Annie Simpson

Military Monday – Walter Paley (1896-1918) and Lawrence Paley (1898-1918)

This is primarily the story of two brothers born about 18 months apart and died within two days of each other but also of what happened to the rest of the family.

John Robert Paley is my 1st cousin 3x removed. His parents are Thomas Paley and Harriet Richmond. Our common ancestors are William Paley and Mary Blackey (my 3x great grandparents).

On 26 September 1894 John Robert married Annie Simpson at All Saints Church, Otley, West Yorkshire. By the time of the 1901 Census they had two sons who would be my 2nd cousins 2x removed:-

Walter – born in 1896 and baptised on 19 July 1896 at St John’s Church, Moor Allerton, Leeds, West Yorkshire

Lawrence – born in 1898 and baptised on 5 February 1898 also at St John’s Church, Moor Allerton.

St John's Church - Moor Allerton

St John’s Church – Moor Allerton

In the 1911 census John Robert was working as a domestic gardener, Walter was a caddie at Alwoodley Golf Course and Lawrence was still at school.

When the First World War came both sons signed up for service.

Walter – married Matilda Lois Price at St Edmund’s Church, Roundhay, Leeds, sometime in the June quarter of 1916. I’m not sure whether this was before or after he began his military service.

His military service number was 205927. He served as a Private in the 87th Training Reserve Battalion before being transferred to the 477th Agricultural Company Labour Corps.

Walter died of wounds on 25 March 1918 – his death is registered at Stamford, Lincolnshire. Presumably that was the nearest Registration District to wherever he died. He is buried at St John’s Church, Moor Allerton. There are a total of eleven casualties buried at the cemetery from both WW1 and WW2.

He is also commemorated on the WW1 Cross at Moor Allerton.

At the time of his death Walter had £5 16s 5d credit in his service account (see image from Army Register of Soldiers’ Effects below from http://www.ancestry.co.uk). This money was paid to his widow Matilda in September 1918. Followed on 19 November 1919 by a further payment of £3 War Gratuity.

Walter Paley - Effects.png

Lawrence – served as a Private in the 15th Battalion of the (Prince of Wales Own) West Yorkshire Regiment. His service number was 17/237.

I haven’t been able to find any service records for either brother. So all I know about Lawrence is that he was killed in action on 27 March 1918.

He is commemorated at the Arras Memorial in France. However I haven’t been able to find any details of a known grave for Lawrence. He is also commemorated on the WW1 Cross at Moor Allerton.

In the Army Register of Soldiers’ Effects (www.ancestry.co.uk) a sum of £27 0s 4d (which included a £19 War Gratuity was paid to his father on 29 December 1919. You can also see in the fifth column it says “death presumed”.

Lawrence Paley - Effects.png

Details of the pay rates for soldiers and War Gratuity can be found in these links.

Within 12 months their mother Annie was also dead – she passed away on 13 March 1919. All three are mentioned on the headstone below at St John’s Church.

Walter & Lawrence & Annie Paley

Walter’s widow, Matilda, married Arthur Mason sometime in the June quarter of 1927 – their marriage is registered at Caistor in Lincolnshire. As far as I can tell Matilda and Arthur Mason did not have any children. In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2 they are living in Blackwell, Derbyshire with Arthur described as a “railway goods guard”.

Arthur died on 13 October 1968 and Matilda on 28 June 1974. At the time of their deaths they were living at Keelby, Lincolnshire.

Walter and Lawrence’s father, John Robert, married Beatrice Bailes sometime in the September quarter of 1922. This marriage is registered in Leeds. They had five children:-

Harriet – 4 April 1921
Laurence – abt March 1923
John Robert – 7 May1925
James Edwin – 13 June 1928
Harry – 1 February 1930

So having lost one complete family all within 12 months John Robert had a second chance and his children this time lived fairly long lives.

John Robert died sometime in the June quarter of 1953 and Beatrice passed away on 12 October 1957 – she is also buried at St John’s Church.

Beatrice Paley.jpg

Beatric Paley – St John’s Church

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Wedding Wednesday – Edith May Musgrove and Malcolm Graham Frankland

Edith May Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Joseph Musgrove and Annie Simpson. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

Edith May married Malcolm Graham Frankland at St James Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire on 17 September 1955. Details of the wedding were announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 23 September 1955.

Frankland-Musgrove Wedding.png

FRANKLAND – MUSGROVE

Miss Edith May Musgrove, younger daughter of Mr and Mrs J Musgrove, of 58 West View, Clitheroe, was married at St James’s Church, Clitheroe, on Saturday, to Mr Malcolm Graham Frankland, only son of Mr and Mrs W Frankland, of Victoria Avenue, Chatburn.

