Month: February 2019

Workday Wednesday – Warren John Bruce (1880-1964)

Warren John Bruce is the husband of my wife’s 2nd cousin 2x removed, Sarah Jane Espley. My wife and Sarah Jane share common ancestors in James Espley and Martha Silvester (my wife’s 3x great grandparents).

Warren was born on 5 February 1880 in Stockport, Cheshire. He started working for the Manchester Ship Canal company at the age of 14 in 1894. In the 1911 census his occupation is “chief clerk Manchester docks”.

In November 1938 Warren was promoted to Docks Manager from his position as Deputy Dock Manager. He remained in post until 1945 when he retired after 51 years service. His retirement was mentioned in the Manchester Evening News of 18 December 1945 (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Warren John Bruce - Manchester Evening News 18 December 1945.png

Manchester Evening News – British Newspaper Archives

Canal Docks Manager is Retiring

After 51 years’ service with the Manchester Ship Canal Mr. Warren J Bruce is retiring as docks manager. His service with the company began in 1894 – when the Canal was opened for through traffic to Manchester. He had been docks manager since November, 1938.

His successor, Mr H Oakley Smith, who was educated at Argyle House School, Sunderland, and HMS Worcester, served with the P and O Company until 1924, when he joined Lever Brothers Traffic Dept., and went to West Africa, ultimately becoming assistant to the Nigerian Traffic Manager.

Mr. Oakley Smith, who is a member of the Institute of Transport, Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, and an Associate of the Institute of Naval Architecture, was appointed assistant docks manager with the Manchester Ship Canal in 1940.

I also know from a report in the Lancashire Evening News of 26 October 1938 that Warren’s predecessor as Docks Manager, Mr F W Way, had been with the Manchester Ship Canal company for almost 50 years.

Clearly a company at that time which inspired people to stay with them for a long time.

Sunday’s Obituary – James Ambler Feather (1915-1952)

James Ambler Feather is my 4th cousin 1x removed. His parents are Arthur Feather and Sarah Ethel Ambler. Our common ancestors are Anthony Mason and Mary Brayshaw – my 4x great grandparents.

James was born on 26 August 1915 in Keighley, West Yorkshire.

In the 1939 Register, taken at the outbreak of WW2, James was living at Coleridge Place, Bradford, West Yorkshire. He was employed as a “textile engineer”.

Sometime afterwards James became a State Registered male nurse.

Tragically, James died on 19 November 1952. A report of his death was published in the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer on 20 November 1952 (image taken from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

James Ambler Feather - Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer 20 November 1952.png

Male nurse found dead in hotel

James Ambler Feather (36), of Lane Ends, Oakworth, near Keighley, who was reported missing from home earlier this week, has been found dead in a Salisbury hotel.
Feather, a State registered male nurse employed in Leeds, lived alone at Oakworth, where he was last seen on Sunday.

I suspect that there might have been an inquest, depending on the circumstances of his death. But I have not been able to find a report if there was.

Sunday’s Obituary – Frank Coulston (1945-1949)

Frank Coulston is my 4th cousin. His parents are George Edward Coulston and Janet Petty. Our common ancestors are Martin Gawthrop and Ann Kighley – my 3x great grandparents.

Frank was born sometime in the fourth quarter of 1945 and his birth is registered at Nelson in Lancashire.

Sadly Frank had a very short life as the result of a tragic accident. The Barnoldswick & Earby Times of 26 August 1949 reported on the inquest held on Tuesday 23 August (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Frank Coulston - Barnoldswick & Earby Times 26 August 1949.png

Boy Drowned in Lodge

CORONER’S APPRECIATION OF RESCUE EFFORTS

“He was only after tadpoles,” said Mr John Ingham, a witness at the inquest held in Colne Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday on Frank Coulston aged three, of 8 Beech Street, Colne, who was drowned in Castle Hill Lodge on Saturday morning. The East Lancashire Deputy Coroner, Mr R H Rowland, returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”
Mrs Janet Coulston, the boy’s mother, stated that she was in Stafford at the time of the accident and had left the child in the care of his grand-mother.
John Stanford Hall, aged eight, of 9 Maple Street, Colne, told the Coroner that he and his brother were playing with Frank Coulston on the bank of the lodge. “Frank was walking backwards and fell into the water,” he said. Witness added that he ran into a nearby garden for help.
John Ingham, 14 Spruce Street, Colne, told the Coroner that he heard Hall saying “Frank is in the lodge.”
The Coroner: What did you do?
Mr Ingham: I told the boy to run and tell someone, and I dashed straight there. Frank was floating in the water some distance from the side.
The Coroner: You jumped in with your clothes on and got him out? – Yes.
Were you out of your depth? – It was shallow near the bank, but I was out of my depth when I got to him.
In answer to further questions, Mr Ingham said that he tried artificial respiration on the boy, with no success, and later Mr Dennis Quinland who is a qualified ambulance man took over and tried to revive Coulston.
Dennis Quinland, of 43 Lenches Road, stated that there was every appearance that the boy was dead when he saw him.

