Burnley

Wedding Wednesday – Harold Moor and Edna Proudfoot

Edna Proudfoot is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Arthur Proudfoot and Ellen Ann Myers. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane, my 3x great grandparents.

Edna was born on 26 October 1910 in Burnley, Lancashire.

On 25 April 1933 Edna married Harold Moor at St. Paul’s Church, Nelson, Lancashire – a report of the wedding was published in the Burnley Express the following day.

Harold Moor & Edna Proudfoot wedding.png

Considerable interest was evinced in a pretty wedding which took place yesterday afternoon, in St Paul’s Church, Nelson. The contracting parties were Mr Harold Moor, youngest son of Mr Harold Moor, of 1 Bank Hall Terrace, Burnley, a member of the firm of Messrs T and J Moor, wholesale fruiterers, of Nelson, and Miss Edna Proudfoot, eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs Proudfoot, of 146 Hibson Road, Nelson. The ceremony was performed, in the presence of a large congregation, by the Rev W M V Gregory.

The bride, who was given away by her father, was prettily attired in a gown of fine lace over crepe suede trimmed in silk velvet. She wore a veil with a wreath of orange blossom and carried a bouquet of lilac. The bridesmaids were Miss Mary Proudfoot, Miss Jean Proudfoot and Miss Nancy Proudfoot (sisters of the bride), and Miss Eleanor Dyson (friend of the bride). They were dressed in Parma violet crapple crepe marocain, with chenille berets to tone. Their bouquets were composed of anemones. The bride’s mother wore a brown and du Barry crapple crepe marocain, and Mrs E A Smalley, of Accrington, sister of the bridegroom, was attired in nigger brown floral crepe de Chine. Both had bouquets of tea roses.

The duties of best man were discharged by Mr A Veevers, friend of the bridegroom, and Mr T Greenwood (friend of the bridegroom) and Mr E A Smalley, of Accrington (brother-in-law of the bridegroom), officiated as groomsmen. After the ceremony a reception was held at Oddie’s Cafe, Scotland Road, Nelson.

The bridegroom is well known in local amateur football, playing centre-forward for the Burnley Grammar School Old Boys, of which team the best man is the captain.

The bride’s gift to the bridegroom was a gold wristlet watch, and the bridegroom’s gift to the bride was a pearl necklace. Diamante brilliant clips were presented by the bridegroom to the bridesmaids. Among the presents was a case of fish eaters and servers from the staff of Messrs T and J Moor.

The honeymoon is being spent touring in the South.

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Sunday’s Obituary – George Dacre Crewdson (1890-1943)

Clara Shackleton is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are James Shackleton and Mary Elizabeth Haworth. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane – my 3x great grandparents.

Clara was born on 20 April 1900 and her birth was registered in Burnley, Lancashire.

On 30 August 1922 Clara married George Dacre Crewdson at Holy Trinity Church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

George was born on 8 June 1890 – his birth was also registered in Burnley.

When the 1939 Register was taken on 29 September 1939 George and Clara were living at 7 Church Street, Briercliffe, Burnley. George was employed as a “cotton loom overlooker” and Clara’s occupation was described as “unpaid domestic duties”. Also living with them were two children – Eveline and James. Their first daughter, Irene, was born in 1923 but sadly died the same year.

Within three and half years Clara would be left a widow with two children following the death of George at the age of 52.

The Nelson Leader of 29 January 1943 reported on George’s death as a result of what at first appears to be an innocuous incident at work.

