Month: January 2019

Wedding Wednesday – Albert Bentley and Ruth Halstead

Ruth Halstead is my 1st cousin 1x removed. Our common ancestors are Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove and Ellen Stowell – my great grandparents.

Ruth married Albert Bentley on Wednesday 5 July 1933 at Moor Lane Methodist Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire. A report of the marriage was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on Friday 7 July (image from http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

Albert Bentley & Ruth Halstead - CAT 7 July 1933.png

BENTLEY – HALSTEAD

A large congregation of personal and other friends assembled in the Moor Lane Methodist Church on Wednesday afternoon to witness the wedding of Mr Albert Bentley, elder son of Mr and Mrs Arthur Bentley, of Moore Street, Burnley, and formerly of Barrow, to Miss Ruth Halstead, only daughter of Mr and Mrs Robert Halstead, of 1 Curzon Street, Clitheroe. The bride has been for some years a prominent member of the choir at Moor Lane and her services as a soprano soloist have been freely utilised by other churches and on the concert platform. She was also identified with the Parish Church Amateur Operatic Society. The bridegroom is well known in local cricket circles, having played in turn for Barrow, Whalley and Burnely St. Andrews.

Several fellow choristers of the bride were in the choir and led the singing of the hymn “Crown with Thy benediction.” The ceremony was performed by the Rev. P S Johnson, and the duties of organist were fulfilled by Mr G Cowgill.

The bride, who was given away by her father, looked becoming in a long ivory satin dress which had a yoke and puff sleeves of embroidered net, her veil, also of embroidered net, being crowned with a circlet of orange blossoms and pearls. Her bouquet was composed of pink roses.

Miss Bertha Procter was in attendance on her cousin, wearing an ankle length dress of yellow spun silk which had a cape collar, the skirt being relieved with narrow frills. A yellow crinoline hat trimmed with velvet ribbon, and a bouquet of mauve sweet peas, completed her toilette.

Mr Cyril S Aspden, of Colne, was the best man, and Messrs T R Halstead and G Steer the groomsmen.

A reception followed at the Starkie’s Arms Hotel. For the journey to Douglas, where the honeymoon is being spent, the bride travelled in a Lido blue silk dress and grey coat which had Lido blue revers, grey hat and shoes to tone. On their return Mr and Mrs Bentley are to reside at 9 Wellesley Street, Lowerhouse, Burnley. They were the recipients of numerous presents. The bridegroom’s gift to the bridesmaid was a wristlet watch.

Albert and Ruth had one daughter, Ruth Margaret Bentley on 13 July 1934.

I have previously written about Ruth and Albert here. And about Ruth Margaret here.

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Black Sheep Sunday – Warren Espley Bruce (1911-1982)

Warren Espley Bruce is my wife’s 3rd cousin 1x removed. He was born in Stockport, Cheshire on 19 June 1911 to parents Warren John Bruce and Sarah Jane Espley. Their common ancestors are James Espley and Martha Silvester, my wife’s 3x great grandparents.

Sometime in the September quarter of 1934 Warren married Mary Kitchen – the marriage is registered at Penrith, Cumberland.

In the 1939 Register Warren is shown as licensee at the Two Lions Hotel, Great Dockray, Penrith, Cumberland. It seems he remained there for a good number of years.

Unfortunately Warren was arrested for drunk driving in 1955 and the following report is from the Penrith Observer on 26 July 1955.

Warren Espley Bruce - Penrith Observer 26 July 1955.png

Penrith Observer from the British Newspaper Archive

Drove under influence – fined £50

A Penrith publican, Warren Espley Bruce (44), address given as the Two Lions Hotel, Great Dockray, was fined £50 and disqualified from driving for a year by Penrith Magistrates last week.

Bruce was charged with driving a car between Frenchfield Hill, Carleton and Great Dockray when under the influence of drink to such an extent as to be incapable of having proper control of the vehicle at 7.50pm on Thursday, June 30. He pleaded guilty.

