Month: May 2019

Tombstone Tuesday – Jim Hurtley (1886-1947) and Jessie Evangeline Hurtley (1885-1969)

Jim Hurtley is my grand uncle – in other words a brother of my grandmother. His parents are James Hurtley and Ellen Paley (my great grandparents).

I previously wrote about Jim’s service in WW1 here.

Jim was born on Boxing Day 1886 in Flasby, Yorkshire. He was the second child of James and Ellen and their first son.

Jessie Evangeline Leeming was born on 12 October 1885 in Leeds, West Yorkshire. Her parents are William Roger Leeming and Sarah Jane Thompson. As far as I can establish she was the second of nine children and the first daughter.

On 28 March 1910 Jim and Jessie married at St. John’s church, Cononley, Yorkshire. Over the next 14 years they had three children.

I recently visited St. John’s church in Cononley and photographed the headstone at the grave of Jim and Jessie.

Jim died on 4 December 1947 and Jessie on 11 July 1969.

Jim and Jessie Hurtley.jpeg

Sunday’s Obituary – Matthew Webster (1870-1946) and Robert Webster (1909-1946)

Matthew Webster is the husband of Betsy Paley – my great grand aunt. Her parents are James Paley and Mary Ann Spink – my 2x great grandparents.

Matthew was born on 19 February 1870 at Aysgarth, Yorkshire and Betsy was born on 19 December 1871 at Hetton, Yorkshire.

Betsy and Matthew married sometime in the second quarter of 1900 – the marriage is registered at Skipton, Yorkshire. Over the next ten years they had six children:-

Annie – 8 March 1901
James Paley – 16 April 1903
John – 1905 (died 1906)
Richard – 15 December 1906
Frank – 3 September 1909
Robert – 3 September 1909

Matthew was a farmer at Hazel Head Farm, Hawkswick, Skipton. In the 1939 Register (taken at the outbreak of WW2) Annie and Robert were still at home with their parents.

Betsy died on 3 June 1941.

Tragedy struck the family again at the end of February 1946. The youngest son Robert was injured in an accident on the farm and died a few days later at Whinfield Hospital, Skipton on 27 February at the age of 36. The very next day his father, Matthew, died.

Father and son were buried on 2 March 1946 at Arncliffe, Yorkshire. The Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer reported on their deaths on Friday 1 March 1946 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Matthew Webster - Yorkshire Post & Leeds Intelligencer 1 March 1946.png

The death took place yesterday of Mr. Matthew Webster, of Hazel Head, Hawkswick, Skipton, which he had farmed since 1901. His death, in his 77th year, followed the death of his son, Mr. Robert Webster, in Skipton and District Hospital on Wednesday. Mr. Robert Webster last week-end fell on a hay fork when working on a hay mow at the farm. Father and son will be buried together at Arncliffe Cemetery, tomorrow.

Sunday’s Obituary – Horatio Andrew Louis Smith (1869-1941)

Horatio Andrew Louis Smith is the husband of my wife’s 1st cousin 2x removed, Bertha Espley.

Bertha was born on 4 April 1872 in Congleton, Cheshire. Her parents are Richard Booth Espley and Sarah Jones. Bertha and my wife share ancestry with Martha Espley – my wife’s 2x great grandmother.

Horatio was born on 2 April 1869 in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales. By the time of the 1871 census Horatio had moved to Nottingham with his family.

On 26 December 1896 Horatio and Bertha married at All Saints Church, Nottingham.

Over the next 40 or so years Horatio worked as a commercial traveller. He died on 10 November 1941 at Basford Hospital, Nottingham. The Nottingham Journal of Friday 14 November 1941 published an obituary (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Horatio Andrew Louis Smith - Nottingham Journal 14 November 1941.png

REDHILL FUNERAL

The funeral took place yesterday at Redhill Cemetery, of Mr. Horatio Andrew Smith, of 5 Greys Road, Woodthorpe, who died on Monday at the age of 72.
In his young days Mr. Smith was a playing member of the Nottingham Forest Football Club. He was also a member of the Notts. Amateur Boxing and Notts. Swimming Clubs, and well-known in amateur billiards circles.
In his later years he took a keen interest in the Nottingham Institutes movement, being associated with the Mapperley Institute.
Mr. Smith was an old Nottingham High School boy.
He leaves a widow, three sons and one daughter.

