Bridget Maria Grainger

Sunday’s Obituary – Bridget Maria Musgrove (nee Grainger)

Bridget Maria Musgrove (nee Grainger) was the wife of my great grand uncle, Joseph Musgrove.

,Bridget has had a few mentions in my blog previously – herehereherehere, and here.

She was born on 23 February 1867. After marrying Joseph on 16 May 1891 in Clitheroe, Lancashire, the couple had eleven children between 1892 and 1911.

Bridget passed away on 10 November 1956. The following death notice was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 16 November 1956.

Bridget Maria Musgrove Obituary.png

MRS B M MUSGROVE

One of the oldest members of the Mothers’ Union at Clitheroe Parish Church, Mrs Bridget Maria Musgrove, of 35 Hayhurst Street, Clitheroe, died at her home on Saturday.

Born in West Leigh, Somerset, 89 years ago, Mrs Musgrove came to Clitheroe as a child. Her husband, the late Mr Joseph Musgrove, was a Corporation halberd bearer for many years.

A service was held in the Parish Church prior to interment at Clitheroe Cemetery on Wednesday. The Vicar, the Rev S Birtwell, and the curate, the Rev I D H Robins, officiated.

Mrs Musgrove leaves three sons and three daughters to whom general sympathy will be expressed.

Advertisements

Sunday’s Obituary – Joseph Musgrove (1864-1948)

Joseph Musgrove is my great grand uncle – in other words, brother of my great grandfather. His parents are John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth – my 2x great grandparents.

Joseph was born on 13 April 1864 in Darwen, Lancashire.

I have Joseph on all the census returns from 1871 to 1911 and in the 1939 Register. For most of these years his occupation was given as “labourer”. So I am guessing that he had a very hard working life.

On 16 May 1891Joseph married Bridget Maria Grainger at St. James Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire.

James and Bridget had eleven children between 1892 and 1911. The local paper published a story marking their golden wedding anniversary in 1941 – see blog post here.

Joseph passed away on 3 June 1948 and details of his death were published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 11 June 1948.

Joseph Musgrove Obituary - CAT 11 Jun 1948.png

MR JOSEPH MUSGROVE

Mr Joseph Musgrove of 66, Wilkin Street, Clitheroe who died yesterday week in his 85th year was one of the town’s best known characters.

He was a native of Darwen, but had spent most of his life in Clitheroe and a for a long number of years was employed in the Highways Department of the Corporation, retiring in 1932. For many years he was one of town’s halberd bearers.

Mr Musgrove was keenly interested in cricket and football and in April travelled to Rochdale to watch Clitheroe Football Club’s last away match of the season.

He was a member of the Royal Castle Lodge Ancient Order of Foresters and members of the order were present at the interment on Tuesday at St Mary’s Cemetery, conducted by the Rev J T Hall.

Mr Musgrove leaves a widow, three sons and three daughters who will have general sympathy in their bereavement.

Wedding Wednesday – Joseph Musgrove and Bridget Maria Grainger

Joseph Musgrove is my great grand uncle (the brother of my great grandfather Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove).

Joseph was born on 13 April 1864 to parents John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth (my 2x great grandparents).

On 16 May 1891 Joseph married Bridget Maria Grainger in Clitheroe, Lancashire. Bridget had been born on 23 February 1867 in Devon.

On the 9 May 1941 the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times published an article celebrating the golden wedding anniversary of Joseph and Bridget.

Joseph and Bridget Musgrove Golden Wedding.png

FAMILY OF ELEVEN

REARED ON £1 A WEEK

GOLDEN WEDDING MEMORIES OF MR. & MRS. J. MUSGROVE

An insight into conditions of life which obtained fifty or more years ago was given in an interview by Mr and Mrs Joseph Musgrove, of 66 Wilkin Street, Clitheroe, who will celebrate their golden wedding on Monday next. They were married on May 12, 1891, at St James’s Church, by the curate, the Rev Mr Ince.

STARTED WORK WHEN SIX!