NOT REGARDED AS TRESPASSING
Police Constable George Mills gave evidence that he arrived soon after Mr Quinland had begun artificial respiration. He said that the lodge was about a quarter of a mile from the boy’s home, and that it was easy to gain access to the water. Quite a number of children played near the lodge, and that was not regarded as trespassing.
Summing up, the Coroner said he was satisfied that the boy fell into the water accidentally, perhaps losing his balance when he was walking backwards. “There is no question of skylarking or of the action of any other person,” he added. “I would like to place on record my appreciation of Mr Ingham’s effort in jumping into the water fully clothed when he was clearly out of his depth. Everyone who has been connected with this accident has acted most creditably.” The Coroner commended John Hall for the way in which he had given evidence, and also mentioned a third person, Mr John Burnett, of 30 Regent Street, Nelson, who had tried to resuscitate the boy.
After the inquest Mrs Coulston asked the Coroner if the lodge could be made safe. The Coroner replied that he was not concerned with that aspect.
Mrs Coulston: Well, who is? Surely something can be done.
The Coroner: I have every sympathy with you, but after all it is your child and he was a quarter of a mile away from home.
Mr T S M Badgery on behalf of the owners of the lodge, also expressed his sympathy, saying that children occasionally got into mischief, often with tragic results.

In December 1949 John Ingham received the Royal Humane Society’s Honorary Testimonial for attempting to save Frank.

Wedding Wednesday – William Edward Easton & Dora Brown

William Edward Easton is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. He was was born on 5 May 1897 to parents Robert Fraser Easton and Christiana Astin. Our common ancestors are Robert Astin and Nancy Dyson my 3x great grandparents.

In the 1901 and 1911 census returns William and his parents and siblings lived in Berry Street, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

On the 4 July 1924 William married Dora Brown and a report of their wedding was in the Burnley Express the following day (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

William Easton & Dora Brown - Burnley Express 5 July 1924.png

INTERESTING BURNLEY WEDDING

The marriage took place at Holy Trinity Church yesterday, the Rev. W R Coombes officiating, of Mr. Wm. Edward Easton, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Fraser Easton, of Lansdowne Street, Burnley, to Miss Dora Brown, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A H Brown, of Padiham Road, Burnley. Both are members of well-known families, the bridegroom’s father being a director of the firm of Messrs. Wm. Easton, Sons and Co., Ltd., whilst the bride’s father is a well-known wholesale fish merchant. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a dress of white broche marocain trimmed with pearls, with hat to match, and carried a bouquet of white roses and lilies of the valley. Her chief bridesmaid, Miss Eleanor Wiggan wore a pale blue dress of watered moire, trimmed with silver, and hat to match, and the other bridesmaid, Miss Dorothy Easton (sister of the bridegroom) wore a dress of mauve crepe de Chine. Both bridesmaids carried bouquets of sweet peas.

The bridegroom was accompanied by Mr. Percy Brown (brother of the bride) as best man, and Mr. Sidney Smith (cousin of the bride) as groomsman. After the reception at the Empress Hotel, Mr. and Mrs. Easton went to the Isle of Man for their honeymoon.

Black Sheep Sunday – Hilda Maskell (nee Coulam)

Hilda Coulam is my wife’s 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are George Coulam and Sarah Ann Turner. Their common ancestors are James Padley and Sarah Bradshaw – my wife’s 3x great grandparents.

Hilda was born on 2 January 1911 at Tathwell, near Louth in Lincolnshire.

Sometime in the fourth quarter of 1932 Hilda married George Maskell – their marriage is registered in Louth.