A Right Royal Occasion – Florence Neale (nee Neville)

Florence Neville is my wife’s 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Charles Neville and Sarah Jane Espley. Their common ancestors are James Espley and Martha Silvester – my wife’s 3x great grandparents.

Florence was born on 26 October 1905 in Lichfield, Staffordshire.

In the 1911 census Florence is living at 126 Sandford Street, Lichfield. She married Philip James Neale sometime in the September quarter of 1931.

When the 1939 Register was taken, at the outbreak of WW2, Florence and Philip are living at 165 Lower Sandford Street. About sixteen years later they took over running the Queens Head pub also on Sandford Street.

During all this time Florence was a true Royalist – and very proud of it. So much so that her devotion to the Royal Family was reported in the local newspapers a couple of times.

The Lichfield Mercury of Friday 20 August 1982 recalls the visit by the Queen Mother to Lichfield in July 1942 (images from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Florence Neale (nee Neville) - Lichfield Mercury 20 August 1982.png

Forty years on – but Florence remembers

ROYALIST and proud of it – that’s Florence Neale, landlady of the Queen’s Head pub in Lichfield.
And Florence has proof of her devotion hanging in the lounge bar of the pub – a photograph of herself and her 15-month-old daughter Linda taken with the Queen Mother 40 years ago.
Florence, now 76, waited with the crowds outside Lichfield Cathedral during a Royal visit in 1942.
And now a grown-up Linda and her mum give the photograph pride of place beside other portraits of the Queen.

SPEAKING

‘I can remember leaving Linda’s pram near Stowe Pool and walking the rest of the way. We didn’t have to wait long to see her and the next thing I knew she was speaking to us!”

“She was beautiful,” Mrs. Neale added. “The photograph was taken by the Mercury, where I ordered my copy. But this framed picture was bequested to me in a friend’s will.”

Seven years later on Friday 21 April 1989 the Lichfield Mercury reported on the latest visit of the Queen Mother to the city – incidentally 21 April is the birthday of Queen Elizabeth II.

Florence Neale (nee Neville) - Licfield Mercury 21 April 1989.png

Family Favourite

A Lichfield family that first met the Queen Mother 47 years ago was given VIP treatment for the Royal visit.
Florence Neale, her daughter and son-in-law Linda and Richard MacCormack, other daughter Cynthia McDonald and sister Susan James were all allocated special tickets for the Cathedral service so that they could be presented to the Queen Mother.
The meeting was arranged after Mr. MacCormack wrote to Clarence House telling how his wife, then just 15 months old, and her family had been singled out from the crowd by the Queen Mother during her first visit to the city in 1942. Accompanying King George VI, the then Queen Elizabeth had approached Mrs. Neale outside the Cathedral to comment on her beautiful curly haired baby daughter.
The moment was captured by a Mercury photographer and Mr. MacCormack, landlord of the Queen’s Head pub, in Lichfield, enclosed the old press cuttings with his letter to London asking if the family could meet the Queen Mother again.
“We wondered if we would even get a reply and we never thought she would stop to speak to us.” said Mr. MacCormack afterwards.
But at the start of the Cathedral service, the family was ushered to one side to be presented to the Queen Mother. And Mr. MaCormack was able to show the Royal visitor the treasured framed photograph of the first meeting, which now hangs proudly in the lounge of the pub, pointing out the family.
“It was wonderful, I was filled with emotion.” said Mrs. Neale, who gave the Queen Mother a posy of roses and spring flowers. “She thanked me and said what lovely memories she had of Lichfield.”
After the meeting the Queen Mother’s Private Secretary Sir Martin Gilliat came over to the family to reveal that Her Majesty had recalled the wartime visit while looking at the Mercury cuttings during her helicopter flight to the city.

What a smashing story and lovely memories for the family.

Wedding Wednesday – John Stuart Tomkins and Ruth Margaret Bentley

Ruth Margaret Bentley is my 2nd cousin. Her parents are Albert Bentley and Ruth Halstead. Our common ancestors are Thomas Musgrove and Ellen Stowell – my great grandparents.

