Black Sheep Sunday – Harrison Musgrove (Part 4)

Time has moved on – almost twenty years to 1863. Harrison Musgrove had married Jane Rooking on 11 April 1853 and by now they had at least five children.

However Harrison makes the local news again in the Westmorland Gazette on Saturday 31 January 1863. This time with two other men he is accused of night poaching.

Here’s the transcript:-

THURSDAY JAN. 29 (Before W H Wakefield, W Wilson and E Harrison, Esqs.)  Westmorland Gazette Jan 1863

NIGHT POACHING AND ASSAULT

William Backhouse, Harrison Musgrove, and John Thompson, were charged with night poaching in the township of Strickland Roger, upon land belonging to MR G A Gelderd, in the occupation of Mr Anthony Barnes. Backhouse was also charged with assaulting the gamekeeper, and this charge was first entered upon.

Wm. Gardener, gamekeeper, in the service of G A Gelderd, Esq., said that on Tuesday night, 27th inst., as he was out watching he came upon Backhouse, whom he saw in a crouching position about six or eight yards off. The prisoner got up and threw a large stone at him, which hit him on the breast and stunned him for a moment. He, however, on recovering himself seized hold of the prisoner and secured him.

The stone was produced and was of formidable size.

The prisoner, who did not deny the truth of the statement, was then charged with his companions with the offence of night poaching.

The gamekeeper, Gardener, stated that on Tuesday night he heard the three men, and waited until they came to a place where they knew there was game. They then began blocking up the “smoots” where the hares run, and he saw one man setting nets and another had a dog. It was a little before twelve o’clock, but the moon was not down. Witness afterwards heard a dog run, and came upon that man (Backhouse), who then threw the stone at him, as he had stated. There were three nets set, and if he had not interrupted them there would soon have been three hares in them.

The Bench sentenced all the defendants to three months imprisonment with hard labour for night poaching, and Backhouse in addition to a month’s imprisonment for the assault.

The prisoners will also have to find securities of 10l. each, upon the termination of the imprisonment for night poaching, or will be re-committed for six months.

Black Sheep Sunday – Harrison Musgrove (Part 3)

Two years have gone by since Harrison Musgrove (my 2x great grandfather) last appeared in the newspaper. It’s now Saturday 2 December 1843 and Harrison and his brother William have made the news again in the Westmorland Gazette – this time for allegedly stealing milk they are described as “rogues and vagabonds” and sent to the Kendal House of Correction.

Here’s the transcript:-

CAUTION TO VENDORS OF MILK – For several mornings previous to Friday in last week, Mrs Lamb, from Natland Mill Beck, who attends every morning with milk, missed several gallons, when about Capper Lane end. It appears that Mrs Lamb has to leave her cart at that place, while she proceeds down Pepper Corn Lane, to serve some customers there. During her absence there is little doubt that the milk had been feloniously drawn from the churns, and carried off. Information was given to Police-Sergeant Hutchinson, who disguised himself on the morning of the day in question, and took his station so as to be able to watch who should approach the cart. He was not long in suspense, for a number of young scamps made their appearance as soon as Mrs Lamb had disappeared, among whom were two boys of the names of William and Harrison Musgrove, who first filled a tea-kettle with the milk, but before the officer could secure them, they threw the kettle and its contents to the ground, and made off. However, he eventually secured them and brought them before John Wakefield, Esq. at the Town Hall, who, for want of sufficient evidence to convict them of felony, committed them to the Kendal House of Correction for two months each as rogues and vagabonds.

Westmorland Gazette Dec 1843

Wedding Wednesday – Annie Gawthrop & Thomas Luther Anderton

Annie Gawthrop is my 1st cousin 3x removed. She is the daughter of Israel Gawthrop and Mary Ann Hargreaves.

Here’s a report form the Burnley Express of the wedding that took place on 1 February 1902.

MARRIAGE – On Saturday, at the Wesleyan Chapel, Grange-over-Sands, the marriage took place of Miss Annie Gawthrope, fourth daughter of Mr. Israel Gawthrope, of Sabden, and Mr. T. L. Anderton, son of Mr. Thomas Anderton, of Sabden, and of the firm of Messrs. Bell and Anderton, Accrington. The bride was attended by her sister, Miss Bertha Gawthrope, and Mrs. Haworth, while Mr. John Anderton, brother of the bridegroom, was the best man. She was given away by her brother, Mr. Isaac Gawthrope, of Padiham. The wedding was a pretty, though quiet one. The newly-married couple will, after the honeymoon, take up their residence at Accrington. There were many presents.

Black Sheep Sunday – Harrison Musgrove (Part 2)

Well I’m sure you’ve all been wondering what happened to Harrison, his brother William and their friend James Thompson since Part 1 last week.

Thompson decided to plead not guilty and a report of his trial is in the Kendal Mercury of Saturday 23 October 1841.

