Month: July 2019

Workday Wednesday – George Robert Newman (1881-1977)

Eva Gawthrop is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are John Thomas Gawthrop and Annie Elizabeth Salisbury. Our common ancestors are John Gawthrop and Sarah Brown – my 4x great grandparents.

Eva was born on 9 May 1899 in Barrow in Furness, Lancashire.

In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2, Eva was living with her sister May Kirkby and family at Holker Street, Barrow in Furness. Eva was working as an “engine tracer (shipping)”. I had to look up the occupation to find out a bit more. The job involved tracing plans for the navy ships which were drawn up by the draughtsmen then photographed onto blueprints for building them. You had to be very accurate as you weren’t allowed to rub out any mistakes. You had a long period of training and supervision (a three year apprenticeship) and a great deal of practice before being allowed to work unsupervised.

Sometime in the March quarter of 1950 Eva married George Robert Newman in Barrow in Furness.

George Robert was a widower. He was born in 1881 and had married Nellie Key in 1908. They had one son, Leslie born in 1914. Nellie died at the age of 66 on18 January 1949.

So Eva and George Robert were a mature couple when they married. In fact George Robert had a long career as a Police officer in Hull, Yorkshire. At the time of his marriage to Eva her had been retired for almost 17 years. I found the following article in the Hull Daily Mail of Thursday 31 August 1933 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Hull Daily Mail - 31 Aug 1933.png

LEAVING HULL POLICE

Officer Who Served in Every Division

Today Hull bids an official farewell to one of its police chiefs, Superintendent George Robert Newman, who has been in the Force for nearly 29 years, and now retires on pension.
Mr Newman can lay claim to having served in each of the police divisions of the city at least once, and in some twice. Further, he has served under four Chief Constables: Major P. Malcolm, Mr George Morley, the late Captain Woods, and the present Chief Constable, Mr T. E. Howden.
Superintendent Newman joined the force in November, 1904, and after being at Wincolmlee station for about two years he was transferred to the Fire Brigade station. Here he remained for 14 years. In 1921 he was promoted to sergeant and transferred to the Central Division as a section sergeant.
In 1923 he again received promotion, this time to station sergeant, and took up duty at Norfolk Street station until 1925, when he was made an inspector and transferred to Wincolmlee. After a year he was again moved to the Central Station, remaining for two years.

IN CHARGE OF DIVISION
In 1928 he was raised to the rank of Chief Inspector, and was placed in charge of Crowle Street until 1929. He was then moved to Gordon Street, and placed in charge of the division. In the same year Mr Newman was appointed as Superintendent, and remained in charge of West Hull until his retirement.
Actually Superintendent Newman has served for 28 years and 9 months. During the past three years he has undertaken prosecutions for the police twice per week.
He is president of the International Police Association and the Police Temperance Society, while he is also interested in the Temporary Home for young people in Hull.
Mr Newman, who has earned the respect of everyone except lawbreakers, will remain in Hull after his retirement.

George Robert passed away at the age of 96 on 15 November 1977. Eva died 15 months later on 21 February 1979 at the age of 79.

Sunday’s Obituary – Alfred Chadwick (1871-1874)

Alfred Chadwick is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. His parents are Benjamin Towler Chadwick and Susannah Jane Lister. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff (my 4x great grandparents).

Alfred’s mother, Susannah, is my 1st cousin 4x removed. She was born in Burnley, Lancashire sometime in the March quarter of 1849 to parents Richard Lister and Jane Stowell.

In the 1861 census Susannah and her sister Mary Ellen were pupils at the Servants School in Casterton, near Kendal, Westmorland. Perhaps being trained for a life in service. That sort of life didn’t happen for Susannah, but I’m not sure the alternative was much better for her.

On 11 October 1868 Susannah married Benjamin Towler Chadwick at St James church, Burnley. As far as I can tell they had six children – but sadly four of them died in infancy, including Alfred.

