Month: December 2018

Sports Centre Saturday – Lewis Coles

Lewis Coles is my 3rd cousin. He was born sometime in the fourth quarter of 1938 – his birth was registered at Darwen in Lancashire. Lewis is the second child of Lewis Charles Coles and Irene Fletcher. Our common ancestors are Harrison Musgrove and Jane Rooking – my 2x great grandparents.

In the 1939 Register Lewis’s parents are living at 9 Hollies Road, Blackburn, Lancashire. His father’s occupation is “schoolmaster”.

I know from the newspaper article below that Lewis attended Clitheroe Royal Grammar School, where his father was an English master. It seems that Lewis was a bit of a star at athletics and was awarded the Victor Ludorum Cup in 1955.

This is an extract from the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of Friday 15 July 1955. – taken from the British Newspaper Archives website.

Lewis Coles - Clitheroe Advertiser and Times 15 July 1955.png

Master’s Son Is Grammar School Victor Ludorum

Sixteen-year-old Lewis Coles, of Hollies Road, Wilpshire, son of Mr L C Coles, English master at Clitheroe Royal Grammar School, became this year’s Victor Ludorum at the school’s annual sports at High Moor, on Tuesday.
Coles, who had 11 points, was presented with the Victor Ludorum Cup by a former physical training master at the school, Mr D W Spencer.
He had earlier set up two new school records running 100 yards in 10.6 seconds, and 220 yards in 24.6 seconds.

The following year Lewis was runner up to Colin David Ford – only one point separated them.

If I say so myself I was also pretty nippy as a runner at school and won both the 100 and 220 yards races for my “house”. I also represented the school at West Leeds Schools athletic events. Now I’m lucky if I can manage to run a bath!!

Running Certificate

Wedding Wednesday – Edith May Musgrove and Malcolm Graham Frankland

Edith May Musgrove is my 1st cousin 1x removed. Her parents are Joseph Musgrove and Annie Simpson. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

Edith May married Malcolm Graham Frankland at St James Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire on 17 September 1955. Details of the wedding were announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 23 September 1955.

Frankland-Musgrove Wedding.png

FRANKLAND – MUSGROVE

Miss Edith May Musgrove, younger daughter of Mr and Mrs J Musgrove, of 58 West View, Clitheroe, was married at St James’s Church, Clitheroe, on Saturday, to Mr Malcolm Graham Frankland, only son of Mr and Mrs W Frankland, of Victoria Avenue, Chatburn.

Given away by her father, the bride was attired in a gown of white silk net over taffeta, trimmed with orange blossom, with a full-length veil surmounted with a wreath of orange blossom. She carried a bouquet of pink roses and white carnations.

She was attended by her sister, Mrs Norma Wearden, who wore a dress of blue net trimmed with white net and pearls. Her bouquet was of mixed sweet peas.

The best man was Mr M Nixon, a friend of the bridegroom, and the groomsmen were Mr B Wearden, brother-in-law of the bride, and Mr D Frankland, a friend of the groom.

During the ceremony, which was conducted by the Rector, the Rev J S Parry, the hymns “Lead us, Heavenly Father” and “The Voice that breath’d o’er Eden” were sung. Mr G Hitchen was organist.

A reception was held at the Station Hotel, Clitheroe, after which the couple left for a honeymoon in Blackpool, the bride wearing a lemon coloured dress and tweed coat, with tan accessories. They will reside at 58 West View, Clitheroe.

Among the numerous wedding gifts were a fruit set and wineglasses from workfriends of the bride at Stonebridge Mill, Chatburn, and a clock and towels from companions of the bridegroom in the 4th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment, TA.

Sunday’s Obituary – Thomas Wilson Critchlow (1895-1945)

Lucy Ellen Burt is my wife’s 4th cousin 1x removed – so not very close then. Her parents are Robert Duncan Burt and Mary Elizabeth Hollins. Lucy and my wife’s common ancestor is John Aspley – my wife’s 4x great grandfather.

Sometime in the third quarter of 1919 Lucy married Thomas Wilson Critchlow – the marriage is registered at Stone in Staffordshire.

In the 1939 Register Thomas and Lucy are living at 111 Wilson Road, Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire. Thomas is working as a grocery store manager.

