My Family

Posts about my family

Sunday’s Obituary – Mary Patricia Lord (1940-1951)

Mary Patricia Lord is my 2nd cousin. Her parents are John Edward Lord and Marjorie Musgrove. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

Mary was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire. Her birth is registered in the March quarter of 1940.

I already knew that she had died at the very young of eleven. And while researching the newspaper archives for my post about her father (see link above) I came across the following story from the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 24 August 1951.

Mary Patricia Lord - CAT 24 August 1951.png

Inquest Verdicts On Victims Of Clitheroe Accidents

Verdicts of “accidental death” were returned at Blackburn inquests on Friday on 11-year-old Mary Patricia Lord, of 5, Beech Street, Clitheroe, who died from injuries received when she fell from her cycle, and on 68-year-old Samuel Cook, a patient of Clitheroe Hospital, who was knocked down by a car outside the hospital and later died in Blackburn Royal Infirmary.

Described by witnesses as “a very careful rider,” Pat, who was given the cycle as a present when she passed the examination for entrance to Clitheroe Grammar School, lost control when her foot slipped from the pedal, while riding in Peel Street, last Tuesday.

She fell, struck her head on the kerb-edge, and died the following day in Blackburn Royal Infirmary.

The jury returned their verdict without retiring.

So Marjorie (my 1st cousin 1x removed) lost her husband in WW2 after less than five years of marriage and then her daughter at the age of eleven.


Military Monday – John Edward Lord (1917-1944)

John Edward Lord is the husband of my 1st cousin 1x removed, Marjorie Musgrove. Marjorie’s parents are James Musgrove and Edith Jane Hibble. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

John Edward was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire on 16 December 1917 to parents Edmund and Betty Lord (nee Capstick).

John and Marjorie married on 19 August 1939 at Clitheroe Congregational Church – I posted a newspaper report of their marriage last week – here. They had one daughter, Mary Patricia who was born in 1940.

John served in the 2nd Battalion, Coldstream Guards in WW2. His service number was 2659738.

In the Winter months of 1944 the 2nd Coldstream Guards took part in the Battle for Monte Ornito in the mountains of Italy from 8 February to 20 February. It was in this battle that John lost his life. According to the newspaper reports below John suffered chest wounds on 17th February and died in hospital on 20 February.

Clitheroe Advertiser and Times – 3 March 1944

John E Lord - CAT 3 March 1944.png



News was received by his wife yesterday that Guardsman John Edward Lord, eldest son of Mr and Mrs E Lord, of 29, Pendle Road, Clitheroe, had been killed in action in Italy. Twnety-five years of age, Guardsman Lord joined the Army shortly after the outbreak of war, leaving his employment as a conductor with the Ribble Motor Services. His brother, Ronald, a member of the local Territorial unit, is a prisoner of war. General sympathy will be accorded his wife and child, who live at 27, Chatburn Road, and his parents, in their sorrow.





Clitheroe Advertiser and Times – 10 March 1944

John E Lord - CAT 10 March 1944

Mrs Lord, of Chatburn Road, Clitheroe, has received a letter from a chaplain in which he says that her husband, Guardsman John E Lord, whose death on active service we reported last week, died in hospital on February 20th, after being admitted on the 17th, suffering from chest wounds. “Everything humanly possible was done for him, and he showed great patience and courage.” the chaplain says. “He made a great fight for his life, and died peacefully. He lies buried in a little English cemetery in beautiful country in the Italian hills. A simple wooden cross is placed on his grave.”

Clitheroe Advertiser and Times – 24 March 1944

John E Lord - CAT 24 March 1944.png



A portion of the morning service at Clitheroe Congregational Church, on Sunday, was set apart in remembrance of Guardsman John E Lord, who died of wounds in Italy. At the close of his sermon, the Rev J A Sinclair said: “We are today honouring one and thinking lovingly and gratefully of one who has laid down his life in the hope that it was not in vain. We are not out to glorify war, for war in itself has no glory; but we wish to pay our token of respect and esteem to one of our young men, John Ernest Lord, the fourth on our Honour Roll of those who have passed on. We did not have him long here, having come to us after the closing of Mount Zion Chapel, but long enough to know him fairly intimately. We shall remember him as quiet and unassuming, but willing to give himself courageously and unselfishly that tyranny and oppression might not strut across the earth in all its proud boastfulness and hideousness.”

John Edward Lord is buried at Minturno War Cemetery in Italy. His grave is marked by a cross with inscription:-


The following information is from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website.


