckworth officiated. Arrangements: Mr. Joseph Harling, 29 Yorkshire Street.

Sarah lived for a further 13 months – she was buried on 29 July 1946 in Burnley Cemetery.

Wedding Wednesday -Ernest Welch and Bertha Easton

Bertha Easton is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are Robert Fraser Easton and Christiana Astin. Our common ancestors are Robert Astin and Nancy Dyson – my 3x great grandparents.

Bertha was born on 25 August 1892 – her birth is registered in Burnley, Lancashire.

On 9 October 1922 Bertha married Ernest Welch at the Bethesda Congregational Church in Burnley. Details of the wedding were announced in the Burnley News on 14 October 1922 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Bertha Easton & Ernest Welch - Burnley News 14 October 1922.png

BURNLEY WEDDINGS

WELCH – EASTON

An interesting wedding took place at Bethesda Congregational Church on Monday last, the contracting parties being Mr Ernest Welch, only son of Mrs Welch, and the late Mr C Welch, of Waterloo Road, and Miss Bertha Easton, eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs R F Easton, of 16 Lansdowne Street. The ceremony was performed by the Rev J W Ffoulkes.
The bride was daintily attired in saxe-blue crepe de chine, and wore a pan velvet hat to match. She carried a bouquet of lilies and white chrysanthemums. She was attended by her sister, Miss Dorothy Easton, who carried a bouquet of white and bronze chrysanthemums. The bride’s brother, Mr Edward Easton, performed the duties of best man.
After the ceremony lunch was served at the home of the bride’s parents, and later the newly married couple left for Morecambe, where the honeymoon is being spent.

Sunday’s Obituary – Gordon Fitzgerald (1928-1938)

Gordon Fitzgerald is my wife’s 3rd cousin. His parents are William Edward Fitzgerald and Emily Wilkinson. Their common ancestor is Martha Espley – my wife’s 2x great grandmother.

Gordon was born in Burnley, Lancashire. His birth is registered in the June quarter of 1928. At some point in the mid to late 1930’s the family moved to Warwickshire. In the 1939 Register they are living at Perrywood Road, Birmingham.

Gordon does not appear in the 1939 Register – he died in a tragic accident the previous year. The following article is from the Midland Daily Telegraph of 7 December 1938 (image taken from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Gordon Fitzgerald - Midland Daily Telegraph 7 December 1938.png

BOY’S BATHROOM PRANK

Hanged After Reading Strip Cartoon

At an inquest, in Birmingham, today, on a ten-years-old boy, who was found hanging in the bathroom, the theory that he was experimenting after seeing a strip cartoon in a boys’ periodical was put forward. The boy was Gordon Fitzgerald, of Perry Wood Road, Great Barr, Birmingham.
A magazine, which the father said his boy read occasionally, was produced in court. It contained a strip cartoon showing one of the characters with a lasso drawn tightly round his neck.
An illustration of how the string was fastened round the boy’s neck proved that it could not have got there by accident.
Mr Fitzgerald said that the boy must have put his head into the loop, deliberately leaving a very narrow margin of safety, and, when he tried to draw his head out of it, pulled the loop tight and increased the pressure around his neck.
Returning a verdict of “Death from misadventure,” the Coroner (Dr W H Davison) said that there was nothing suspicious about the case. The boy’s death was the result of a childish prank, probably stimulated by something he had read.

Perhaps this is a 1930’s example of what we regularly refer to today as the negative and dangerous influence of social media on young children.

Wedding Wednesday – Harold Moor and Edna Proudfoot

Edna Proudfoot is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Arthur Proudfoot and Ellen Ann Myers. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane, my 3x great grandparents.

Edna was born on 26 October 1910 in Burnley, Lancashire.

On 25 April 1933 Edna married Harold Moor at St. Paul’s Church, Nelson, Lancashire – a report of the wedding was published in the Burnley Express the following day.

Harold Moor & Edna Proudfoot wedding.png

Considerable interest was evinced in a pretty wedding which took place yesterday afternoon, in St Paul’s Church, Nelson. The contracting parties were Mr Harold Moor, youngest son of Mr Harold Moor, of 1 Bank Hall Terrace, Burnley, a member of the firm of Messrs T and J Moor, wholesale fruiterers, of Nelson, and Miss Edna Proudfoot, eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs Proudfoot, of 146 Hibson Road, Nelson. The ceremony was performed, in the presence of a large congregation, by the Rev W M V Gregory.

The bride, who was given away by her father, was prettily attired in a gown of fine lace over crepe suede trimmed in silk velvet. She wore a veil with a wreath of orange blossom and carried a bouquet of lilac. The bridesmaids were Miss Mary Proudfoot, Miss Jean Proudfoot and Miss Nancy Proudfoot (sisters of the bride), and Miss Eleanor Dyson (friend of the bride). They were dressed in Parma violet crapple crepe marocain, with chenille berets to tone. Their bouquets were composed of anemones. The bride’s mother wore a brown and du Barry crapple crepe marocain, and Mrs E A Smalley, of Accrington, sister of the bridegroom, was attired in nigger brown floral crepe de Chine. Both had bouquets of tea roses.