George Daker Crewdson - Nelson Leader 29 January 1943.png

Fatal Pin-prick

OVERLOOKER’S DEATH FROM SEPTICAEMIA

A pin-prick sustained while handling pickers at Primrose Mill, Harle Syke, was held responsible for the death of George Dacre Crewdson (51), 7 Church Street, Briercliffe, a power loom overlooker employed by the South View Manufacturing Company, when the East Lancashire Coroner (Mr F Rowland) conducted an inquest at Brierfield Town Hall on Wednesday morning.
The widow was represented by Mr Riley; Mr Howarth appeared on behalf of the employers, and Miss Blackburn, H M Inspector of Factories, was also present.
The widow, Mrs Clara Crewdson, said her husband was a healthy man and never had a serious illness. During the evening of Friday January 8th, he complained that the first finger on his right hand was sore, and said he had got something in it at his work, but he did not say when. He explained that he was putting some pickers on and caught his finger on one of these, but whether it was a piece of hide or not which had entered the finger he did not know. Whatever it was, it had burnt in owing to the picker being hot. He bathed the finger in hot water and applied a poultice, but despite further treatment, the infection became worse. He followed his employment until 5.30pm on Wednesday, January 13th, and on the 15th consulted Dr Lamberti, who treated the injury and ordered her husband to go to Victoria Hospital the following day. He paid two visits to the hospital, and ought to have gone there again on the 18th, but he was too ill to do so. Dr Lamberti, and later Dr Munroe, visited him frequently, and on the 21st a surgeon was called in. Despite this attention, however, her husband died last Saturday.
Sam Riley, another overlooker employed at Primrose Mill, said he was in the storeroom during the afternoon of January 11th, and in the course of a conversation Crewdson said he had injured the first finger of his right hand, at the same time holding up the bandaged finger, which was afterwards seen by other employees.
Dr Lamberti said the finger was septic when Crewdson first consulted him on January 15th. It was incised at the hospital, but the man’s condition grew worse, and his death on the 23rd was the result of septicaemia. Witness added that when he first examined the finger he found a small pin-prick between the first and second joints.
Witness agreed with Mr Riley that this could have been caused by a splinter which entered the finger as the man’s hand slid over the picker.
Dr Palin, Police Surgeon for the Brierfield district, said the post-mortem examination revealed the cause of death to be septic pneumonia due to infection from the finger. As the finger was very swollen the point of entry had passed away.
Witness agreed with Mr Riley that the medical history from January 8th onwards was consistent with the man having met with such an injury.
The Coroner said there had been great doubt as to the continuity between the alleged injury and the man’s death, but that had now been cleared away. He was quite satisfied that Crewdson did injure his finger in the way he had said at his work. Evidently it was just a pin-prick, and the man probably did not think at first that it was serious; nevertheless, he and his wife applied the necessary treatment from the outset. The man, being a conscientious workman, continued to follow his employment until he consulted the doctor on the 15th, but by that time septicaemia had got hold, and this caused his death. There was a chain of cause and effect between the injury and the man’s death, therefore the proper verdict was one of “Accidental death”. The Coroner said he did not doubt that the injury was caused while the man was following his employment, and deeply sympathised with the widow.
Mr Howarth expressed the regret of the employers, who recognised that they had lost a conscientious workman, and Mr Riley suitably replied on behalf of the widow.

Clara remarried to Smith Bannister sometime in the fourth quarter of 1946. She passed away in 1966 in Blackpool, Lancashire.

Black Sheep Sunday – James Bowes (1888-1973)

James Bowes is my 3rd cousin 2x removed.

James was born on 27 December 1888 in Burnley, Lancashire, to parents James Bowes and Ada Welsh. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

James married Gerty Roberts sometime in the March quarter of 1915.

In 1939, at the outbreak of World War Two James and Gerty were living at Clifton Street, Nelson, Lancashire.

It is common practice during wartime for a blackout to be introduced. People who failed to keep their homes or premises in darkness were liable to stringent legal penalties.

On 6 June 1941 the Nelson Leader carried a report that James was in breach of the lighting regulations.

James Bowes - Nelson Leader 6 June 1941.png

Black-Out Offence

For a breach of the lighting regulations, James Bowes (52), 18 Clifton Street, Nelson, was fined 10s, by the local magistrates on Saturday. P.W.R. Jolly said he was in Chapel Street at 11.50pm on Saturday, May 17th, when he saw a bright beam of light shining from the back kitchen window of defendant’s home. He found that the window was screened only by light brown curtains, and these were about three inches apart down the centre. Defendant said it was an oversight, he had blacked-out the front of the house, and forgotten to draw the dark blind in the kitchen.

Sunday’s Obituary – Tom Myers (1862-1945)

Tom Myers is the husband of my 1st cousin 3x removed, Mary Ellen Procter. Mary’s parents are William Procter and Nancy Stowell. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

Tom was born about 1862 in Burnley, Lancashire – his birth is registered in the June quarter of that year.

Tom and Mary Ellen were married on 22 April 1884 at St. Peter’s church in Burnley. They had at least seven children between 1885 and 1904.

In the census returns for 1891, 1901 and 1911 Tom’s occupation is described as “barber” or “hairdresser and tobacconist”.

Sadly Mary Ellen died at the relatively young age of 44 early in 1908.

Tom lived for another 37 years passing away on 30 August 1945. The following notice was published in the Burnley Express on 5 September 1945.

Tom Myers - Burnley Express 5 Sep 1945.png

Mr TOM MYERS

Mt Tom Myers, last of four brothers who did so much for the musical life of Burnley, was laid to rest in Burnley Cemetery on Monday. Mr Myers, who was 83, had been residing for the past few years at 294, Scotland Road, Nelson. He was a brother of the late Mr Fred Myers, who was one of the founders and conductors of the old Philharmonic Orchestra in Burnley which afterwards became the nucleus of the Municipal Orchestra.

Sunday’s Obituary – James Bowes (1861-1955)

James Bowes is the husband of my 2nd cousin 3x removed Ada Welsh.

James was born on 23 December 1861 in Burnley, Lancashire. he married Ada at Holy Trinity church, Habergham eaves, Lancashire on 25 September 1886.

Over the next twenty one years James and Ada had eleven children.