Constable Peel said he saw a car coming towards him at a very fast speed up Frenchfield Hill. He turned round and followed it to the junction of Roper Street with Victoria Road where there was a halt sign. He saw Bruce, who was the driver had a flushed face, and smelt strongly of intoxicating liquor. His speech was slurred and he refused to get out of the car, and kept switching the engine on and off.

He then shot forward over the junction, causing a lorry to stop suddenly.

Constable Peel said he followed the car into Corn Market – where Bruce slowed up as though he did know which way to turn – and into Great Dockray, where he turned into the entrance of the Two Lions Hotel.

Bruce was unsteady on his feet and caught hold of the car for support, and when asked why he had driven away replied: “I got here all right didn’t I?”

CALL FOR ASSISTANCE

Told he would be arrested, Bruce said he would not, and made as though to get into the hotel. Constable Peel said he was obliged to restrain him and take him by the arm.

Bruce was put into the police car, but got out and made back into the hotel, but witness brought him back and wirelessed for assistance. “He was not violent, but just awkward,” said Constable Peel.

Bruce refused to be examined by a doctor at the police station, and said: “The car is in the yard. I have not killed anybody, have I?”

He called the police “Gestapo” and said “I will get you for this,” witness said.

For the defence, Mr C E Arnison, Penrith, said that Bruce’s car was 6ft 4in wide and that the entrance to the Two Lions yard was only 8ft wide. That left a total of only 21 inches, 10 and half on each side. A man could drive a vehicle through a narrow entrance like that had a good measure of control. What happened afterwards was another matter.

Bruce had the right to go for trial by jury at the next Cumberland Quarter Sessions if he wished, said Mr Arnison.

The opportunity was open to Bruce, but after giving careful consideration to the matter, he had decided to take his punishment that day.

MET R.A.F. COLLEAGUE

Mr Arnison referred to “a queer set of coincidences” that came into being during the afternoon of that day. Bruce had set off to visit his father at Hawes for a few days’ holiday, and when going through Warcop saw an old R.A.F. acquaintance he had not seen for three to four years.

He filled up with petrol at Warcop where the garage was part of the Chamley Arms, and then they had a lot to drink. There was no denying that, but Bruce was “not in bad clip afterwards.”

He realised he was under the influence of drink, and instead of driving the 26 miles to Hawes, he travelled the 16 miles back to Penrith, with the result that someone must have reported him for bad driving.

“EMOTIONALLY UPSET”

Bruce, said Mr Arnison, had got worked up into an excited state, and was more emotionally upset than alcoholically upset. He had been driving for 28 years, and had had no such charges against him before.

Joseph Hall, Beckside, Warcop, said Bruce had been in the R.A.F. with him. He saw him by accident in Warcop, and they went to have a drink. He had a bottle of beer and three rums, and Bruce drank whisky. He did not think Bruce was drunk at the time.

However it seems that Warren did not want to wait for his disqualification to run its course.

According to the Penrith Observer of 31 January 1956 Warren “made a successful application to have his licence restored”.

At the hearing Magistrates were told by Mr Arnison that:

He now applied for the removal of the disqualification. His father lived alone in Nicholson Lane, and in the last few years his health had deteriorated. It would be to his advantage if his son could take him up and down in his car.

Mr Arnison said Bruce’s only hobby was golf, and if he had to rely on public transport he could hardly get up to the golf course to have a game during the day. he also had business commitments up and down the country for which a car was most useful.

The police opposed the application with Superintendent H Graham saying “Bruce was quite unfit to be in charge of a car at the time of the offence. Suspension was the most serious part of the conviction”.

So a victory of sorts for Warren in the end – but not one I would be proud to boast about.

Sunday’s Obituary – Daniel John Burns (1897-1928)

Daniel John Burns is my wife’s 2nd cousin 1x removed. His birth is registered in the first quarter of 1897 in Glamorganshire, Wales. Daniel’s parents are Thomas Burns and Lucy Skelding. The family connection between Daniel and my wife is from William Skelding and Catherine Taylor – my wife’s 2x great grandparents.