The duties of best man were discharged by Mr A Veevers, friend of the bridegroom, and Mr T Greenwood (friend of the bridegroom) and Mr E A Smalley, of Accrington (brother-in-law of the bridegroom), officiated as groomsmen. After the ceremony a reception was held at Oddie’s Cafe, Scotland Road, Nelson.

The bridegroom is well known in local amateur football, playing centre-forward for the Burnley Grammar School Old Boys, of which team the best man is the captain.

The bride’s gift to the bridegroom was a gold wristlet watch, and the bridegroom’s gift to the bride was a pearl necklace. Diamante brilliant clips were presented by the bridegroom to the bridesmaids. Among the presents was a case of fish eaters and servers from the staff of Messrs T and J Moor.

The honeymoon is being spent touring in the South.

Sunday’s Obituary – George Dacre Crewdson (1890-1943)

Clara Shackleton is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are James Shackleton and Mary Elizabeth Haworth. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane – my 3x great grandparents.

Clara was born on 20 April 1900 and her birth was registered in Burnley, Lancashire.

On 30 August 1922 Clara married George Dacre Crewdson at Holy Trinity Church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

George was born on 8 June 1890 – his birth was also registered in Burnley.

When the 1939 Register was taken on 29 September 1939 George and Clara were living at 7 Church Street, Briercliffe, Burnley. George was employed as a “cotton loom overlooker” and Clara’s occupation was described as “unpaid domestic duties”. Also living with them were two children – Eveline and James. Their first daughter, Irene, was born in 1923 but sadly died the same year.

Within three and half years Clara would be left a widow with two children following the death of George at the age of 52.

The Nelson Leader of 29 January 1943 reported on George’s death as a result of what at first appears to be an innocuous incident at work.

George Daker Crewdson - Nelson Leader 29 January 1943.png

Fatal Pin-prick

OVERLOOKER’S DEATH FROM SEPTICAEMIA

A pin-prick sustained while handling pickers at Primrose Mill, Harle Syke, was held responsible for the death of George Dacre Crewdson (51), 7 Church Street, Briercliffe, a power loom overlooker employed by the South View Manufacturing Company, when the East Lancashire Coroner (Mr F Rowland) conducted an inquest at Brierfield Town Hall on Wednesday morning.
The widow was represented by Mr Riley; Mr Howarth appeared on behalf of the employers, and Miss Blackburn, H M Inspector of Factories, was also present.
The widow, Mrs Clara Crewdson, said her husband was a healthy man and never had a serious illness. During the evening of Friday January 8th, he complained that the first finger on his right hand was sore, and said he had got something in it at his work, but he did not say when. He explained that he was putting some pickers on and caught his finger on one of these, but whether it was a piece of hide or not which had entered the finger he did not know. Whatever it was, it had burnt in owing to the picker being hot. He bathed the finger in hot water and applied a poultice, but despite further treatment, the infection became worse. He followed his employment until 5.30pm on Wednesday, January 13th, and on the 15th consulted Dr Lamberti, who treated the injury and ordered her husband to go to Victoria Hospital the following day. He paid two visits to the hospital, and ought to have gone there again on the 18th, but he was too ill to do so. Dr Lamberti, and later Dr Munroe, visited him frequently, and on the 21st a surgeon was called in. Despite this attention, however, her husband died last Saturday.
Sam Riley, another overlooker employed at Primrose Mill, said he was in the storeroom during the afternoon of January 11th, and in the course of a conversation Crewdson said he had injured the first finger of his right hand, at the same time holding up the bandaged finger, which was afterwards seen by other employees.
Dr Lamberti said the finger was septic when Crewdson first consulted him on January 15th. It was incised at the hospital, but the man’s condition grew worse, and his death on the 23rd was the result of septicaemia. Witness added that when he first examined the finger he found a small pin-prick between the first and second joints.
Witness agreed with Mr Riley that this could have been caused by a splinter which entered the finger as the man’s hand slid over the picker.
Dr Palin, Police Surgeon for the Brierfield district, said the post-mortem examination revealed the cause of death to be septic pneumonia due to infection from the finger. As the finger was very swollen the point of entry had passed away.
Witness agreed with Mr Riley that the medical history from January 8th onwards was consistent with the man having met with such an injury.
The Coroner said there had been great doubt as to the continuity between the alleged injury and the man’s death, but that had now been cleared away. He was quite satisfied that Crewdson did injure his finger in the way he had said at his work. Evidently it was just a pin-prick, and the man probably did not think at first that it was serious; nevertheless, he and his wife applied the necessary treatment from the outset. The man, being a conscientious workman, continued to follow his employment until he consulted the doctor on the 15th, but by that time septicaemia had got hold, and this caused his death. There was a chain of cause and effect between the injury and the man’s death, therefore the proper verdict was one of “Accidental death”. The Coroner said he did not doubt that the injury was caused while the man was following his employment, and deeply sympathised with the widow.
Mr Howarth expressed the regret of the employers, who recognised that they had lost a conscientious workman, and Mr Riley suitably replied on behalf of the widow.

Clara remarried to Smith Bannister sometime in the fourth quarter of 1946. She passed away in 1966 in Blackpool, Lancashire.