On Thursday 20 September 1945 Thomas went to a football match and didn’t return home. He went to Stoke City’s Victoria Ground to watch Stoke City and Manchester United.

The Birmingham Daily Gazette of 21 September 1945 published the following brief account.

Thomas Critchlow - Birmingham Daily Gazette 21 September 1945.png

Two Spectators Die at Football Match

Sitting within a few yards of each other in one of the stands at the match between Stoke City and Manchester United last evening two elderly men collapsed and died within a few minutes of each other. They were Thomas Critchlow of Wilson Road, Hanford, Stoke, and Percy Legge, of Blackfriars Road, Newcastle-under-Lyme.

In his will Thomas left effects totalling £2611 12s 1d to Lucy Ellen Critchlow (widow) and Frederick John Davison (rubber factory foreman).

The final score in the match in case you were wondering was Stoke City 1 v Manchester United 2.

In 1939 at the outbreak of WW2 the Football League was cancelled. In its place were formed War Leagues and cups, based on geographical lines rather than based on previous league placement. However, none of these were considered to be competitive football, and thus their records are not recognised by the Football League and thus not included in official records.

In the 1945/46 season, when Thomas died at the match, Stoke City ended the season in 13th place in Football League North with 42 points. Manchester United finished in 4th place with 49 points. League winners were Sheffield United with 60 points and bottom of the league in 22nd place was……Leeds United with 25 points.

Sadly Thomas Critchlow and Percy Legge were not the only people to die at a Stoke City match in the 1945/46 season.

On 9 March 1946 Stoke City were playing Bolton Wanderers in the Sixth Round of the FA Cup at Burnden Park, Bolton, Lancashire.

The Burnden Park disaster was a human crush which resulted in the deaths of 33 people and injuries to hundreds of Bolton fans. It was the deadliest stadium related disaster in British history until the Ibrox Park disaster in 1971.

Wedding Wednesday – Albert Kent and Hazel Musgrove

Hazel Musgrove is my aunty – her parents are Fred Ainsworth Stowell Musgrove and Florrie Musgrove.

Hazel was born on 31 January 1925 in Clitheroe, Lancashire.

On 5 April 1947 Hazel married Albert Kent at St James Church, Clitheroe. The wedding was announced in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 11 April 1947.

Kent - Musgrove 1.png

 

Kent - Musgrove 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KENT – MUSGROVE

On Saturday, at St James’s Church, the Rector (Rev Alexander Lord) solemnised the wedding of Mr Albert Kent, only son of Mr and Mrs R Kent, of 10 Brook Street, and Miss Hazel Musgrove, second daughter of Mr and Mrs F Musgrove, of 102 Whalley Road. Mr Ford was organist, and the hymns were “The Voice that breathed o’er Eden” and “Lead us, Heavenly Father.”

The bride, attired in a gown of heavy white satin with embroidered veil surmounted by a coronet of orange blossom and pearls, and carrying a bouquet of daffodils, was given away by her father. In attendance were Miss Nellie Hall (a friend) and Miss Mary Musgrove (sister). The former wore a blue taffeta dress trimmed with pink lace, with head-dress to tone. Her bouquet was of pink tulips. Miss Musgrove’s dress was of a heavy pink satin, with head-dress to tone, and she carried a Victorian posy.

The duties of best man and groomsman were carried out respectively by Mr Vincent O’Neill, the groom’s brother-in-law, and Master S Musgrove, brother of the bride. As the bride left the church she was presented with two silver horse-shoes by Master Robert Griffiths and Miss Patricia Lord.

The reception was held at The Craven Heifer Hotel, and later Mr and Mrs Kent left for their honeymoon at Charnford, Leicestershire. The bride travelled in a grey pinstriped costume and light coat with burgundy accessories.

The bridegroom gave the bride a handbag, his gifts to the bridesmaids being pearl ear-rings and a silver bracelet. The bride’s present to the bridegroom was a wristlet watch. Wedding gifts included an electric iron from No. 3 Shed, Westhead’s Mill, and an electric kettle, etc. from colleagues of the groom on the staff at Coplow.

Mr and Mrs Kent will reside at 95 Whalley Road, Clitheroe.

 

Sunday’s Obituary – Robert Halstead (1880-1957)

Robert Halstead is the husband of my grand aunt, Ellen Musgrove.