To cut a long story short William Musgrove was called as a witness. He stated:-

“When I went away, Thompson was standing at the window, and that was the last I saw of him. What happened after that I did not see. I positively swear that when I went home, I left Thompson standing at the window. I was not to have part of the ginger bread. I knew where they were going. I was watching for nothing. When I was watching, I knew they were going to steal. If they had got anything, I was not to have any. I went from the bottom of Hallow Lane to the other side of the street. I don’t know my brother will get off easier if Thompson is brought in. I know he will get easier off if Thompson is to blame.”

The jury were instructed to consider how reliable William Musgrove’s evidence was. Perhaps he was trying to put more blame on Thompson when actually it was he and Harrison who were the real culprits.

In the end the jury found Thompson not guilty.

Harrison pleaded guilty – after all he was caught red handed by Mr Court with “three biscuits under his coat, and ginger bread and sugar in his hand”.

The report of Harrison’s conviction is in the Kendal Mercury of Saturday 30 October 1841. The transcript is as follows:-

Harrison Musgrove, who pleaded guilty of stealing from the shop of Mr Court, confectioner, Kendal, was sentenced to three days imprisonment, and to be, during that time, once privately whipped. The court remarked that he appeared to be Kendal Mercury Oct 1841only nine years of age, and that he had commenced a course which, if persevered in, would send him out of the country. It was lamentable to see so young a boy begin an evil course, and it was very questionable whether his parents had done their duty in bringing him up as they ought.

Wedding Wednesday – Ellen Gawthrop & John James Pilkington

Ellen Gawthrop is my 1st cousin 3x removed.  She married John James Pilkington on 27 September 1900 at the Wesleyan Chapel in Sabden, Lancashire.

I recently found this report of the wedding in the Burnley Express and couldn’t resist sharing it.  I can’t believe that the report actually includes what appears to be a full list of all the presents!!!

Certainly the happy couple were not going to be short of the odd silver tea spoon.  And perhaps Mr. & Mrs. Bamber were a bit embarrassed by their gift and felt the need to describe the size – a “massive flower stand”.

Ellen Gawthrop wedding 1900

Interesting Wedding – At two o’clock on Thursday afternoon, the Wesleyan Chapel at Sabden, was the scene of a wedding, the bride being Miss Ellen Gawthrop, Sabden, the third daughter of Mr. Israel Gawthrop, the esteemed manager of the  firm of Messrs. James Stuttard and Sons, Sabden, and the bridegroom, Mr. John James Pilkington, of Blackburn, but formerly of Sabden, and son of the late Mr. John Pilkington, Sabden.  Unusual interest was evinced in the wedding by the villagers, and the interesting ceremony, which was performed by the Rev. J. H. Wilkinson, Wesleyan minister, of Padiham, was witnessed by a very large company of friends.  The interior of the chapel had been decorated with choice flowers, etc., and the ceremony was altogether an imposing one.  The bride, who was given away by her father, Mr. Israel Gawthrop, looked exceedingly charming in a rich dress of white alpaca, trimmed with lace, with hat to match.  She was attended by Miss Annie Gawthrop and Miss Bertha Gawthrop, sisters, who were attired in dresses of heliotrope, with grey felt hats, and Miss May Jackson, Padiham, and Miss Clarris Entwistle (nieces), who wore dresses of cream alpaca, with whitehats and shoes to match.  Mr. Frank Entwistle, brother-in-law to the bridegroom, acted as best man.  After the ceremony the wedding party, to the number of about 50, had a drive to Higher Hodder Bridge, where they were entertained to a sumptuous repast.  Mr. and Mrs. Pilkington left in the afternoon, amidst the heartiest good wishes of all, for Scarborough, where they intend to spend the honeymoon.

