Month: August 2019

Joseph Frank Musgrove (1925-1987) – Cycle Accident

Joseph Frank Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. His parents are John Robert Turner Musgrove and Phoebe Scott. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner – my great grandparents.

Joseph was born on 2 November 1925 in Clitheroe, Lancashire. In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2, Joseph was living with his parents and brother at Hayhurst Street, Clitheroe.

In September 1941 Joseph was involved in a motor accident while riding his pedal cycle. Details of the accident were reported in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on Friday 19 September (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Joseph Frank Musgrove (1) - CAT 19 Sept 1941.png

An accident occurred on Friday, at the junction of Duck Street and Shaw Bridge Street, when a pedal cyclist, Joseph Frank Musgrove, a bobbin turner, residing at 32 Hayhurst Street, was knocked down by a motor car driven by John Brandwood, of 4 Rawley Street, Burnley. The unfortunate man’s left arm was fractured, or splintered. After receiving attention from Dr. Cooper he was taken home.

The case came to court on Thursday 25 September 1941 and the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times reported the outcome the next day.

Joseph Frank Musgrove (2) - CAT 26 Sept 1941.png

Collision Sequel

CONFLICT OF EVIDENCE: CASE DISMISSED.

“As there appears to be a conflict of evidence, we have decided to dismiss this case,” said Councillor French, presiding at the Borough Sessions, yesterday, when John Brandwood, a fitter, of 4 Rowley Street, Burnley, was summoned for driving without due care and attention and for failing to conform to a halt sign.
It was stated that defendant’s vehicle collided at the junction of Duck Street and Lowergate with a cycle ridden by Joseph Frank Musgrove (15), bobbin worker, of 32 Hayhurst Street, who was thrown from his machine, fracturing his left arm and bruising his leg.
Evidence was given by Mrs. Ida Gradwell, of Shaw Bridge House, and Thomas Ainsworth, of 44 Shaw Bridge Street, that defendant, who proceeded out of Duck Street, did not stop at the halt sign.
Defendant, who was represented by Mr. C. S. Corder, of Manchester, maintained that he did stop, but not at his usual place, because of the position of two other vehicles, and that Musgrove, who was riding at a fast speed, collided with his vehicle when it was travelling at only two miles an hour.
Corroborative evidence was given by John Wood, 31 Bank House Street, Burnley, and Eric Heyworth, 35 Myers Street, Burnley, who were passengers in defendant’s car.

Seems to me that Councillor French and others on the bench decided to take the easy option here.

Advertisements

Wedding Wednesday – Dudley Greaves Harrison and Marguerite Thornton

Dudley Greaves Harrison is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. His parents are George Holroyd Harrison and Florence Shaw Hurtley. Our common ancestors are Thomas Hurtley and Hannah Braidley – my 3x great grandparents.

Dudley was born on 2 December 1903 in Leeds, West Yorkshire. He was baptised on 13 March 1904 at St. Michael’s Church, Headingley, Leeds.

Dudley Harrison and Marguerite Thornton

Dudley and Marguerite

On Thursday 16 June 1932 Dudley married Marguerite Thornton at Wetherby Parish Church, Yorkshire. Details of the wedding were announced in the Yorkshire Evening Post on the same day (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Dudley Harrison & Marguerite Thornton - YEP 16 June 1932.png

A WETHERBY BRIDE

Miss Marguerite Thornton and Mr. D. G. Harrison

The wedding took place today, at Wetherby Parish Church, of Mr. Dudley G. Harrison, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. George H. Harrison, of Rydal Bank, Roundhay, Leeds, and Miss Marguerite Thornton, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Thornton, of Brentwood, Wetherby (late of Dewsbury).
Miss Thornton is the lady captain of the Wetherby Golf Club, and Mr. Harrison is associated with the firm of George H. Harrison and Sons, colour printers, of Leeds and London.
The service was choral, and the Rev. G. T. Shettle, vicar of Hunsingore, officiated.
The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a close-fitting gown of cream satin, with an antique Limerick lace veil held in place by clusters of jessamine and myrtle, and carried Harrisii lilies.
Miss Doris Knowles and Miss Anne Himsworth (cousins of the bride), and Miss Dorothea Harrison and Miss Cynthia Harrison (sisters of the bridegroom), attended her in blue taffeta with net puff sleeves, and gold tissue caps, trimmed with rosebuds. They carried bouquets of roses.
There were two child attendants – Master Geoffrey George Russell Harrison and Miss Diana Cynthia Harrison, nephew and niece of the bridegroom. Mr. Leonard Harrison, of Newcastle, was the best man, supported by three groomsmen, Mr. Robert Thornton, Mr. Leslie E. Booth and Mr. A. Gordon McCandlish.
A reception was held at Brentwood, Wetherby, after which the couple left for a motoring tour in the South of England.