The following article is from the Burnley Gazette of 2 January 1875 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Alfred Chadwick - Burnley Gazette 2 Jan 1875.png

A CHILD BURNED TO DEATH – An inquest was held at the Borough Hotel, Burnley, on Saturday morning, before Mr. H. U. Hargreaves, coroner, on the body of Alfred Chadwick, a boy aged 31/2 years, who died on Friday last from the effects of burns which he received on Wednesday the 23rd instant. — Susannah Jane Chadwick, wife of Benjamin Chadwick, of Piccadilly Road, said her husband was a lawyer’s clerk. The deceased was her son, and was burnt on Wednesday, the 23rd instant., about ten minutes to two o’clock. Witness had left the boy in the back kitchen, where she had lighted a fire for the use of a washerwoman, and had not been out of the place above a minute when she heard a scream; and on going to see what it was she found the boy lying on his face and his pinafore on fire. She had previously placed some clothes on a clothes “horse” in front of the fire, but they were not touched by the fire, and the boy had crept underneath. She wrapped a sheet around him immediately and put the fire out. The boy told her that his brother, who was in the kitchen with him, had given him a stick, and that he had gone underneath the “winter-hedge” and put it into the fire. The brother, who was a little older, told his mother that he did not notice the deceased to be on fire until he screamed, and then he called out to his mother. The elder brother denied having given deceased a stick. The deceased was burnt on the face, left arm, and knees, and his death occurred on Friday morning between seven and eight o’clock. — Dr. Smithwaite attended the deceased. —The jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased was accidentally burned to death.

This must surely have been a terrible time for the whole family.

Susannah then died at the relatively young age of 41 on 23 May 1890 and I do wonder whether she ever got over the tragic death of Alfred.

Sunday’s Obituary – Dorothy Pickles (nee Hutchinson) 1864-1942

Dorothy Pickles (nee Hutchinson) is the wife of Frederick Pickles – my 2nd cousin 3x removed.

Frederick was born on 2 January 1863 in Cowling, West Yorkshire, to parents John Pickles and Elizabeth Dawson. Our common ancestors are John Dawson and Ann Watson (my 4x great grandparents).

Frederick Pickles and Dorothy Hutchinson married on 6 November 1886 at Holy Trinity church, Cowling. They had two children:-

Norman Edward – born 21 December 1891
Edith May – born 4 November 1895

In the 1911 census Dorothy was described as a “baker and confectioner”. She carried on this business for many years.

Frederick died on 3 August 1918 at the age of 55. He was buried at Holy Trinity, Cowling five days later.

Dorothy lived for a further 24 years until her death on 24 August 1942. She too was buried at Holy Trinity, on 27 August 1942.

The Barnoldswick and Earby Times reported Dorothy’s passing on Friday 28 August 1942 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Death of Mrs. Dorothy Pickles
Much regret has been expressed in the village at the death, which took place suddenly on Monday morning, of Mrs Dorothy Pickles, of Queen Street, Cowling. The deceased lady was 77 years of age, and she had carried on business as a baker and confectioner in Queen Street Dining Rooms for many years. On Monday morning she was following her usual business when she collapsed and died. She was a member of the well-known Cowling family of Hutchinson, who had occupied Fold Farm, Cowling, for many years. She was one of eleven children, and the eldest of seven daughters. Actively interested in the Methodist cause throughout her life, she was associated with the Walton Street Methodist Church. She was also an advocate of the Liberal cause and was a member of the Women’s Liberal Association. Her late husband, Mr. Fred Pickles, who died 24 years ago, was a well-known musician, being an organist and a pianist of some repute. The funeral took place yesterday and the Rev. S. P. Hadley conducted a service at the house and the Rev. E. Betenson performed the last rites at the Cowling Parish Church, where the interment took place. Mrs. Pickles is survived by one son and one daughter, these being Mr. Norman Pickles, of Sutton, and Mrs. Harry Dracup, of Keighley.

In her will Dorothy left effects totalling £1261 3s 2d to her son Norman Edward Pickles and to her daughter Edith May Dracup and her son-in-law Harry Dracup.

Sunday’s Obituary – Hartley Greenwood (1878-1932)

Hartley Greenwood is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Town Greenwood and Sarah Buckley. Our common ancestors are Thomas Buckley and Henrietta Mason (my 3x great grandparents).

Hartley was born in Keighley, West Yorkshire sometime in the June quarter of 1878.

On Christmas Eve 1902 Hartley married Rosetta Green at St. Peter’s church, Keighley. One of the witnesses was Hartley’s sister, Mary Alice.

I haven’t been able to find Hartley and Rosetta on the 1911 census.