Seventy-seven years of age and a native of Darwen, Mr Musgrove came to Clitheroe at the age of six and a half years, and started work in the spinning room at Messrs Dewhurst’s Salford Bridge Mills on attaining his eighth year. He was employed full time at eleven. When sixteen, he went to the print works at Barrow, but left there in 1896 to enter the employ of Clitheroe Corporation highways department, continuing for thirty years, except for a break of six years during which he worked as a mason’s labourer.

All his life, Mr Musgrove has taken a keen interest in both football and cricket, rarely missing a match either at Shaw Bridge or at Chatburn Road. For fifty-six years he has been identified with Court “Royal Castle” (No. 8549) of the Ancient Order of Foresters, and still holds the post of senior door beadle. For eleven years he was one of the borough’s halberdiers. “We had to buy our own top hats and white gloves in those days,” he said, adding: “There were none o’these fancy cloaks and three-cornered hats!”

SIXPENCE A WEEK!

Mrs Musgrove, whose maiden name was Miss Bridget Maria Grainger – she is a sister of the late Mr Luke Grainger, formerly of West View – was born seventy-four years ago near Taunton, Somerset, and came to Clitheroe at the age of sixteen. She learnt to weave at Salford Bridge Mill, where Mr Musgrove learnt spinning, but she had not had charge of two looms long when the mill closed down, and she was accordingly out of work for some time.

“Of course, I had been working for years before I came to Clitheroe,” she said. “Maybe you won’t believe me when I tell you that when eight years old, my wage was sixpence a week.”

Mrs Musgrove added the information that this remuneration was for looking after the smaller children of a well-to-do family, who also provided her with meals. “They regarded the sixpence as spending money, but my mother had to clothe me out of it,” she added.

Speaking of old times, Mrs Musgrove said: “Yes, they were hard, I can’t say I would like to live them over again – not under the same conditions, at any rate.” She went on to say that it was a big problem to bring up a family of eleven on £1 a week. “I can’t tell you how we managed, but we did. It was a hard struggle, but we were fortunate in having good health.”

SUPREME SACRIFICE

Of a family of eleven children, seven – three daughters and four sons survive. Of four sons who served in the last Great War, two made the supreme sacrifice.

All their married life Mr and Mrs Musgrove have been associated with St Mary’s Parish Church. Mrs Musgrove being one of the oldest and a founder member of the Mothers’ Union. Their golden wedding anniversary will be celebrated quietly at home, with just a few relatives and neighbours for tea. “Lord Woolton won’t let us do much more.” Mrs Musgrove said with a laugh.

In conjunction with their many friends, we wish them health and many more years of happiness together.

Military Monday – Henry John Grainger Musgrove (1892-1917)

Henry John Grainger Musgrove is my 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Joseph Musgrove and Bridget Maria Grainger. Our common ancestors are John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth, my 2x great grandparents.

Henry was the first of ten children by Joseph and Bridget. He was born on 9 April 1892 and baptised at St. James church, Clitheroe, Lancashire on 29 May 1892.

In the 1911 census Henry’s occupation was given as “baker”.

Unfortunately I haven’t been able to find any remaining records of Henry’s military service. However I know from the newspaper article below that he enlisted with the King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment on 11 December 1915. His service number was 21851 and at the time of his death on 24 June 1917 he was serving with the 7th Battalion.

The following article appeared in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 29 June 1917.

Henry J G Musgrove - CAT 29 June 1917

HOW PRIVATE H. MUSGROVE MET HIS DEATH

“It is my sad duty to write and inform you that I buried your son, yesterday (the 24th inst.). He was killed whilst with a working party, the previous night, and as our battalion is close at hand, Captain Kendall asked me to take charge of the burial. I expect the Authorities will inform you in due course, of the place of burial, and that they will erect a cross over his grave. Captain Kendall spoke in the very highest terms of your son’s bravery and usefulness as a soldier, and his death is much lamented by all his comrades. He has given his life for the greatest of all causes, and he now sleeps in an honoured grave, fondly remembered by all who knew him. May God bless and comfort you and all sorrowing relatives.”