In the census returns for 1891, 1901 and 1911 James was described as a “cotton beamer”.

James died on 12 February 1955 and his death was reported in the Nelson Leader on 18 February 1955.

James Bowes - Nelson Leader 18 Feb 1955.png

Mr James Bowes

In the RC Section of Nelson Cemetery, on Tuesday, the remains were interred of Mr James Bowes, 76 Southfield Street, Nelson, who died on Saturday, aged 93 years. The Rev. Fr. Hope officiated. One of the oldest blind pensioners in Nelson, Mr Bowes is survived by three daughters and two sons. Solemn Requiem Mass was celebrated in St. George’s Church by Fr. Hope prior to the interment.

There were no flowers by request.

Mass offerings:- daughters Ida, Eva, Lilly; Mrs Dee and Mr Chapman; Mrs Laycock; Mrs Corrigan; Katie Hargreaves, Bob, Eileen (Canada); S.V.P. Saint George.

Undertakers:- Nelson Co-op, Funeral service.

Sunday’s Obituary – Ada Bowes (nee Welsh) 1867-1950

Ada Welsh is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. Her parents were Patrick Welsh (or sometimes Walsh) and Charlotte Stowell. Our common ancestors were John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

Ada was born on 11 April 1867 and her birth was registered in Burnley, Lancashire. As far as I have been able to establish she was the first of at least seven children.

On the 25 September 1886, at the age of 19, Ada married James Bowes at Holy Trinity church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

James and Ada had eleven children over the next twenty one years.

In the census returns of 1891 and 1911 Ada’s occupation is given as “cotton winder”. And in the 1939 Register she is described as doing “unpaid domestic duties”.

Ada died on 16 May 1950 and her death was reported in the Nelson Leader on 26 May 1950.

Ada Bowes - Nelson Leader 26 May 1950.png

Mrs Ada Bowes

At the Nelson Cemetery, RC Section, on Friday the interment took place of Mrs Ada Bowes, 76, Southfield Street, Nelson, whose death, at the age of 83, occurred the previous Tuesday. The Rev. Father Hope officiated.

Floral tributes from:- Lily and Harry; Jim and Eva and brother Jim and Madge; Agnes Corrigan; Bobbie and Brian; Mrs Lonsdale; and others.

Mass Offerings:- Dad and Ida; S.V.P and Married Ladies, St George’s; Margaret Dee; Mrs Laycock; Mr and Mrs Chapman; Bob, Eileen and the boys (Canada); Cissie McIntyre.

Undertakers:- Helliwell Funeral Service.

Sunday’s Obituary – Dent Stowell (1882-1948)

Dent Stowell is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. I have written about Dent before, herehere and here.

Dent was born on 14 July 1882 in Burnley, Lancashire to parents Thomas Stowell and Ann Wroe. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff (my 4x great grandparents).

If you have read my previous posts you will know that Dent had an interesting life :-

  • he served in the Black Watch Regiment in South Africa in the Boer War and in France during WW1, being wounded more than once.
  • he had an unhappy first marriage but found love for a second time with Helen Gordon – however he was found guilty of bigamously marrying Helen in 1918, before finally marrying her legally in 1939.
  • he had eight children from his two marriages.
  • he lived in Canada and in the United States of America.

Dent passed away on 28 March 1948 and I recently discovered the following inquest report in the Burnley Express of 31 March 1948.

Dent Stowell - Inquest 31 March 1948.png

Man’s sudden death during night

“Death from natural causes” was the verdict recorded by the Burnley Deputy Coroner (Mr C Waddington) at an inquest on Monday on Dent Stowell (65), machine operator, of 89 Marlborough Street, who died on Sunday morning.

Mrs Helen Stowell said that her husband had served in the Boer and 1914-18 wars, and in the latter was wounded and badly gassed. His general health had not been good since 1918, but he had never had a serious illness. For the past four months he had complained of chest pains, but would not seek medical advice.

On Friday, the pains became worse, and on Saturday he said the pain felt like a lump in his chest. That evening she gave him a Seidlitz powder in warm water and, later, Indian Brandy in warm water, and they retired about 11.15pm. At 12.15am her husband got out of bed, and put the light out before returning.

Immediately he had got back into bed she heard strange noises coming from his throat, and, on putting on the light, found him struggling for breath. She helped him to sit up, but he collapsed in her arms. She ran out of the house and asked a passer-by to send for the police, who, on arrival, told her her husband had passed away.

Mr R O Davidson, consulting surgeon, said that he had conducted a post-mortem examination, and in his opinion death was due to cardiac failure, due to myocardial degeneration and coronary sclerosis.

After Dent’s death Helen moved to America to be with family who had emigrated there. She lived for another 36 years before passing away in 1984. Helen’s family brought her to England for burial alongside Dent and their son Percy in Burnley Cemetery, Lancashire.

Dent and Helen had thirty years together and I suspect could tell some tales about their experiences and adventures.