The following is the list of presents:- Mr. and Mrs. Gawthrop, cheque; Mr. and Mrs. I Gawthrop, dinner service; Mr. and Mrs. Jackson (Padiham), eider down quilt; Mr. and Mrs. Haworth, two door mats; Mr. and Mrs. Wilkinson, silver spirit kettle; Mr. and Mrs. Entwistle, toilet set; Mr. and Mrs. Pilkington, silver coffee pot and cruet; Miss A. Gawthrop and Mr. T. L. Anderton, marble timepiece; Miss B. Gawthrop and Mr. R. Anderton, tea service; Miss Gregson, silver salts in case; Miss Birtwistle and Mr. Dixon (Padiham), one dozen silver tea spoons, Miss Webster, silver cake knife; Mr. and Mrs. Ayrey, oak barometer; Miss Whittles, bedroom slippers and salts; Mrs. Bailey, cushion; Miss Foulds and Miss Birtwell, silk head-rest and tea cosy; Miss McLachlan, hall brushes with mirror; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ingham (Blackburn), half a dozen silver desert spoons and forks; Miss Mary and Master Harry Jackson (Padiham), cheese dish and pickle jar; Mr. and Mrs. Stuttard (Read Hall), travelling clock and cheque; Miss Haworth, one dozen silver tea spoons; Miss Brotherton, brass paper rack; Miss Nuttall, plaques; Mrs. Duerden, set of jugs; Mrs. Fish, one dozen silver tea spoons in case; Mr. and Mrs. Hopkinson, cheque; Mrs. Townsend (Manchester), silver cake basket; Miss Burton, silver cruet and jam spoons; Miss Bradshaw, d’oyleys; Mr. Burton (Fence), timepiece; Mr. and Mrs. Kay (Darwen), mirror in brass frame; Mr. Harry Pilkington (America), silver sugar sifter; Mr. and Mrs. E. Standing, brass photo frame; Mr. and Mrs. H. Barnes (Darwen), picture; Mrs. Harwood (Darwen), silver cake knife; Mr. and Mrs. Bamber, massive flower stand; Miss Whittaker, fruit dish; Mr. and Mrs. Bradshaw (Southport), half a dozen silver tea spoons and tray cloth; Miss Anderton; trinket set; Miss Standing, brass stand; Mr. Rigby (Swinton), half a dozen tea, desert, and table spoons; Miss Gawthrop, drawing-room chair; the Misses Rowland (Blackpool), Dresden vase and afternoon tray cloth; Mrs. Foulds, plaques; Mrs. Roberts, bread-board, knife, etc.

Black Sheep Sunday – Harrison Musgrove (Part 1)

I have recently started using the British Newspaper archive on Find My Past. I decided to begin with my ancestors from Kendal and surrounding areas as I have some family names that might be fairly easy to trace if they appear in the local papers.

As I suspected I found some stories pretty quickly.

In fact my 2x great grandfather, Harrison Musgrove, appears several times during a period of over twenty years.

So for my first foray into “black sheep’ territory I have decided to serialise Harrison Musgrove’s exploits over the next few weeks.

The first story comes from the Kendal Mercury on Saturday 11 September 1841 and is transcribed below:-

Police Office, Wednesday – (Before John Wakefield, Esquire). – Three boys, named Harrison Musgrove, William Musgrove, and James Thompson, were placed at the Bar by PC’s Hodgson and Brunskill, charged with stealing from the shop of Mr Court, confectioner, Highgate, a quantity of biscuits, loaf sugar, etc. It appeared that Thompson, who is the eldest, opened the shop door and let in Harrison Musgrove, who was without shoes, whilst he himself watched through the window ready to sound a retreat should Mr Court come into the shop, and William Musgrove waited on the other side of the street to give the signal should any policeman make his appearance. Unluckily for the young thieves Mr Court stepped into the shop and caught Harrison behind the counter; the others fled, but were subsequently taken. Harrison Musgrove and Thompson were committed for trial at the sessions, and William Musgrove admitted as evidence.

Well it seems to me that poor Harrison was badly let down here on three counts.

  • Firstly – James Thompson didn’t do a very good job as a “look out” and failed to sound  the retreat quickly enough.
  • Secondly – the other two accomplices scarpered at the first sign of trouble.
  • Thirdly – his brother William (about six years older) is going to give evidence as a witness.

Next week – a report of the trial. Guilty or not guilty – punishment or no punishment. You’ll just have to wait and see.

Kendal Mercury Sep 1841

Military Monday – Walter Dawson (1883-1942)

Walter Dawson is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. I recently discovered him and his military record as a result of a contact through my blog with a newly found relative in New Zealand.

Walter was born in 1883 to parents Joseph Dawson and Alice Hartley in Marsden, Lancashire. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson – my 4x great grandparents.

On 9 December 1898 Walter emigrated with his aunt and uncle, Alice Dodgeon (nee Dawson) and Frederick William Dodgeon. They were heading for Sydney, Australia. At some point after arriving in Australia they all moved to New Zealand.

According to the military records Walter enlisted in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force on 19 June 1917 for the duration of the war. His service reckons from 26 July 1917 and he was finally discharged on 18 June 1819 having spent a total of 1 year and 328 days in service and reaching the rank of lance corporal. Walter’s regimental number was 3/3732.

At the time he enlisted he was living with his aunt and uncle at 34 Coyle Street, Mount Albert, Auckland, New Zealand. His occupation was a clerk.

Walter served with the New Zealand Medical Corps and spent the first part of his service (118 days) in New Zealand. He was then posted overseas on 21 November 1917. He disembarked in Liverpool, England on 8 January 1918.

He was appointed lance corporal on 15 August 1918.

Walter returned to New Zealand after the war and married May Parslow in 1925. As far as I know they had one son – Peter. Following Walter’s death in 1942 I think May and Peter  came to live in the UK.

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