The above letter, signed by the Rev. R. Kelso, Chaplain to the Royal Irish Rifles, has been received by Mr. Musgrove, Wilkin Street, and refers to his son, Private Hy. Musgrove, King’s Royal Lancaster Regt., who was 25 years of age, and enlisted on the 11th December, 1915. Deceased was well known throughout the district, being formerly in the employ of Mr. Dawson, Shaw Bridge. At the time he joined the Army, however, he was engaged as a baker for the Billington and Whalley Co-operative Society. He had been in France 13 months.

A couple of weeks later the following article was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 13 July 1917

Henry J G Musgrove - CAT 13 July 1917.png

PRIVATE HENRY J. G. MUSGROVE

Official confirmation of the death in action of Private Henry J. G. Musgrove, King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regt., was received on Friday last. He was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Musgrove, 66, Wilkin Street, a single man aged 25, and was, formerly employed by the Billington and Whalley Co-operative Society. He joined the forces in December, 1915, and went to France the following April. The circumstances under which he met death are given by his C.O. in a letter which is appended. Mr. and Mrs. Musgrove, who are to be commiserated with in their great loss, have two other sons in France, and one in training.

The first intimation of Private Musgrove’s untimely end came from Captain Pobert Kelso, Chaplain to the 13th Royal Irish Rifles: “It is my sad duty to wrote and inform you that I buried your son, yesterday (the 24th inst.). He was killed whilst with a working party, the previous night, ands our battalion is close at hand, Captain Kendall asked me to take charge of the burial. I expect the Authorities will inform you in due course, of the place of burial, and that they will erect a cross over his grave. Captain Kendall spoke in the very highest terms of your son’s bravery and usefulness as a soldier, and his death is much lamented by all his comrades. He has given his life for the greatest of all causes, and he now sleeps in an honoured grave, fondly remembered by all who knew him. May God bless and comfort you and all sorrowing relatives.”

Captain Kendall, writing on the 2nd inst., said: “It is with the deepest regret that I write to tell you, in case you have not already heard from other sources, of the death in action of your son, No. 21,851 Private Musgrove, of this regiment. He was killed while working in a trench at night, which work was part of the general operations in the Messines ridge. A shell landed in the midst of his party, causing immediate death to him and one of his comrades. I cannot tell you how sorry I am to lose him from my company, as he had many times proved himself a brave and valuable man. On one occasion, a few days before his death, he had volunteered to carry ammunition through heavy fire, and, altogether, was one of the men whom we could least afford to lose. I can only hope that the fact that he died a noble death, and also the fact that we miss him very much out here, may help to lighten your great sorrow.”

Private Musgrove had been connected with St. Mary’s Sunday School from childhood, and a hymn was sung to his memory and reference made to his death, on Sunday last. A memorial service, conducted by the Vicar, was held in the Church on Wednesday night.

Henry is buried at Wytschaete Military Cemetery in Belgium.

The following information is taken from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) website.

Wytschaete (now Wijtschate) was taken by the Germans early in November 1914. It was recovered by Commonwealth forces during the Battle of Messines on 7 June 1917, but fell into German hands once more on 16 April 1918. The village was recovered for the last time on 28 September. The cemetery was made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from isolated positions surrounding Wytschaete and the following small battlefield cemeteries:- REST AND BE THANKFUL FARM, KEMMEL: 23 UK burials (13 of them 2nd Suffolks), mostly of 1915. R.E. (BEAVER) FARM, KEMMEL: 18 Royal Engineer and four Canadian Engineer burials of 1915-1917. The CEMETERY NEAR ROSSIGNOL ESTAMINET, KEMMEL: 18 UK burials (11 of the 1st Wiltshire Regiment), of January-April 1915. SOMER FARM CEMETERY No.2, WYTSCHAETE: 13 UK burials made by IXth Corps in June 1917. GORDON CEMETERY, KEMMEL: 19 UK burials (14 of them 1st Gordon Highlanders) of January-May 1915. There are now 1,002 servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 673 of the burials are unidentified, but there are special memorials to 16 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials commemorate casualties known to have been buried at the Cemetery near Rossignol Estaminet, RE (Beaver) Farm and Rest and be Thankful Farm, whose graves could not be found on concentration. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

CemeteryImage.ashx

Wytschaete Military Cemetery

The article published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 19 July 1917 refers to three other brothers of Henry – at that time two were already in France and the other was in training.

