Month: November 2019

Wedding Wednesday – Joseph Lynn Cuffley and Georgina Paley Aisbitt

you don't choose your family

I orginally published this Wedding Wednesday blog back in July this year. I have since acquired a wedding day photograph of Joseph and Georgina – so this is a great opportunity to republish the blog post with the photograph.

Georgina Paley Aisbitt is my 2nd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Matthew Gullford Aisbitt and Rhoda Paley. Our common ancestors are James Paley and Mary Ann Spink – my 2x great grandparents.

Georgina was born on 24 August 1920 and her birth was registered in the East Ward district of Westmorland.

Sometime in the first quarter of 1944 Georgina married Joseph Lynn Cuffley and a report of the wedding was published in the Penrith Observer of 22 February (image taken from (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Cuffley & Aisbitt Wedding - Penrith Observer 22 February 1944.pngCUFFLEY – AISBITT, AT KIRKBY STEPHEN

The marriage took place at Kirkby Stephen, conducted by the Rev C F Cardale, of Mr Joseph Lynn Cuffley and Miss Geanie…

View original post 284 more words

Remembrance Sunday 2019

Unknown.jpegToday I remember all the brave men and women from my family and my wife’s family who fought in either WW1 or WW2. Some made the ultimate sacrifice and some survived and returned home but I’m sure their lives were forever haunted by what they experienced. Every year the list grows longer as my research discovers more names. You can read some of their stories in the Military Monday category of my blog.

WW1

Prince Dawson (1893-1915) John Robert Arthur Steel (1886-1916)
Henry John Grainger Musgrove (1892-1917) Howard Westwood (1896-1916)
Richard James Taylor (1885-1918) Clement May (1895-1916)
David Musgrove Bratherton (1894-1916) Thomas Baldwin (1888-1917)
Fred Paley (1893-1918) Albert Espley (1896-1916)
Robert Alexander Carradice (1890-1919) John Bentley Hurtley (1885-1917)
Cyril Gostelow (1897-1916) Richard Espley (1875-1915)
Jack Gawthrop (1899-1918) Herbert Bolton (1889-1917)
John Ainsworth (1892-1916) Arthur Lockington (1892-1915)
Ernest Aldersley (1899-1918) George Hurtley (1891-1918)
Frederick Espley (1881-1916) Thomas Musgrove (1894-1918)
Walter Paley (1896-1918) Lawrence Paley (1898-1918)
Harry Pemberton (1884-1914)
Ernest Bartholomew (1899-1975) Flather Heap (1897-1962)
Dent Stowell 1882-1948) Ernest J Jackson
Amos William Espley (1893-1969) John Espley (1883-1938)
Thomas Darby (1879-1945) Samuel Buckley (1886-1966)
Hedley Duckworth (1885-1955) Walter Dawson (1883-1942)
Thomas William Paley (1892-1943) Tom Musgrove (1898-1969)
James Musgrove (1894-1925) Harry Musgrove (1889-1974)
William Dawson (1880-1939) Watson Emmott Dawson (1887-1944)
Harry Dawson (1895-1954) Clifford Dawson (1900-1953)
Arthur Dawson (1879-1944) Tom Hurtley (1897-1977)
Jim Hurtley (1887-1947) John Dawson (1890-1961)
Herbert Carradice (1896-1935) Hugh Buckley

WW2

Allen Simpson (1923-1943) Curtis Walker (1918-1942)
John Edward Lord (1917-1944) Robert Scott (1908-1941)
Robert Titterington (1905-1945) Jack Hurtley Thompson (1921-1941)
Philip Melville Cardell (1917-1940) Frederick Ellis Spink DFC (1921-1944)
Richard Henry Espley (1906-2006) William Herbert Jowett (1891-1972)

The Soldier – by Rupert Brooke

If I should die, think only this of me:
That there’s some corner of a foreign field
That is forever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,
A body of England’s, breathing English air,
Washed by the rivers, blest by the suns of home.
And think, this heart, all evil shed away,
A pulse in the eternal mind, no less
Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;
Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness,
In hearts at peace, under and English heaven.

Black Sheep Sunday – John James Spears (1848-1906)

John James Spears is the husband of my wife’s 1st cousin 3x removed, Sarah Jane Broad.