Black Sheep Sunday – Amos Clarkson

Amos Clarkson is the husband of my 5th cousin, Phyllis Wilson.

Phyllis was born on 23 March 1911 at Keighley, West Yorkshire. Her parents are Herbert Morris Wilson and Gerty Smith. Our common ancestors are Patrick Tattersall and Mary Gordon – my 4x great grandparents.

Amos was born on 23 March 1908 in Silsden, West Yorkshire.

On 22 April 1933 Amos and Phyllis married at the Parish Church in Silsden. At the time of their marriage Amos was a Police Constable and living at Taylor Street, Batley, West Yorkshire.

Unfortunately Amos found himself in trouble and in prison in 1947. The story was covered in the Daily Mirror on Friday 28 February 1947 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Amos Clarkson - Daily Mirror 28 February 1947.png

11-inch footprint clue puts P.C. in gaol for 3 years

A Policeman with footprints eleven inches long and a stride of twenty-eight inches, is to serve three years’ penal servitude.
He is Police-Constable Amos Clarkson, 38, of the West Riding Constabulary, who lives at Halifax Road, Hightown, Liversedge, Yorks, and sentence was passed on him at Leeds yesterday.
Footprints with diamond hallmarks, found inside the shop from which £25 10s. was stolen, coincided with Clarkson’s, it was stated.
Thirteen days after a robbery in a baker’s shop, police hid in it and were there when Clarkson entered. He ran away when taken in custody.

“I Lost My Head”
Clarkson told the Judge he was not near the shop on the night of the theft. “I lost my head.” he said, when asked why he ran away.
Passing sentence, the Judge said he was painfully conscious of the disaster the verdict meant to Clarkson and his wife and family, but it was impossible for him to take a lenient view.
Clarkson’s wife was carried screaming from the court.

Sunday’s Obituary – John Espley (1869-1945)

John Espley is my wife’s 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Joseph Booth Espley and Christiana Boyle. Their common ancestor is Martha Espley – my wife’s 2x great grandmother.

John was born on 5 May 1869 in Macclesfield, Cheshire.

In the 1891 census John was with his uncle & aunt Frederick Espley and Frances Espley in Biddulph, Staffordshire. He was working as an iron turner. By the time of the following census in 1901 John was living in Burnley, Lancashire working as a builders labourer.

On 7 December 1901 John married Sarah Booth at St Matthew the Apostle church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

Sarah was a young widow of 25. Her maiden name was Sarah Baines Turner. She had married Samuel Booth in the first quarter of 1897 in Burnley. Samuel died three years later. This left Sarah on her own with three children under three years old – Betty, Jane and Samuel.

By the time of the 1911 census John and Sarah had six children of their own but sadly two died in infancy. By now John was working in the water department of the Burnley Borough Council.

John was a conscientious employee for the water department and eventually retired from there in 1934. The Burnley Express of Saturday 5 May 1934 reported on his retirement (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

John Espley - Burnley Express 5 May 1934.png

THIRTY-THREE YEARS WITH WATER DEPARTMENT

After completing 33 years service with the Burnley Corporation Water Department, Mr. John Espley, of 14 Hawk Street, enters into a well-earned retirement today. Mr. Espley, who is 65 years of age, has served under three managers, and for over 20 years has been a foreman with the department.
He holds the proud record of never having been late for 32 years. One day, when he had been with the department about 12 months, he arrived five minutes late and was sent home for three days. He has never been late since! Mr. Espley is interested in gardening, with which he occupies much of his spare time.

John’s retirement lasted for eleven years before he died on 4 June 1945. He was buried three days later in Burnley cemetery.

The Burnley Express reported on his death on Saturday 9 June 1945.

John Espley - Burnley Express 9 June 1945.png

MR. JOHN ESPLEY

The death of Mr. John Espley (76) took place at his home, 81 Albert Street, Burnley, on Monday, after a short illness. Mr. Espley, a well-known Fulledge resident, was employed by the Burnley Corporation Water Department for about 33 years, being a foreman for about 20 years. He retired about 11 years ago. The funeral took place at the Burnley Cemetery on Thursday, preceded by a service in the Latter Day Saints’ Chapel, Rosegrove, with which he was connected. Elder John R. Moore and Elder W. Duckworth officiated. Arrangements: Mr. Joseph Harling, 29 Yorkshire Street.

Sarah lived for a further 13 months – she was buried on 29 July 1946 in Burnley Cemetery.