Daniel appears in the 1901 and 1911 census returns in Llanbradach, Glamorganshire. He was the last of nine children born to Thomas and Lucy.

In 1911 at the age of 13 Daniel’s occupation as given in the census is “coal miner hewer”.

When WW1 started Daniel enlisted for service at Caerphilly on 11 December 1915. He was initially assigned to the Army Reserve with the 17th Lancers.

On 26 April 1918 Daniel had another medical examination and was subsequently transferred to the Tank Corps with a regimental service number of 313324 on 10 September 1918.

After the end of hostilities Daniel was transferred to Class Z Army Reserve on 16 January 1919. The Class Z Reserve was authorised by an Army Order of 3 December 1918. There were fears that Germany would not accept the terms of any peace treaty, and therefore the British Government decided it would be wise to be able to quickly recall trained men in the eventuality of the resumption of hostilities. Soldiers who were being demobilised, particularly those who had agreed to serve “for the duration”, were at first posted to Class Z. They returned to civilian life but with an obligation to return if called upon. The Z Reserve was abolished on 31 March 1920.

Within nine years Daniel would be dead.

As far as I can tell Daniel returned to the coal mines after the war. Sadly though, it appears he started to suffer with mental health issues and was admitted to the Angleton Asylum in Bridgend, Wales around May 1927.

The following article is from the Western Mail on 12 October 1928.

Daniel John Burns - Western Mail 12 October 1928.png

BRIDGEND PATIENTS ACT

The practice of allowing certain patients to be on parole without attendants was defended by Dr. McGregor, assistant medical officer at the Glamorgan County Medical Hospital, Bridgend, at the inquest at Bridgend on Thursday on Daniel John Burns (31), assistant haulier, Llanbradach, who threw himself under an omnibus.

Dr. McGregor explained that patients were only allowed to go out in this way when the medical staff were satisfied that their recovery was practically complete.

The Coroner said no criticism could be levelled at the institution.

The jury returned a verdict of “Suicide during temporary insanity” and exonerated the driver from blame.

Some of the other headlines reporting the events were not quite as moderate. For example the 

Belfast Telegraph said: LUNATIC JUMPS UNDER OMNIBUS

Northern Whig (County Antrim, Northern Ireland) said: LUNATIC JUMPS UNDER BUS

Hull Daily Mail  said: MENTAL PATIENT’S FATAL WALK

I’m left wondering whether it was the impact of war that caused Daniel’s ill health – probably something that wasn’t acknowledged then.

Wedding Wednesday – Harold Moor and Edna Proudfoot

Edna Proudfoot is my 3rd cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Arthur Proudfoot and Ellen Ann Myers. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane, my 3x great grandparents.

Edna was born on 26 October 1910 in Burnley, Lancashire.

On 25 April 1933 Edna married Harold Moor at St. Paul’s Church, Nelson, Lancashire – a report of the wedding was published in the Burnley Express the following day.

Harold Moor & Edna Proudfoot wedding.png

Considerable interest was evinced in a pretty wedding which took place yesterday afternoon, in St Paul’s Church, Nelson. The contracting parties were Mr Harold Moor, youngest son of Mr Harold Moor, of 1 Bank Hall Terrace, Burnley, a member of the firm of Messrs T and J Moor, wholesale fruiterers, of Nelson, and Miss Edna Proudfoot, eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs Proudfoot, of 146 Hibson Road, Nelson. The ceremony was performed, in the presence of a large congregation, by the Rev W M V Gregory.

The bride, who was given away by her father, was prettily attired in a gown of fine lace over crepe suede trimmed in silk velvet. She wore a veil with a wreath of orange blossom and carried a bouquet of lilac. The bridesmaids were Miss Mary Proudfoot, Miss Jean Proudfoot and Miss Nancy Proudfoot (sisters of the bride), and Miss Eleanor Dyson (friend of the bride). They were dressed in Parma violet crapple crepe marocain, with chenille berets to tone. Their bouquets were composed of anemones. The bride’s mother wore a brown and du Barry crapple crepe marocain, and Mrs E A Smalley, of Accrington, sister of the bridegroom, was attired in nigger brown floral crepe de Chine. Both had bouquets of tea roses.