These brothers were James, Albert and Tom. I am very happy to say that all three survived the war.

The Clitheroe Advertiser and Times published another article about the family on 19 October 1917.

CAT 19 October 1917.png

There are some pleasant incidents even in France, amid all the horrors and suffering entailed by the carnage of war. One such happened last Friday, when brothers Tom and Jim Musgrove (sons of Mr. and Mrs. Musgrove, Wilkin Street), met for the first time in two years. Each has since written to his parents saying how well the other looked, and what a pleasure it was to meet after such a long interval. Jim, who is attached to the Lancs. Fusiliers, has been at the front two years, and Tom, who was on his way to the Blue Cross hospital with a horse when the unexpected meeting took place, has been out with the East Lancs. nine months. Mr. and Mrs. Musgrove lost a son, henry, in action, and a fourth son, Albert, is a driver in the R.F.A., and is also across the Channel.

Military Monday – Tom Musgrove (1898-1969)

Tom Musgrove is my 1st cousin 2x removed – he is my maternal grandfather’s cousin. Our common ancestors are my 2x great grandparents John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth. Tom was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire about 1898 to parents Joseph Musgrove and Bridget Maria Grainger. He was the fourth of at least ten children.

On 13 May 1916 Tom went to Blackburn and enlisted in the 4th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment. He was 18 years 9 months old. The medical report written at the time of his enlistment describes him as having ‘bow legs’.

Tom remained at ‘home’ until 28 February 1917. He embarked the following day from Southampton to Le Havre, France.

During the period May to June 1918 Tom appears to have been ‘surplus’ and transferred between Battalions. He was also granted 4 days leave to England in August.

The next significant piece of information from Tom’s service record on www.ancestry.co.uk is that he was admitted to hospital on 6 April 1919 – I can’t make out what the record says – see below. Anyway whatever it was he had an operation and was subsequently discharged after 62 days on 6 June 1919.

He was finally demobilized on 4 December 1919 to the Class Z Reserve.

Class Z Reserve was authorised by an Army Order of 3 December 1918. There were fears that Germany would not accept the terms of any peace treaty, and therefore the British Government decided it would be wise to be able to quickly recall trained men in the eventuality of the resumption of hostilities. Soldiers who were being demobilised, particularly those who had agreed to serve “for the duration”, were at first posted to Class Z. They returned to civilian life but with an obligation to return if called upon. The Z Reserve was abolished on 31 March 1920.

Tom married Rhoda Kear in Q4 1921. I haven’t been able to find a record of any children. He died sometime in Q3 1969 in Clitheroe.

Military Monday – James Musgrove (1894-1925)

James Musgrove is my 1st cousin 2x removed – he is my maternal grandfather’s cousin. Our common ancestors are my 2x great grandparents John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth. He was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire about 1894 – the second of at least ten children – to parents Joseph Musgrove and Bridget Maria Grainger.

On 20 January 1915 James enlisted in the 18th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers. His regimental number was 16718. I’m not sure how good or bad his eyesight was but there is a note in his records that two pairs of glasses were issued to him, presumably resulting from his medical at the time he enlisted.

It was a further 12 months before James embarked for France on 29 January 1916.

There is not much detail in the pages about his war service on www.ancestry.co.uk. But it appears that James became ‘unfit’ for battle on 22 January 1917 and he was transferred to the Army Service Corps. He was given a new service number – 111748.

James was eventually demobilized to the Class Z Reserve on 15 March 1919.

Class Z Reserve was authorised by an Army Order of 3 December 1918. There were fears that Germany would not accept the terms of any peace treaty, and therefore the British Government decided it would be wise to be able to quickly recall trained men in the eventuality of the resumption of hostilities. Soldiers who were being demobilised, particularly those who had agreed to serve “for the duration”, were at first posted to Class Z. They returned to civilian life but with an obligation to return if called upon. The Z Reserve was abolished on 31 March 1920.

As far as I can tell James died sometime in Q2 of 1925.