Sarah Jane was born in 1849 and her birth is registered at Congleton, Cheshire in the December quarter. Her parents are James Broad and Ann Owen. The common link between my wife and Sarah Jane is James Owen and Martha Brockhouse, my wife’s 3x great grandparents.

On 1 September 1870 Sarah Jane married John James Spears in Manchester, Lancashire. James was born at Newton Heath, Lancashire in 1848. After their marriage they lived in the Chorlton area of Manchester – John James working as a warehouseman.

John James found himself the subject of a County Court action for damages and the case was reported in the Manchester Evening News on Friday 10 February 1899. The case was also reported in the Bradford Daily Telegraph (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

John James Spears - Manchester Evening News 10 Feb 1899.png

A TALE OF DOG AND HORSE
SINGULAR COUNTY COURT ACTION

His Honour Judge Parry, sitting in the Manchester County Court, today, heard an action for damages for injuries to a horse belonging to Messrs. Eastman’s, Limited, butchers. Mr. Langdon appeared for the plaintiffs, and Mr. Cobbett represented the defendant, John James Spears, warehouseman, Lister Street, Chorlton-on-Medlock.
Mr. Langdon said that in November last Mr. Harris, sub-manager for the plaintiff firm, was driving along Everton Road, when a sable collie dog, belonging to the defendant, rushed out of the house, barking furiously, and rushed at the hind legs of the mare. The result was that the mare became restive, and kicked out and injured her legs by striking the steps of the vehicle. The animal was valued at £40, and it had to be sold for £21, while it was, later on, re-sold for £15.
Harris, the sub-manager for the plaintiffs, stated that the mare was a four-year-old, and was bought in Ireland last August for £28. The defendant’s dog had frequently rushed at the mare.
In reply to Mr. Cobbett, witness said he could not say that the dog bit the mare.
Mr. Langdon said the case was taken under 28 and 29 Vic., chap. 60, wherein it was provided that the owner of every dog shall be liable in damages for injury done to cattle or sheep. That, he contended, placed the responsibility on the owner who kept the dog at his own peril. There was a similar case decided in 1868, when a horse, which was being driven along, suffered injuries through kicking out in consequence of being bitten by a dog.
His Honour asked what magisterial jurisdiction there was over ferocious dogs, and Mr. Cobbett said the justices were at liberty to order them to be kept under proper control or to be destroyed.
His Honour said a dog might not be ferocious or mischievous, but might bark and jump about with pleasure.
Mr. Langdon said a dog might, for its own pleasure, go into a larder and steal a leg of mutton, but that would be mischievous.
Considerable argument followed as to whether the statute intended that there should be actually injury inflicted by the dog, Mr. Langdon contending that the injury arising from the action of the dog was sufficient for his claim.
His Honour reserved his decision until the 23rd inst.

So everyone involved in the case had a couple of weeks to wait for the Judge to decide the outcome of the case. As promised he gave his ruling on 23 February 1899 and fortunately the Manchester Evening News reported it for us.

John James Spears - Manchester Eving News 23 Feb 1899.png

SINGULAR ACTION AGAINST DOG OWNER

His Honour Judge Parry, at the Manchester County Court this morning, gave judgement in the case of Eastmans, Limited, v. John Jas. Spears which was before the court recently. The claim was for £21 11s 6d damages alleged to have been caused to the plaintiffs’ horse and cart in consequence of the defendant’s dog barking and frightening the animal. The plaintiffs, for whom Mr. Langdon appeared, are butchers, and Mr. Cobbett represented the defendant, who lives in Lister Street, Chorlton-on-Medlock. The Judge stated that the facts of the case were that a carter was driving a horse and cart along the roadway when a dog barked and the animal bolted. The horse kicked the step of the vehicle and so injured itself. He (the Judge) found that the dog did belong to the defendant, but that it was not a mischievous animal. The dog rushed and barked but it did not bite the horse. The injuries caused to the horse did not naturally arise through the barking of the dog and that there must be judgment for the defendant with costs.

I’m sure John James and his sable collie were very relieved at the outcome. Not so much Messrs. Eastman’s Ltd.