The duties of best man were discharged by Mr A Veevers, friend of the bridegroom, and Mr T Greenwood (friend of the bridegroom) and Mr E A Smalley, of Accrington (brother-in-law of the bridegroom), officiated as groomsmen. After the ceremony a reception was held at Oddie’s Cafe, Scotland Road, Nelson.

The bridegroom is well known in local amateur football, playing centre-forward for the Burnley Grammar School Old Boys, of which team the best man is the captain.

The bride’s gift to the bridegroom was a gold wristlet watch, and the bridegroom’s gift to the bride was a pearl necklace. Diamante brilliant clips were presented by the bridegroom to the bridesmaids. Among the presents was a case of fish eaters and servers from the staff of Messrs T and J Moor.

The honeymoon is being spent touring in the South.

Sunday’s Obituary – George Dacre Crewdson (1890-1943)

Clara Shackleton is my 2nd cousin 2x removed. Her parents are James Shackleton and Mary Elizabeth Haworth. Our common ancestors are William Stowell and Ellen Lane – my 3x great grandparents.

Clara was born on 20 April 1900 and her birth was registered in Burnley, Lancashire.

On 30 August 1922 Clara married George Dacre Crewdson at Holy Trinity Church, Habergham Eaves, Lancashire.

George was born on 8 June 1890 – his birth was also registered in Burnley.

When the 1939 Register was taken on 29 September 1939 George and Clara were living at 7 Church Street, Briercliffe, Burnley. George was employed as a “cotton loom overlooker” and Clara’s occupation was described as “unpaid domestic duties”. Also living with them were two children – Eveline and James. Their first daughter, Irene, was born in 1923 but sadly died the same year.

Within three and half years Clara would be left a widow with two children following the death of George at the age of 52.

The Nelson Leader of 29 January 1943 reported on George’s death as a result of what at first appears to be an innocuous incident at work.

George Daker Crewdson - Nelson Leader 29 January 1943.png

Fatal Pin-prick

OVERLOOKER’S DEATH FROM SEPTICAEMIA

A pin-prick sustained while handling pickers at Primrose Mill, Harle Syke, was held responsible for the death of George Dacre Crewdson (51), 7 Church Street, Briercliffe, a power loom overlooker employed by the South View Manufacturing Company, when the East Lancashire Coroner (Mr F Rowland) conducted an inquest at Brierfield Town Hall on Wednesday morning.
The widow was represented by Mr Riley; Mr Howarth appeared on behalf of the employers, and Miss Blackburn, H M Inspector of Factories, was also present.
The widow, Mrs Clara Crewdson, said her husband was a healthy man and never had a serious illness. During the evening of Friday January 8th, he complained that the first finger on his right hand was sore, and said he had got something in it at his work, but he did not say when. He explained that he was putting some pickers on and caught his finger on one of these, but whether it was a piece of hide or not which had entered the finger he did not know. Whatever it was, it had burnt in owing to the picker being hot. He bathed the finger in hot water and applied a poultice, but despite further treatment, the infection became worse. He followed his employment until 5.30pm on Wednesday, January 13th, and on the 15th consulted Dr Lamberti, who treated the injury and ordered her husband to go to Victoria Hospital the following day. He paid two visits to the hospital, and ought to have gone there again on the 18th, but he was too ill to do so. Dr Lamberti, and later Dr Munroe, visited him frequently, and on the 21st a surgeon was called in. Despite this attention, however, her husband died last Saturday.
Sam Riley, another overlooker employed at Primrose Mill, said he was in the storeroom during the afternoon of January 11th, and in the course of a conversation Crewdson said he had injured the first finger of his right hand, at the same time holding up the bandaged finger, which was afterwards seen by other employees.
Dr Lamberti said the finger was septic when Crewdson first consulted him on January 15th. It was incised at the hospital, but the man’s condition grew worse, and his death on the 23rd was the result of septicaemia. Witness added that when he first examined the finger he found a small pin-prick between the first and second joints.
Witness agreed with Mr Riley that this could have been caused by a splinter which entered the finger as the man’s hand slid over the picker.
Dr Palin, Police Surgeon for the Brierfield district, said the post-mortem examination revealed the cause of death to be septic pneumonia due to infection from the finger. As the finger was very swollen the point of entry had passed away.
Witness agreed with Mr Riley that the medical history from January 8th onwards was consistent with the man having met with such an injury.
The Coroner said there had been great doubt as to the continuity between the alleged injury and the man’s death, but that had now been cleared away. He was quite satisfied that Crewdson did injure his finger in the way he had said at his work. Evidently it was just a pin-prick, and the man probably did not think at first that it was serious; nevertheless, he and his wife applied the necessary treatment from the outset. The man, being a conscientious workman, continued to follow his employment until he consulted the doctor on the 15th, but by that time septicaemia had got hold, and this caused his death. There was a chain of cause and effect between the injury and the man’s death, therefore the proper verdict was one of “Accidental death”. The Coroner said he did not doubt that the injury was caused while the man was following his employment, and deeply sympathised with the widow.
Mr Howarth expressed the regret of the employers, who recognised that they had lost a conscientious workman, and Mr Riley suitably replied on behalf of the widow.