Ruth was born on 13 July 1934 in Clitheroe, Lancashire. Very sadly Ruth’s father, Albert, died at the age of 28 on 6 June 1937, when Ruth was one month away from her third birthday.

On 15 September 1956 Ruth married John Stuart Tomkins at Moor Lane Methodist Church, Clitheroe. The Clitheroe Advertiser and Times reported the wedding on Friday 21 September 1956 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

John S Tomkins & Ruth M Bentley - CAT 21 September 1956.png

TOMKINS – BENTLEY

The wedding took place at Moor Lane Methodist Church, Clitheroe, on Saturday, of Mr. John Stuart Tomkins, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Tomkins, of ‘Quarry Bank,” Lower Abbott’s Brow, Mellor, near Blackburn, and formerly of Waddington, and Miss Ruth Margaret Bentley, daughter of Mrs. and the late Mr. A. Bentley, of 1 Curzon Street, Clitheroe.
Given away by her uncle, Mr. Gordon Bentley, the bride wore a gown of ivory satin brocade with a short circular veil of embroidered net surmounted by a pearl and floral headdress. Her bouquet was of red roses.
Miss Christine Bentley, cousin of the bride, and Miss Marie Jackson, a friend, were the bridesmaids. They wore full-length dresses of pale blue brocade and wreaths of pink roses on their heads and carried matching bouquets.
Mr. Luke Porter, a friend of the bridegroom, was best man, and the duties of groomsman were shared by Messrs. Tom Hunt, H. T. Proctor, and John Howard.
During the ceremony which was performed by the Rev. G. H. Fenton, the hymns “The Lord’s My Shepherd” and “O Perfect Love” were sung. Mr. Donald Hartley was at the organ.
After a reception at the Starkie Arms Hotel, Clitheroe, the couple left for a honeymoon in London, the bride travelling in a tweed coat with red dress, handbag and shoes.
Among the gifts were a cheque from the bridegroom’s colleagues at Brockhall Hospital and a hand-embroidered tablecloth from the bride’s workfriends at the Brockhall staff school.
Mr. and Mrs. Tomkins will make their home at “Quarry Bank,” Lower Abbott’s Brow, Mellor.

Like her father, Ruth also died at a young age. She passed away on 28 December 1969 at only 35 years old. I posted a photograph of her tombstone here.

Military Monday – Walter Paley (1896-1918) and Lawrence Paley (1898-1918)

This is primarily the story of two brothers born about 18 months apart and died within two days of each other but also of what happened to the rest of the family.

John Robert Paley is my 1st cousin 3x removed. His parents are Thomas Paley and Harriet Richmond. Our common ancestors are William Paley and Mary Blackey (my 3x great grandparents).

On 26 September 1894 John Robert married Annie Simpson at All Saints Church, Otley, West Yorkshire. By the time of the 1901 Census they had two sons who would be my 2nd cousins 2x removed:-

Walter – born in 1896 and baptised on 19 July 1896 at St John’s Church, Moor Allerton, Leeds, West Yorkshire

Lawrence – born in 1898 and baptised on 5 February 1898 also at St John’s Church, Moor Allerton.

St John's Church - Moor Allerton

St John’s Church – Moor Allerton

In the 1911 census John Robert was working as a domestic gardener, Walter was a caddie at Alwoodley Golf Course and Lawrence was still at school.

When the First World War came both sons signed up for service.

Walter – married Matilda Lois Price at St Edmund’s Church, Roundhay, Leeds, sometime in the June quarter of 1916. I’m not sure whether this was before or after he began his military service.

His military service number was 205927. He served as a Private in the 87th Training Reserve Battalion before being transferred to the 477th Agricultural Company Labour Corps.

Walter died of wounds on 25 March 1918 – his death is registered at Stamford, Lincolnshire. Presumably that was the nearest Registration District to wherever he died. He is buried at St John’s Church, Moor Allerton. There are a total of eleven casualties buried at the cemetery from both WW1 and WW2.

He is also commemorated on the WW1 Cross at Moor Allerton.