I have written about Robert and Ellen before – here – with a report celebrating their golden wedding anniversary in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 20 June 1952.

Robert passed away on 21 January 1957 and his obituary was published in the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times on 25 January.

Robert Halstead - CAT 25 January 1957.png

Well known among the older generation of Clitheronians, Mr Robert Halstead, of 1 Curzon Street, Clitheroe, died at his home on Monday. He was 76.

Mr Halstead, who was born in the street in which he died, was a keen musician. He was pianist in the band led by the late Mr Joe Margerison and also entertained at concerts at Clitheroe Old People’s Club, of which he was a member. During the war he was organist at the Congregational Church.

He was also interested in football and bowling, and for some years was secretary of the Castle Park Veterans’ Bowling Club.

Mr Halstead, an overlooker until his retirement 10 years ago, ws associated with Moor Lane Methodist Church. He was chief ranger for the Ancient Order of Foresters, Court Royal Castle.

During the first World War he served as a Special Constable and was awarded a medal for long service.

Mr Halstead had not been well for some months, and sympathy is extended to his widow and daughter in their bereavement.

The Rev. J H Fenton officiated at the funeral at Clitheroe Cemetery yesterday.

Workday Wednesday – James Musgrove (1901-1983)

James Musgrove is my grand uncle – brother of my grandmother Florrie Musgrove.

James was born on 9 April 1901 in Clitheroe, Lancashire – the fifth of ten children to my great grandparents Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner.

At the age of 18 James married Edith Jane Hibble on 27 October 1919.

In the 1939 Register James is presumably away doing his bit for the war. Edith is at home living at 51 Woone Lane, Clitheroe.

James came home safely from WW2 and at some point afterwards started working for the Post Office. I know from the following newspaper article that he drove a Post Office van – and in this instance he had a lucky escape.

James Musgrove - CAT 11 March 1955.png

Mail Van Overturns

On the way from Blackburn with Clitheroe’s morning mail, early on Friday, a Post Office motor van skidded on a slippery toad surface at Barrow, turned a half circle, struck the pavement and overturned on its side.

The driver, James Musgrove, aged 53, of 51 Woone Lane, Clitheroe, escaped with bruises about the arms and back.

The mail was transferred to another vehicle and there was no delay in the morning delivery in Clitheroe.

Sunday’s Obituary – Susannah Musgrove (1856-1869)

Susannah Musgrove is my great grand aunt – a sister of my great grandfather Thomas Ainsworth Musgrove.

Susannah was born on 2 August 1856 at Over Darwen, Lancashire. She was the first of five children born to my 2x great grandparents John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth.

I had known for a long time that Susannah died young at the age of 12. However I have only just found a newspaper article with details of the circumstances of her death. This report is from the Preston Herald of 6 February 1869.

Susannah Musgrove - Preston Herald 6 February 1869.png

A GIRL KILLED AT THE BELGRAVE PAPER STAINING WORKS

On Monday afternoon a fatal accident happened to a girl named Susannah Musgrove, aged 12 years, daughter of Mr John Musgrove, who was employed as a short time tearer in connection with the block printing department. It appears that she had been to school on Monday afternoon, and on returning called at the print shop to see if her master was there, and was seen playing about in the room on the second floor. About 5.40pm a man named Joseph Riding had occasion to use the hoist, which is in one corner of the room, and used for the purpose of raising goods from one room to another. As the hoist did not descend lower than the second floor, the man Riding went to see what was the cause. On getting there he found the deceased laid down on her belly on the floor, with her head underneath the hoist. The hoist was at once raised, but the unfortunate girl was dead. She must have been in the act of looking down the hoist way into the lower room, and therefore could not see the hoist when descending. An inquest will be held on the body.

You know sometimes you just wonder how much tragedy one family can have.

Susannah’s grandfather, Joseph Musgrove (my 3x great grandfather) died in 1858 as the result of a fall at home when he dislocated his neck. I blogged about this here.

John Musgrove, Susannah’s father, committed suicide in 1884 – see blog post here.

Of the five children that were born to John Musgrove and Catherine Ainsworth only two survived to adulthood – Thomas and Joseph.

Susannah died as the result of the accident. Her brother George died on the day he was born 20 August 1857. And another brother, James, died at three months old in 1868.

So sad.