Day: February 11, 2018

Military Monday – Curtis Walker (1918-1942)

Curtis Walker was born about 1918 – his birth is registered in Skipton, Yorkshire, in the first quarter of 1919. His parents are Curtis Walker and Annie Paley. Our common ancestor is Ellen Paley, my great grandmother.

Curtis doesn’t appear in the 1939 Register, I guess this may be because he was already away serving in the military,

So the next record I have for Curtis is a marriage to Florence Mabel Newhouse sometime in the December quarter of 1940, registered in Skipton.

Curtis served in the Royal Army Service Corps (RASC) as a driver in WW2 – his service number was T/113820.

According to the records on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) website Curtis died on 14 November 1942 while attached to the HQ 50th (Northumbrian) Division.

Curtis is commemorated at the Alamein Memorial in Egypt.

The following information is taken from the CWGC website.

The Alamein Memorial forms the entrance to the El Alamein War Cemetery in Egypt. The memorial commemorates nearly 12,000 servicemen of the British Empire who died in the Western Desert campaigns of the Second World War including the Battle of El Alamein.

The Battle of El Alamein marked the culmination of the North African campaign between Commonwealth forces and the Axis forces (German and Italian). The Allies, led by Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery, pinned their hopes on their new defensive position near the coastal railway station of El Alamein.

The campaign in the Western Desert was fought between the Commonwealth forces (with, later, the addition of two brigades of Free French and one each of Polish and Greek troops) all based in Egypt, and the Axis forces (German and Italian) based in Libya. The battlefield, across which the fighting surged back and forth between 1940 and 1942, was the 1,000 kilometres of desert between Alexandria in Egypt and Benghazi in Libya.

For both sides the objective was the control of the Mediterranean, the link with the East through the Suez Canal, the Middle East oil supplies and the supply route to Russia through Persia.

Panels of the memorial commemorate different areas of service and the location. The Land Forces panels commemorate more than 8,500 soldiers of the Commonwealth who died in the campaigns in Egypt and Libya, and in the operations of the Eighth Army in Tunisia up to 19 February 1943, who have no known grave. It also commemorates those who served and died in Syria, Lebanon, Iraq and Persia.

The Air Forces panels commemorate more than 3,000 airmen of the Commonwealth who died in the campaigns in Egypt, Libya, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Greece, Crete and the Aegean, Ethiopia, Eritrea and the Somalilands, the Sudan, East Africa, Aden and Madagascar, who have no known grave. Those who served with the Rhodesian and South African Air Training Scheme and have no known grave are also commemorated here.

The memorial was designed by Sir Hubert Worthington. Sir Hubert was Principal Architect for North Africa for the Commission. His work required accepting the special demands of the terrain and climate of the regions. For example, a desert site such as El Alamein needed high walls to keep out drifting sand and water was needed for plants.

Alamein Memorial takes the form of a cloister which forms the northern boundary of the cemetery and the principal entrance to it. The name panels are of Portland stone and the cloisters are of limestone. At each side of the forecourt broad flights of steps lead to the flat roof of the memorial, from which there is a view of the cemetery, the surrounding desert and to the north, the sea.

el-alamein-war-cemetery.jpg

El-Alamein War Cemetery

Advertisements

Sunday’s Obituary – Mary Patricia Lord (1940-1951)

Mary Patricia Lord is my 2nd cousin. Her parents are John Edward Lord and Marjorie Musgrove. Our common ancestors are Joseph Musgrove and Elizabeth Ann Turner, my great grandparents.

Mary was born in Clitheroe, Lancashire. Her birth is registered in the March quarter of 1940.

I already knew that she had died at the very young of eleven. And while researching the newspaper archives for my post about her father (see link above) I came across the following story from the Clitheroe Advertiser and Times of 24 August 1951.

Mary Patricia Lord - CAT 24 August 1951.png

Inquest Verdicts On Victims Of Clitheroe Accidents

Verdicts of “accidental death” were returned at Blackburn inquests on Friday on 11-year-old Mary Patricia Lord, of 5, Beech Street, Clitheroe, who died from injuries received when she fell from her cycle, and on 68-year-old Samuel Cook, a patient of Clitheroe Hospital, who was knocked down by a car outside the hospital and later died in Blackburn Royal Infirmary.

Described by witnesses as “a very careful rider,” Pat, who was given the cycle as a present when she passed the examination for entrance to Clitheroe Grammar School, lost control when her foot slipped from the pedal, while riding in Peel Street, last Tuesday.

She fell, struck her head on the kerb-edge, and died the following day in Blackburn Royal Infirmary.

The jury returned their verdict without retiring.

So Marjorie (my 1st cousin 1x removed) lost her husband in WW2 after less than five years of marriage and then her daughter at the age of eleven.