At the time of his death Walter had £5 16s 5d credit in his service account (see image from Army Register of Soldiers’ Effects below from http://www.ancestry.co.uk). This money was paid to his widow Matilda in September 1918. Followed on 19 November 1919 by a further payment of £3 War Gratuity.

Walter Paley - Effects.png

Lawrence – served as a Private in the 15th Battalion of the (Prince of Wales Own) West Yorkshire Regiment. His service number was 17/237.

I haven’t been able to find any service records for either brother. So all I know about Lawrence is that he was killed in action on 27 March 1918.

He is commemorated at the Arras Memorial in France. However I haven’t been able to find any details of a known grave for Lawrence. He is also commemorated on the WW1 Cross at Moor Allerton.

In the Army Register of Soldiers’ Effects (www.ancestry.co.uk) a sum of £27 0s 4d (which included a £19 War Gratuity was paid to his father on 29 December 1919. You can also see in the fifth column it says “death presumed”.

Lawrence Paley - Effects.png

Details of the pay rates for soldiers and War Gratuity can be found in these links.

Within 12 months their mother Annie was also dead – she passed away on 13 March 1919. All three are mentioned on the headstone below at St John’s Church.

Walter & Lawrence & Annie Paley

Walter’s widow, Matilda, married Arthur Mason sometime in the June quarter of 1927 – their marriage is registered at Caistor in Lincolnshire. As far as I can tell Matilda and Arthur Mason did not have any children. In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2 they are living in Blackwell, Derbyshire with Arthur described as a “railway goods guard”.

Arthur died on 13 October 1968 and Matilda on 28 June 1974. At the time of their deaths they were living at Keelby, Lincolnshire.

Walter and Lawrence’s father, John Robert, married Beatrice Bailes sometime in the September quarter of 1922. This marriage is registered in Leeds. They had five children:-

Harriet – 4 April 1921
Laurence – abt March 1923
John Robert – 7 May1925
James Edwin – 13 June 1928
Harry – 1 February 1930

So having lost one complete family all within 12 months John Robert had a second chance and his children this time lived fairly long lives.

John Robert died sometime in the June quarter of 1953 and Beatrice passed away on 12 October 1957 – she is also buried at St John’s Church.

Beatrice Paley.jpg

Beatric Paley – St John’s Church

Sunday’s Obituary – John Metcalfe Spink (1869-1938)

John Metcalfe Spink is my 1st cousin 3x removed. His parents are Joseph Spink and Isabella Hannah Metcalfe. Our common ancestors are John Spink and Sophia Shuttleworth Kitching – my 3x great grandparents.

John was born in early 1869 at Burnsall, Yorkshire. His baptism was on 16 February 1869 at neighbouring Conistone.

By 1891 John had moved to Garforth, near Leeds, West Yorkshire and was employed as a “butchers assistant”.

Sometime in the last quarter of 1897 he married Emma Barber – the marriage is registered at Tadcaster, Yorkshire.

In the 1901 census John and Emma and their son Jack are living at Manston Road, Barwick in Elmet, Yorkshire. John is now described as a “butcher”.

Ten years later and the family had moved to Newton on Rawcliffe, near Pickering, North Yorkshire. John was now an “innkeeper” at the Newton Inn.

From what I can tell John remained an innkeeper until his death on 3 May 1938 – when he died at the White Horse Hotel, Pickering, where he had been the proprietor for 25 years. Details of his death were announced in the Leeds Mercury on Wednesday 4 May 1938 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

John Metcalfe Spink - Leeds Mercury 4 May 1938.png

DEATH OF PICKERING LICENSEE

The death took place yesterday at the White Horse Hotel, Burgate, Pickering, of Mr. John Metcalfe Spink, who had been the proprietor for 25 years.
He settled in the Pickering district from Cross Gates, Leeds, where he had a butchering business in 1910, and was formerly licensee at the White Swan Hotel, Newton, Pickering.
Mr. Spink also dealt in cattle and sheep, and was widely known in the Whitby district. He was a keen all-round sportsman.

In his will John left effects valued at £433 7s 7d to his son Jack Beevors Spink.