Given away by her father, the bride was attired in a gown of white silk net over taffeta, trimmed with orange blossom, with a full-length veil surmounted with a wreath of orange blossom. She carried a bouquet of pink roses and white carnations.

She was attended by her sister, Mrs Norma Wearden, who wore a dress of blue net trimmed with white net and pearls. Her bouquet was of mixed sweet peas.

The best man was Mr M Nixon, a friend of the bridegroom, and the groomsmen were Mr B Wearden, brother-in-law of the bride, and Mr D Frankland, a friend of the groom.

During the ceremony, which was conducted by the Rector, the Rev J S Parry, the hymns “Lead us, Heavenly Father” and “The Voice that breath’d o’er Eden” were sung. Mr G Hitchen was organist.

A reception was held at the Station Hotel, Clitheroe, after which the couple left for a honeymoon in Blackpool, the bride wearing a lemon coloured dress and tweed coat, with tan accessories. They will reside at 58 West View, Clitheroe.

Among the numerous wedding gifts were a fruit set and wineglasses from workfriends of the bride at Stonebridge Mill, Chatburn, and a clock and towels from companions of the bridegroom in the 4th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment, TA.

Military Monday – Allen Simpson (1923-1943)

Allen Simpson is my 1st cousin 1x removed.  In other words he is my dad’s cousin.  Our common ancestors are James Dawson and Emma Buckley, my great grandparents.

Allen was born sometime in Q3 of 1923 in Keighley, West Yorkshire to parents Alfred Simpson and Annie Dawson.

As far as I can tell from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) website Allen served as a Private in The Parachute Regiment, AAC.  He was assigned to the 6th (10th Bn. The Royal Welch Fusiliers) Battalion – see this in Wikipedia.  His service number was 4868547.

Allen would have been involved in the Allied invasion of Italy at the beginning of September 1943.

Allen’s date of death is given as 10 September 1943.  And although I haven’t been able to prove this conclusively I believe he died during Operation Slapstick.  This was the code name for a British landing from the sea at the Italian port of Taranto.

The only casualties in the landing occurred on 10 September when HMS Abdiel, while maneuvering alongside the dock, struck a mine and sank.  There were 58 killed and 154 wounded from Allen’s battalion and 48 from the Abdiel’s crew.

I haven’t been able to find a list of casualties from the Welch Fusiliers but I found this Special Forces Roll of Honour which lists Allen as a casualty of the sinking of HMS Abdiel in Taranto Harbour.

Allen is buried in Bari War Cemetery in Italy – his grave reference is II.B.24.  Incidentally his name is recorded as Allen in the GRO birth records and as Alan on the CWGC website.

The following information is from the CWGC.

The site of Bari War Cemetery was chosen in November 1943.  There was no serious fighting in the vicinity of the town, which was the Army Group headquarters during the early stages of the Italian campaign, but it continued to be an important supply base and hospital centre, with the 98th General Hospital stationed there from October 1943 until the end of the war.  At various times, six other general hospitals were stationed at Trani and Barletta, about 48 km away.

Besides garrison and hospital burials, the cemetery contains graves brought in from a wide area of south-eastern Italy, from the ‘heel’ right up to the ‘spur’.  Here too are buried men who died in two disastrous explosions in the harbour at Bari, when ammunition ships exploded in December 1943 (during a German air raid) and April 1945.

Bari War Cemetery contains 2,128 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 170 of them unidentified.  There are also some non war burials and war graves of other nationalities.

The cemetery also contains 85 First World War burials, brought in from Brindisi Communal Cemetery in 1981.  Most of these burials are of officers and men of the Adriatic drifter fleet which had close associations with Brindisi during the First World War.

Here’s the certificate that you can obtain from the CWGC website.

Tombstone Tuesday – Joseph and Annie Musgrove

This headstone marks the resting place of my grand uncle Joseph Musgrove and his wife Annie Simpson.

Joseph was born 23 October 1912 to parents Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner – my great grandparents.  He was the youngest of at least ten children.  Annie was born 26 September 1907.

Joseph and Annie married sometime in the first quarter of 1933 and the marriage was registered at Clitheroe, Lancashire.  They had two daughters plus grandchildren and great grandchildren.

As you can see from the headstone Joseph died 11 November 1989 and Annie died 26 January 2004.  They are buried at Christ Church, Chatburn, Lancashire.