So the next time I come across them is a newspaper report in the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer of Saturday 21 May 1932. This is a report of an inquest (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Hartley Greenwood - Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer 21 May 1932.png

FATAL BLOOD CLOT

Keighley Man’s Bus Journey with Broken Leg

At the adjourned inquest yesterday on Hartley Greenwood (53), textile fitter, of Aspley Street, Keighley, who died in hospital on March 30, P.C. Heaton, of the Bradford City Police, stated that on March 23 he saw Greenwood sitting on the causeway. Greenwood said he had been accidentally kicked by another man while boarding a tramcar, and could not stand. Witness took him to the Bradford Royal Infirmary, and, after he had received treatment, put him on a bus for Keighley. Greenwood, added witness, said he would be all right if he were put on the bus. There was no mention of Greenwood’s leg being broke.
The widow, Rosetta Greenwood, said in her opinion her husband should have been brought by ambulance from Bradford, adding: “I don’t think it is right to send a man out like that with a broken leg. He looked terrible when brought home from the bus stand.”
Dr. J. Prentice said he saw Greenwood, at his home, the same night. He was satisfied that Greenwood’s left leg was broken, and the next day ordered his removal to the Keighley hospital. If there was a great deal of swelling it was very difficult to tell if a bone was broken. In his opinion, however, the movement from Bradford would not cause the blood clot, which was set up by the fracture, and which was the cause of death.
A verdict in accordance with medical evidence was returned, the jury adding a rider that in their opinion Greenwood should have been sent home from Bradford in the ambulance, and should not have been allowed to travel by bus.

Hartley was buried on 2 April 1932 at St. John’s church, Ingrow with Hainworth, Keighley.

In the 1939 Register (taken at the outbreak of WW2) Rosetta is living with Hartley’s sister, Selina Elizabeth, at Prospect Place, Keighley.

About two years later Rosetta married Henry Hensman sometime in the September quarter of 1941. Henry was recently widowed and was about nine years older than Rosetta.

They were married for about 22 years before Henry died on 10 February 1963. Rosetta lived for another five years, passing away on 10 June 1968.

Wedding Wednesday – William Turner and Hilda Mallalieu

William Turner is my 1st cousin 2x removed. His parents are Alexander Turner and Jane Alice Brotherton. Our common ancestors are Thomas Turner and Mary Jane Carradice – my 2x great grandparents.

William was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire – his birth is registered in the September quarter of 1912.

William was on active service in WW2 and spent a number of years as a prisoner of war.

On 24 March 1951 William married Hilda Mallalieu at St. James’s Church, Clitheroe. The wedding was announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on Friday 30 March 1951 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Turner & Hilda Mallalieu - CAT 30 March 1951.png

TURNER – MALLALIEU

At St. James’s Church, Clitheroe, on Saturday, the marriage took place of Mr. William Turner, fourth son of Mrs. J. A. Turner, of 20 Whipp Avenue, Clitheroe, and Mrs. Hilda Mallalieu, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. Kenyon, 9 Lower Antley Street, Accrington.
The ceremony was performed by the Rev. A. Lord, rector, and the hymns “Lead Us Heavenly Father” and “O Perfect Love” were sung. Mr. G. Hitchen being organist.
Given away by her father, the bride wore a grey coat with hat to match and carried a bouquet of carnations.
Mr. C. A. Hall was best man and Messrs. G. Turner and H. Turner were groomsmen.
The reception was held at the Craven Heifer Hotel, Whalley Road. Mr. and Mrs. Turner are to reside at 15 Wilson Street, Clitheroe.
Wedding gifts included cheques from the Committee and members of the Clitheroe Central Working Men’s Club and from the staff and employees at the North Western Electricity Board.

Military Monday – Joseph Thomas Greenwood (1906-1945)

Joseph Thomas Greenwood is my 3rd cousin 2x removed. His parents are Watson Greenwood and Margaret Alice Gawthrop. Our common ancestors are John Gawthrop and Sarah Brown (my 4x great grandparents).

Joseph was born on 28 March 1906 in Keighley, West Yorkshire. He was the third of five sons for Watson and Margaret. The others were:-

John Willie – 5 April 1898
Sydney – 26 May 1901
Ernest Pickles – 1 August 1907
Fred – 12 February 1909

At some point, I believe in the early 1930’s Watson and Margaret moved to Kent together with some of the boys. In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2 Watson is listed as a “poultry farmer”. The only son still at home was Fred – he was a soldier, home on leave.

Joseph married Dorothy Edna Clarke sometime in the June quarter of 1935. In the 1939 Register Joseph is listed as a “milk roundsman”.

