Brierfield Town Hall

Sunday’s Obituary – George Dacre Crewdson (1890-1943)

Clara Shackleton is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are James Shackleton and Mary Elizabeth Haworth. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane – my 3x great grandparents.

Clara was born on 20 April 1900 and her birth was registered in Burnley, Lancashire.

On 30 August 1922 Clara married George Dacre Crewdson at Holy Trinity Church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

George was born on 8 June 1890 – his birth was also registered in Burnley.

When the 1939 Register was taken on 29 September 1939 George and Clara were living at 7 Church Street, Briercliffe, Burnley. George was employed as a “cotton loom overlooker” and Clara’s occupation was described as “unpaid domestic duties”. Also living with them were two children – Eveline and James. Their first daughter, Irene, was born in 1923 but sadly died the same year.

Within three and half years Clara would be left a widow with two children following the death of George at the age of 52.

The Nelson Leader of 29 January 1943 reported on George’s death as a result of what at first appears to be an innocuous incident at work.

George Daker Crewdson - Nelson Leader 29 January 1943.png

Fatal Pin-prick

OVERLOOKER’S DEATH FROM SEPTICAEMIA

A pin-prick sustained while handling pickers at Primrose Mill, Harle Syke, was held responsible for the death of George Dacre Crewdson (51), 7 Church Street, Briercliffe, a power loom overlooker employed by the South View Manufacturing Company, when the East Lancashire Coroner (Mr F Rowland) conducted an inquest at Brierfield Town Hall on Wednesday morning.
The widow was represented by Mr Riley; Mr Howarth appeared on behalf of the employers, and Miss Blackburn, H M Inspector of Factories, was also present.
The widow, Mrs Clara Crewdson, said her husband was a healthy man and never had a serious illness. During the evening of Friday January 8th, he complained that the first finger on his right hand was sore, and said he had got something in it at his work, but he did not say when. He explained that he was putting some pickers on and caught his finger on one of these, but whether it was a piece of hide or not which had entered the finger he did not know. Whatever it was, it had burnt in owing to the picker being hot. He bathed the finger in hot water and applied a poultice, but despite further treatment, the infection became worse. He followed his employment until 5.30pm on Wednesday, January 13th, and on the 15th consulted Dr Lamberti, who treated the injury and ordered her husband to go to Victoria Hospital the following day. He paid two visits to the hospital, and ought to have gone there again on the 18th, but he was too ill to do so. Dr Lamberti, and later Dr Munroe, visited him frequently, and on the 21st a surgeon was called in. Despite this attention, however, her husband died last Saturday.
Sam Riley, another overlooker employed at Primrose Mill, said he was in the storeroom during the afternoon of January 11th, and in the course of a conversation Crewdson said he had injured the first finger of his right hand, at the same time holding up the bandaged finger, which was afterwards seen by other employees.
Dr Lamberti said the finger was septic when Crewdson first consulted him on January 15th. It was incised at the hospital, but the man’s condition grew worse, and his death on the 23rd was the result of septicaemia. Witness added that when he first examined the finger he found a small pin-prick between the first and second joints.
Witness agreed with Mr Riley that this could have been caused by a splinter which entered the finger as the man’s hand slid over the picker.
Dr Palin, Police Surgeon for the Brierfield district, said the post-mortem examination revealed the cause of death to be septic pneumonia due to infection from the finger. As the finger was very swollen the point of entry had passed away.
Witness agreed with Mr Riley that the medical history from January 8th onwards was consistent with the man having met with such an injury.
The Coroner said there had been great doubt as to the continuity between the alleged injury and the man’s death, but that had now been cleared away. He was quite satisfied that Crewdson did injure his finger in the way he had said at his work. Evidently it was just a pin-prick, and the man probably did not think at first that it was serious; nevertheless, he and his wife applied the necessary treatment from the outset. The man, being a conscientious workman, continued to follow his employment until he consulted the doctor on the 15th, but by that time septicaemia had got hold, and this caused his death. There was a chain of cause and effect between the injury and the man’s death, therefore the proper verdict was one of “Accidental death”. The Coroner said he did not doubt that the injury was caused while the man was following his employment, and deeply sympathised with the widow.
Mr Howarth expressed the regret of the employers, who recognised that they had lost a conscientious workman, and Mr Riley suitably replied on behalf of the widow.

Clara remarried to Smith Bannister sometime in the fourth quarter of 1946. She passed away in 1966 in Blackpool, Lancashire.

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