Minturno War Cemetery

On 3 September 1943 the Allies invaded the Italian mainland, the invasion coinciding with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side. Allied objectives were to draw German troops from the Russian front and more particularly from France, where an offensive was planned for the following year. Progress through southern Italy was rapid despite stiff resistance, but by the end of October, the Allies were facing the German winter defensive position known as the Gustav Line, which stretched from the river Garigliano in the west to the Sangro in the east. Initial attempts to breach the western end of the line were unsuccessful and it was not until 17 January 1944 that the Garigliano was crossed, and Minturno taken two days later. The site for the cemetery was chosen in January 1944, but the Allies then lost some ground and the site came under German small-arms fire. The cemetery could not be used again until May 1944 when the Allies launched their final advance on Rome and the US 85th and 88th Divisions were in this sector. The burials are mainly those of the heavy casualties incurred in crossing the Garigliano in January. Minturno War Cemetery contains 2,049 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. The cemetery was designed by Louis de Soissons.

Wedding Wednesday – Marjorie Musgrove and John Edward Lord

Marjorie Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. Her parents are James Musgrove and Edith Jane Hibble. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

Marjorie was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire in 1921.

On 19 August 1939 Marjorie married John Edward Lord at Clitheroe Congregational Church. A report of the wedding was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 25 August 1939.

Marjorie Musgrove & John E Lord wedding.png


On Saturday last, at Clitheroe Congregational Church, the Rev. J. A. Sinclair performed the nuptials of Mr. John Edward Lord, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Lord, of 29 Pendle Road, and Miss Marjorie Musgrove, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. Musgrove, 15 Woone Lane.

The bride, given away by her father, was gowned in blue satin, with tight fitting sleeves and heart shaped neck-line. The veil was surmounted by a halo of flowers, the bouquet being composed of pink carnations, orange blossom and white heather.

The bridesmaids were Miss B. Musgrove (sister) and Miss A. Lord, of Blackburn, the bridegroom’s cousin. They were gowned in pale pink lace over slips of a similar shade, trimmed with pale blue ribbon, the pink veils being surmounted by floral halos. Pink and mauve sweet peas formed the bouquets.

The best man was Mr. R. Lord, and the groomsman Mr. T. Hibble. The church had been specially decorated with pink carnations by Mrs. Ratcliffe, and Mr. A. Taylor was at the organ. As they left the church, bride and bridegroom were presented with a silver horse-shoe by Mrs. Preston.

The bridegroom’s gift to the bride was a gold wristlet watch, and dress rings to the bridesmaids. The bride presented the bridegroom with gold cuff-links. A reception was held at the Starkie Arms Hotel. Mr. and Mrs. Lord are residing at 27 Chatburn Road.


Military Monday – Howard Westwood (1896-1916)

Howard Westwood is my wife’s 2nd cousin 1x removed. His parents are Edwin Westwood and Mary Ann Harris. Their common ancestors are William Skelding and Catherine Taylor, my wife’s 2x great grandparents.

Howard was born in 1896 in Lye, Worcestershire – his birth is registered in the June quarter of that year.

Sometime after the outbreak of WW1 Howard signed up for service with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment and was assigned to the 11th Battalion – his service number was 27765.

The 11th Battalion landed in France in July 1915.

Howard was killed in action on 15 November 1916.

I have found the War Diaries for the Royal Warwickshire Regiment and can see what the Regiment were doing at the time Howard was killed.

Orders were received from the 99th Brigade that Munich Trench would be attacked at 9am on 15 November 1916. The attack would be carried out by the 8th East Lancs and 10th Loyal North Lancs Regiments, supported by the 11th Royal Warwickshire’s. The trench was found to be very strongly held and the attack was held up.

Royal Warwickshire War Diaries.png

I am assuming that Howard was killed during this attack.

Munich Trench was a German trench near Beaumont-Hamel in France and was eventually captured on 11 January 1917.

Howard is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

Thiepval Memorial

Thiepval Memorial


Sunday’s Obituary – James Bowes (1861-1955)

James Bowes is the husband of my 2nd cousin 3x removed Ada Welsh.

James was born on 23 December 1861 in Burnley, Lancashire. he married Ada at Holy Trinity church, Habergham eaves, Lancashire on 25 September 1886.

Over the next twenty one years James and Ada had eleven children.

In the census returns for 1891, 1901 and 1911 James was described as a “cotton beamer”.

James died on 12 February 1955 and his death was reported in the Nelson Leader on 18 February 1955.