Clara remarried to Smith Bannister sometime in the fourth quarter of 1946. She passed away in 1966 in Blackpool, Lancashire.

Sunday’s Obituary – Margaret Stowell (1864-1868)

Margaret Stowell is my 2nd cousin 3x removed. her parents are Thomas Stowell and Ann Wroe. Our common ancestors are John Stowell and Ann Riddeoff – my 4x great grandparents.

Margaret was born sometime in the first quarter of 1864 in Burnley, Lancashire. She was the first of at least ten children. Margaret was baptised on 25 March 1864 at St. Paul’s church in Burnley.

Very sadly Margaret only had a short life.

The Burnley Gazette of Saturday 15 August 1868 carried the following story.

Margaret Stowell - Burnley Gazette 15 august 1868.png

SHOCKING ACCIDENT – On Monday a little girl four years of age, named Margaret Stowell, and who resided at Lanshaw Bridge, came to a sad end by being run over with a cart, the wheel passing over her head, and killing her instantaneously. The inquest was held on Wednesday at the Emmett Arms before H U Hargreaves, Esq., coroner, when the jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”

Wedding Wednesday – Norma Musgrove and Bernard Wearden

Norma Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Joseph Musgrove and Annie Simpson. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

Norma married Bernard Wearden at St James Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire, on 7 July 1954. The following notice was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times two days later.

WEARDEN—MUSGROVE

Mr Bernard Wearden, son of Mr and the late Mrs J Wearden, of 30 Thomas Street, Colne, and Miss Norma Musgrove, daughter of Mr and Mrs J Musgrove, of 58 West View, Clitheroe, were married at St James’s Church, Clitheroe, on Wednesday, by the Rector, the Rev A Lord. Mr G Hitchen, was the organist.

Given away by her father, the bride wore a gown of white silk net over taffeta, trimmed with orange blossom. Her full length embroidered veil was held in place by a wreath of orange blossom, and she carried a bouquet of pink carnations and pink roses.

The bridesmaid was Miss Edith Musgrove, sister of the bride, who wore pink and mauve silk net over pink taffeta, trimmed with lace. She had a pink feathered headdress and carried a bouquet of white carnations.

Mr Malcolm Frankland, friend of the bridegroom, was best man, and Mr Gordon Pinch, was groomsman.

After a reception at the Station Hotel, Mr and Mrs Wearden left for their honeymoon, the bride wearing a light-grey costume with pink and black accessories. They will reside at 9 Atkincoats Road, Colne.

Among the wedding gifts was a silver coffee service from the bride’s workfriends.