Hilda appeared before Louth Borough Magistrates in July 1952 as reported in the Louth and North Lincolnshire Advertiser on 26 July (taken from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Hilda Maskell - Louth and North Lincolnshire Advertiser 26 July 1952.png

BOXED SCHOOL-BOY’S EARS

Louth Woman Bound Over By Court

While two children held him, a Louth woman hit a nine-year-old boy whom she thought had struck her own daughter with a cricket bat, it was alleged at Louth Borough Magistrates’ Court yesterday (Thursday). The woman, Mrs Hilda Maskell, of 31 Abbey Road, Louth, summoned for assaulting and battering the boy, was bound over to be of good behaviour for 12 months in the sum of £5.
The summons was preferred by Mrs Ellen Windle, mother of the boy, who was represented by Mr S Harmston. Capt. R H Helmer appeared for Mrs Maskell and entered a pleas of not guilty.
“This summons,” Mr Harmston told the Bench, “is brought to teach adults that they cannot take the law into their own hands and assault little children, whatever has happened.”

BOY’S STORY
Nine-year-old John Windle said that he left school on July 15th with Raymond Grebby, and added that he knew children named Ernie Taylor and Ingrid Spix.
“Mrs Maskell said something to them, and then Ingrid and Ernie came running after me and caught hold of me,” he alleged. “Mrs Maskell came and hit me on the face and then on the head. They held me while she hit me. She used a swear word to me.”
The boy added that he knew Maureen Maskell but said he had not hurt her at any time.
Mrs Maskell hit him four or five times on the face and then on the head. It hurt but he did not cry.
Answering Capt. Helmer, the boy said he had a cricket bat with him but denied hitting Maureen Maskell with it. He said he had never touched the girl and had not sworn at Mrs Maskell.

“GAVE HIM GOOD CLIP”
Sheila Addison (9), of 12 Abbey Road, Louth, said she saw the children holding John Windle. Mrs Maskell hit him four or five times while he was being held.
Raymond Grebby, 60 St Bernard’s Avenue, Louth, said he left school with John. He saw a boy hitting Maureen Maskell, but John did not hit her. He told Capt. Helmer that the boy who hit the girl also had a bat, as well as John. “John didn’t hit her because he was with me,” he said.
Mrs Dorothy Margaret Fieldsend, of 30 Abbey Road, Louth, appearing on subpoena, said she was looking out of her window when she saw children chasing John Windle. “The next thing I looked up and saw Mrs Maskell was giving him a good clip across the ear,” she added.
Mrs Ellen Windle, of 28 Broadley Crescent, the boy’s mother, said as she was going home Sheila Addison and Mrs Fieldsend spoke to her. When she got home she saw that John’s face was “all red, and so was his head.”
She told Capt. Helmer that she had had a complaint about John, who got blamed for a lot he did not do.The complaint had been made by Mr Maskell, witness told Mr Harmston.

“GIRL HIT WITH BAT”
First witness for the defence, Mrs Ethel May Willoughby, of 19 Abbey Road, Louth, said she was speaking to John Windle when three little girls came up. John chased them with a cricket bat – “a large one” – and hit Maureen with it. She ran off crying.
“I have no doubt he was the boy,” witness continued. “Mrs Maskell walked down the road, caught John and smacked his ears two or three times. “I should most probably have done the same thing had it been my little girl,” she added.
Mr Harmston: You don’t like John, do you? – I like all children.
Answer my question. You don’t like John? – There are a lot of children I’m not exactly fond of.
And John is one of them? – Yes.
Mrs Willoughby added that she had several times stopped other children hitting the boy.

“LAUGHED AT ME”
Mrs Hilda Maskell said that when Maureen arrived home she was crying. “I went up to John,” she said. “Two children were holding him. He had a cricket bat, and I boxed him on the ears and said “Perhaps that will teach you a lesson for the future.” He turned round and laughed at me.” The boy had previously used bad language, she alleged.
Mr Harmston: Did you see John hit Maureen? – No.
Did you ask John if he had hit Maureen? – No.
Did you think it right to hit this small boy while he was being held? – No, I don’t think so. I did it under very great stress.
Capt. Helmer, making his submission, commented: “Young people nowadays seem to imagine that they can behave as they like, and if anyone looks at them or touches them they can be summoned for assault.

CHAIRMAN’S ADVICE
“You have seen the little boy. All they want is a tinsel halo and a pair of wings to allow him to float away. We don’t hear of Master John crying after his ears are boxed, but we do know that the little girl was crying.”
But, added Capt. Helmer, there must be a technical offence. It might be a pity to take the law into one’s own hands, but if more people did so there would not be so much juvenile delinquency, he added.
After the Bench had retired the chairman, Ald. A E Maxey, pointed out to Mrs Windle that she had admitted that there had been a complaint against her son. “You must take the boy under hand and stop him.” he added.
The chairman told Mrs Maskell: “We find you guilty. You know you must not take the law into your own hands, however you feel about it. If everyone took notice of your advocate we should have the Court full every time.”
Mrs Maskell was then bound over and ordered to pay 4/- costs.