James Bowes - Nelson Leader 18 Feb 1955.png

Mr James Bowes

In the RC Section of Nelson Cemetery, on Tuesday, the remains were interred of Mr James Bowes, 76 Southfield Street, Nelson, who died on Saturday, aged 93 years. The Rev. Fr. Hope officiated. One of the oldest blind pensioners in Nelson, Mr Bowes is survived by three daughters and two sons. Solemn Requiem Mass was celebrated in St. George’s Church by Fr. Hope prior to the interment.

There were no flowers by request.

Mass offerings:- daughters Ida, Eva, Lilly; Mrs Dee and Mr Chapman; Mrs Laycock; Mrs Corrigan; Katie Hargreaves, Bob, Eileen (Canada); S.V.P. Saint George.

Undertakers:- Nelson Co-op, Funeral service.


Elsie Cracknell (1915-1981)

Elsie Cracknell is my 4th cousin 1x removed. Her parents are William Henry Cracknell and Lily Eastwood. Our common ancestors are Anthony Mason and Mary Brayshaw, my 4x great grandparents.

Elsie was born in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on 5 May 1915. She never married and passed away in 1981 – her death is registered in the December quarter.

In 1919, at the age of 4, Elsie was involved in a car accident. I found the following newspaper report in the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer of 29 April 1920.

Elsie Cracknell - Yorkshire Post & Leeds Intelligencer 29 April 1920.png



At Leeds County Court, yesterday, before his Honour, Judge Parfitt, K.C., Frederick Snape, a taxi-cab proprietor, of Wetherby, was the defendant in an action for damages for £100 in respect of injuries suffered by Elsie Cracknell, aged 4, the daughter of a mechanic, living at 8, Bayswater Street, Roundhay Road, Leeds. The child was knocked down in March of last year by a taxi-cab, owned by the defendant, and driven by Charles Henry Patrick, a youth of 18. The child sustained a depressed fracture on the left side of the head, just above the ear, her left arm and leg were injured, and she was an inmate of the Infirmary for two months in consequence. The plaintiff’s case, which was conducted by Mr J A Greene, was that Patrick was driving a taxi from Leeds towards Roundhay at a very rapid pace. Near Spencer Place an outward tramcar was standing, and Patrick, seeing people getting on and off the car, instead of slackening speed, merely sounded his horn, swerved round the tramcar and knocked down the child, who was a little higher up the Roundly Road. Patrick was driving so quickly that after he had knocked the child down his car ran about 20 yards before bring brought to a standstill. This version was bourne out by several witnesses.

Mr T P Perks appeared for the defence, and the driver of the taxi declared that the child rushed out of Spencer Place in front of his car, which he had not time to pull up. He stoutly denied that there was any tramcar near Spencer Place, and said he swerved in order to try and miss the child. He was travelling between 12 and 15 miles an hour.

His Honour held that the car was being driven at an excessive speed under the circumstances, and there would be judgment for the full amount claimed, with costs.

This was before the NHS in the UK – so I wonder what the cost of treatment and two months in the Infirmary would have been.


Sunday’s Obituary – Ada Bowes (nee Welsh) 1867-1950

Ada Welsh is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. Her parents were Patrick Welsh (or sometimes Walsh) and Charlotte Stowell. Our common ancestors were John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff, my 4x great grandparents.

Ada was born on 11 April 1867 and her birth was registered in Burnley, Lancashire. As far as I have been able to establish she was the first of at least seven children.

On the 25 September 1886, at the age of 19, Ada married James Bowes at Holy Trinity church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

James and Ada had eleven children over the next twenty one years.

In the census returns of 1891 and 1911 Ada’s occupation is given as “cotton winder”. And in the 1939 Register she is described as doing “unpaid domestic duties”.

Ada died on 16 May 1950 and her death was reported in the Nelson Leader on 26 May 1950.

Ada Bowes - Nelson Leader 26 May 1950.png

Mrs Ada Bowes

At the Nelson Cemetery, RC Section, on Friday the interment took place of Mrs Ada Bowes, 76, Southfield Street, Nelson, whose death, at the age of 83, occurred the previous Tuesday. The Rev. Father Hope officiated.

Floral tributes from:- Lily and Harry; Jim and Eva and brother Jim and Madge; Agnes Corrigan; Bobbie and Brian; Mrs Lonsdale; and others.

Mass Offerings:- Dad and Ida; S.V.P and Married Ladies, St George’s; Margaret Dee; Mrs Laycock; Mr and Mrs Chapman; Bob, Eileen and the boys (Canada); Cissie McIntyre.

Undertakers:- Helliwell Funeral Service.