I recently discovered that Joseph was a Corporal with Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. His service number was 1274826. I don’t have any other information about his war service.

While trying to fill in some gaps in my family history tree I cam across the following brief newspaper story from the Nottingham Journal of Thursday 8 November 1945 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Joseph Thomas Greenwood - Nottingham Journal 8 Nov 1945.png

On his first day back at work after demobilisation from the R.A.F., Joseph Thomas Greenwood (39), married, of Ashford, Kent, collapsed at the wheel of his bus on Wednesday and died within a few moments.

Joseph has an entry on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWG) website. This tells me that he is buried at Charing (Kent County) Crematorium and commemorated on the WW2 memorial there.

In 1950 Dorothy married Leslie John Ronald Potticary in Aldershot, Hampshire.

Black Sheep Sunday – Herbert John Croft (1898-1961)

Herbert John Croft is the husband of my 2nd cousin 2x removed, Agnes Ann Ainsworth.

Agnes was born on 23 September 1898 in Kendal, Westmorland. Her parents are Ralph Ainsworth and Margaret Ann Louisa Birkett. Our common ancestors are John Carradice and Ann Ridley – my 3x great grandparents.

Herbert was born on 7 June 1898, also in Kendal.

When WW1 broke out Herbert enlisted for service with the King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment on 28 July 1915. His regimental service number was 19829. His attestation papers show his age as 19 – in fact Herbert would not even be 17 for another two months.

However in just over 12 months Herbert was discharged as being “physically unfit” for service. He attended a medical board on 1 August 1916 and it is reported that around three years earlier he had been in hospital in connection with a heart problem and that since then he had “never had good health or felt perfectly well”. As a result he was finally discharged from military service on 15 August 1916.

About five years later Herbert married Agnes Ann Ainsworth – the marriage is registered in the second quarter of 1921 in Kendal.

Over the next 12 years Herbert seems to have had some “issues”. He appears in the Lancashire Evening Post at least three times (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

27 August 1921

Herbert John Croft - Lancashire Evening Post 27 August 1921.png

At Kendal, yesterday, Herbert John Croft, junr., was sentenced to one month’s imprisonment with hard labour for drawing out-of-work benefit whilst he was at work. He secured temporary employment to drive a motor ice-cream van, and whilst following that occupation went to the Kendal Labour Exchange and signed the register to the effect that he was out of work.

11 February 1933

Herbert John Croft - Lancashire Evening Post 11 February 1933

At Kendal, yesterday, Herbert John Croft, jun., motor engineer, a native of Kendal, of no fixed address, was remanded in custody until Monday on a charge of stealing an axe valued at 3s. 9d., the property of Messrs M. J. Croft and Son, Wildman Street, Kendal, the previous day.
The Chief Constable (Mr. P. O’Neill) objecting to bail, said there would probably be a more serious charge preferred against Croft.

I haven’t been able to find any other report relating to this offence.

10 June 1933

Herbert John Croft - Lancashire Evening Post - 10 Jun 1933.png

The story of a drunken man who threw a stone across the principal street in Kendal, striking the wall of a public house and narrowly missing women with babies in their arms, was told at Kendal yesterday, when Herbert John Croft, jun., aged 35 years, a Kendal engineer with no fixed address, was summoned for being drunk and disorderly at Highgate, Kendal, on Wednesday, June 7th. Defendant pleaded “Guilty.”
P.C. Marshall said he saw defendant throw the stone, and found two more in his pockets. When spoken to defendant said, “I know what I am doing.”
Defendant, who said he threw the stone at a man who had struck him, was fined £1.

The thing bothering me about the last two newspaper stories is the fact that Herbert is said to be of no fixed address. I’m left wondering what happened to his wife Agnes and their daughter Mavis Doreen who had been born in 1921.

In the 1939 Register (taken at the outbreak of WW2) Herbert is at 95 Windermere Road, Kendal. He is described as “married” and working as a “motor engineer”. In the same Register Agnes is with her parents at 30 Union Street, Kendal, together with her daughter Mavis.

So were Herbert and Agnes now living apart? Had they been separated since Herbert was described as of “no fixed address” six years earlier? Questions to which I am not going to get any answers now!

In some ways I feel sorry for Herbert. Perhaps being “physically unfit” had a serious impact on him. Or maybe he just made some wrong choices.