 

Black Sheep Sunday – Charles Cantwell & Edna May Cantwell (nee Buckley)

Edna May Buckley is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Ramsden Buckley and Emma Elliott. Our common ancestors are Thomas Buckley and Henrietta Mason – my 3x great grandparents.

Edna May was born in Keighley, West Yorkshire on 7 November 1904. She was the last of six children. In the 1911 census the family were living at 16 Hainworth Lane, Keighley.

Sometime in the second quarter of 1923 Edna May married Charles Cantwell. Charles was born on 8 August 1903 and was also from Keighley.

Before they were married Charles had been in trouble with the police more than once.

In 1918 he appeared in court along with four other young men. They were charged with stealing a cap and a pack of cards, valued at 3s 6d, from the Keighley Bowling Club on 13 December. All five pleaded guilty and Charles was fined ten shillings.

Less than three years into their marriage things were not going well. The following report is from the Leeds Mercury of 27 February 1926.

Charles Cantwell - Leeds Mercury 27 February 1926.png

KEIGHLEY: Red Hot Poker Attack

Alleged to have thrown hot tea over his wife, struck her with a red hot poker, blackened her eyes, and threatened her with a razor, Charles Cantwell, labourer, of Bogthorne, Oakworth, at Keighley yesterday was ordered to pay 20s a week on a separation order.

At the time of the 1939 Register in September that year Charles and Edna May are still together and living at 56 Woodhouse Grove, Keighley. Charles is working as a “scrap iron dealer”

Four and a half months later both Charles and Edna May appear in the Yorkshire Evening Post of 13 February 1940.

Charles Cantwell - YEP 13 February 1940.png

CHASE & FIGHT IN THE BLACKOUT

KEIGHLEY CONSTABLE COMMENDED

Gaol for Man who Stole from Cafe

Charles Cantwell (34), general dealer, Woodhouse Grove, Keighley, was sent to prison for a total of six months when he was charged at Keighley today with stealing knives and forks from Ramsden’s Cafe, and with assaulting Police constable Lodge in the execution of his duty.
His wife, Edna M Cantwell, who was also charged with the theft, was fined £1 in this case, and a further £1 on a charge of obstructing the police.
Richard A Robinson (28), hairdresser, Linnet Street, Keighley, was jointly charged with the theft, but the case against him was dismissed.
Defendants pleaded not guilty.
The Mayor asked that the work of Police constable Lodge in the case be brought to the notice of the proper authority.
Superintendent Atkinson said that about10.30pm on February 1 the defendants went to the cafe and had supper. When they left, a waitress missed three knives and forks, a sugar basin, and a bottle of tomato ketchup from the table. Police constable Lodge saw defendants leave the cafe. Hearing something rattling in Charles Cantwell’s pocket the officer asked him what he had there. Cantwell ran down High Street towards the cross.
Giving chase the officer caught Cantwell in Church Street, where, it was alleged, Cantwell took a bottle of ketchup from his raincoat pocket, struck the constable on the left arm with it, and then threw it away. There was a struggle and both fell. When they got up Cantwell took something else from his pocket and threw it away and the constable heard the sound of breaking crockery. Cantwell then struck and kicked the constable, causing him to lose his hold.
Again Cantwell bolted and again the constable caught him, this time in Low Street. There was another struggle and Mrs Cantwell pulled the constable’s cape over his head and tried to free her husband.
Eventually the constable managed to blow his whistle and it was not until then that Cantwell gave up struggling. The wife, it is alleged, was obstructing the constable all the way. Later a broken sugar basin, Cantwell’s hat, a fork, and a bottle of tomato ketchup were found in the street.
Police constable Lodge said Cantwell had some drink, but he was not drunk.
Answering Mr H Wall (Turner and Wall, Keighley), witness said it was possible that Cantwell might have got rid of the other forks during the chase.

Somebody’s “Joke”

Charles Cantwell told the bench that he was drunk at the time of the alleged offence. He put his raincoat over a chair in the cafe, but he put nothing into the pockets. He suggested that someone might have put the things in his pocket as a joke.
“As far as assaulting the officer goes, it was him that assaulted me,” added defendant.
Robinson said he had no knowledge of anything having been taken. He did not take anything.
Mrs Cantwell had nothing to say.

That is the last newspaper article I have been able to find about either Charles or Edna May. Perhaps six months in prison was the turning point and they had a trouble free existence after that.

Charles died on 22 January 1980 and left a will valued at £9641.

Edna May died on 1 May 1980 and she left a will valued at £15155.